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Binary system with both components variable

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#1 Starfleet22

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 11:44 AM

Imagine a fairly bright and wide double star with both of its components significantly variable.

I have been constantly wondering if such a thing as two Mira stars might exist as part of a binary system, ranging over 5 or 10 magnitudes each from minimum brightness to maximum. Or even two pulsating Cepheids for that matter with an amplitude of 2 or 3 magnitudes.

 

I expect the probability of finding such a thing would be extremely low. But the wonder of it would be immensely fascinating. Has anyone observed such a system yet?smile.gif



#2 ssmith

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 08:36 PM

Nothing comes to mind that would meet your stated criteria: A relatively wide and bright binary pair, where both components are subject to a relatively large change in magnitude.
 
If there were such a pair I believe it would be widely known and celebrated.

Many if not most stars are variable to some degree - including our sun - but to find two in relatively close proximity with such large swings would be very rare.
 
There are pairs where one component is variable.  The one that I am most familiar with is Chi Triangului which is not a variable star per se but the primary is an eclipsing variable where the primary changes by 4 magnitudes when an unseen companion passes in front of it.  Here is a video of one of my observations of it:
 
https://www.dropbox....1-3-17.mp4?dl=0

Edited by ssmith, 10 January 2019 - 08:59 PM.

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#3 flt158

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 03:50 PM

That is utterly amazing video!!

Thank you for the drop box, Steve. 

What a brilliant universe we live in!

Chi Trianguli is certainly one to check out when I get my focuser fixed. 

And many thanks to Star Fleet 22 for raising the original question. 

 

Kindest regards from Aubrey. 


Edited by flt158, 11 January 2019 - 03:51 PM.


#4 Starfleet22

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 11:37 AM

Superb system and I really enjoyed the video Steve!

I have added X Trianguli to my list of ones to observe.

 

Another good one I love is AF Arietis where the primary is pretty and colourful.

 

Perhaps there is a list somewhere no doubt of doubles stars with variable A/B components.

 

Cheers again



#5 dmdouglass

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 12:00 PM

Cool video Steve...

 

Its "winking" at us.



#6 David Gray

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 12:59 PM

Imagine a fairly bright and wide double star with both of its components significantly variable.

I have been constantly wondering if such a thing as two Mira stars might exist as part of a binary system, ranging over 5 or 10 magnitudes each from minimum brightness to maximum. Or even two pulsating Cepheids for that matter with an amplitude of 2 or 3 magnitudes.

 

I expect the probability of finding such a thing would be extremely low. But the wonder of it would be immensely fascinating. Has anyone observed such a system yet?smile.gif

The open cluster NGC 7790 hosts four variables. Two being the close Cepheid-pair CEab Cas as I understand it may be a binary system; but seems well established they are cluster members.

 

There is a fair bit of searchable info online with this system – some of it plain wrong and confused. For e.g. CF Cas is not the B component of the pair: they are simply CEa & CEb. (Leopold/Leo 55.

 

I addressed that issue recently on this post (which includes a field sketch).........

 

https://www.cloudyni...riables-ce-cas/

 

DG.




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