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9.25 Evo versus CPC Deluxe HD

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#1 Simon0672

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 07:16 AM

Hi Experts,

 

I've been getting into this hobby during 2018, using a Celestron AstroFi 130mm newtonian telescope. I picked that up as an entry level to see whether I was truly going to take to... which I have.

 

I've got a lot out of it but am itching to upgrade. I do most of my observing at my parent's country home which is a very dark site (and also elevated about 1100m) which is where the scope will live 90% of the time. I am primarily interested in visual, the photography I do is simply the equivalent of happy snaps to help record what I've seen. I've been reading different parts of this site and others to get some tips.

 

I've become interested in getting the Celestron 9.25 Evolution but haven't ruled out going the extra mile to get the CPC Deluxe HD in the same size. It is a fair amount of extra $$$, but wonder whether I should be trying to "future proof" my purchase if I can.

 

My queries are:

- The extra stability of the dual fork arm on the CPC is appealing, but is the Evolution mount reasonably stable with a little light breeze, say? I note the 9.25 Evolution has a heavier tripod which would help stability I presume.

- The battery in the Evolution seems a fantastic convenience, but I worry if it will become a problem longer term - will the battery lifespan reduce significantly in say 5 years time, and if so can they be replaced without buying a new scope? I run my existing scope off mains power with a long extension lead and would have no problem doing the same with a new scope (say the CPC)

- I have read that the 9.25 is a "sweet spot" and so the difference with the Edge HD is less noticeable. I've also seen one can get the focal reducer / field flattener which I suspect may be enough for visual?

- Is the focussing similar in these two scopes? A big bugbear with my current scope is that the focusser doesn't have any sort of fine tuning, it's a very blunt instrument. 

 

However my MAIN query is:

- I've been disturbed reading some comments suggesting that getting a good quality scope is luck of the draw due to a wide variability in manufacturing quality within a given model. Is this really the case? Without having a second one next to it, how can one tell that it's up to scratch? Is there any recourse with the store or manufacturer? Some of those comments about variability may be a little old, so not sure if they are still relevant.

 

Many thanks in advance for any thoughts that can be offered.

 

Simon


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#2 Kashmir

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 08:10 AM

In terms of stability the CPC will by design add some value particularly if the wind is a bit choppy. Under normal circumstances my Evo does not give me stability issues, sometimes I add supression pads for certain surfaces. You might want to gauge your average conditions at your site before deciding, if its surface winds are creeping up maybe a CPC might be a better choice.

 

My evolution is just coming up 5 years old and I haven't noticed any drop off in battery performance. Remember the Evo has a lifepo4 battery which are more efficient than other lithium batteries. I haven't seen an official Celestron battery replacement set, but they already stated there will be one at some point. Access to the battery is fairly easy , some on here have opened up the casing to expose it so look for those threads. 

 

It is far easier to add another scope to an evo mount, I often use my short refractors on it. Not so easy on CPC.

 

As far as focussing goes the best thing you can do with a SCT is replace the stock focusser with a Starlite feathertouch one, this gives you fine tuning. A focal reducer is available but do you need one? I have one and rarely use it preffering the native views.

 

Some scope sample variation is inevitable, but these days it seems very minor where you would be hard pushed to see a difference, but I think you would be unlucky to get a real lemon in which case you go back to your dealer. Generally speaking the overall QC is pretty good from Celestron, and many stories of poor performance are often down to seeing conditions rather than technical shortcomings. 

 

Good luck whichever way you decide.


Edited by Kashmir, 05 January 2019 - 08:11 AM.

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#3 saguaro

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 10:32 AM

I have a 3-yr old Evo mount and the battery needs replacing. I've ordered it from Starizona, which fortunately for me is my local astronomy shop. The battery costs about $100 from Celestron, and I'm going to have Starizona do the replacement for me. I can continue to use the mount on AC power in the meantime. That's a good thing, since the battery has been on backorder for several months.

 

The CPC will be more stable, but also heavier and therefore less portable. The Evo mount allows me to use several different OTAs, while the OTA on the CPC is not interchangeable. I can use my C8, Lunt solar refractor scope, and 100mm binoculars on the Evo mount.

 

If you place a higher value on versatility and portability, the Evo is the better choice. If you place a higher value on stability then the CPC is the better choice.


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#4 Simon0672

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 06:09 AM

Many thanks, this is very helpful advice



#5 Billytk

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 09:34 AM

The 9.25 pushes the Evo mount too far. I found it impossible to focus manually. I had to buy a JMI electric focuser.



#6 AxelB

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 09:43 AM

The Edge hd will offer you sharp stars to the edge of your largest field of view.

I’m now sorry I didn’t get an edge hd ota...

#7 Kashmir

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 09:18 PM

I have a 3-yr old Evo mount and the battery needs replacing. I've ordered it from Starizona, which fortunately for me is my local astronomy shop. The battery costs about $100 from Celestron, and I'm going to have Starizona do the replacement for me. I can continue to use the mount on AC power in the meantime. That's a good thing, since the battery has been on backorder for several months.

 

The CPC will be more stable, but also heavier and therefore less portable. The Evo mount allows me to use several different OTAs, while the OTA on the CPC is not interchangeable. I can use my C8, Lunt solar refractor scope, and 100mm binoculars on the Evo mount.

 

If you place a higher value on versatility and portability, the Evo is the better choice. If you place a higher value on stability then the CPC is the better choice.

Thats quite surprising your battery gave out so quick, what was your maintenance schedule? I think you would have a case under warranty if your use was reasonable. Very good point on portability, the Evo is really quite good regard that.

 

The 9.25 pushes the Evo mount too far. I found it impossible to focus manually. I had to buy a JMI electric focuser.

How does it? Many of us manage without electric focus I know I do. Please elaborate.

 

The Edge hd will offer you sharp stars to the edge of your largest field of view.

I’m now sorry I didn’t get an edge hd ota...

So will a focal reducer! What you have to decide is what kind of view you prefer. For visual I prefer the native view, yes it deteriorates towards the edge but overall the targets central look superb. Edge is for imaging, you can make a choice.


Edited by Kashmir, 06 January 2019 - 09:20 PM.


#8 Billytk

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 07:37 PM

"How does it? Many of us manage without electric focus I know I do. Please elaborate."

 

It shook so bad with the slightest touch, I could not focus it accurately by hand.



#9 mark379

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 12:39 PM

My Evo 9.25 works just fine, but at the limit for stability. Vibration suppression pads take care it for the most part.

I also use a CGEM  e/q mount with my 9.25 if I really need it to be super stable.

The CPC is fine, but with the evo and dovetail, you can use different scopes on the setup if you like.

Many thanks, this is very helpful advice



#10 AxelB

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 02:33 PM

So will a focal reducer! What you have to decide is what kind of view you prefer. For visual I prefer the native view, yes it deteriorates towards the edge but overall the targets central look superb. Edge is for imaging, you can make a choice.


It depends on your observed target. For planets I agree the regular sct is perfect. For large star clusters filling the field of view with stars, less so. It also depends on the focussing hability of your eyes (which deteriorate with age).

Using the Celestron f6.3 reducer/corrector with a correspondingly shorter eyepiece helps but is not perfect. Apparently a much better corrector is offered by Stararizona but it’s very expensive...


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