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Comet C/2018 Y1 (Iwamoto)

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#1 Aquarellia

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 06:20 AM

You know the comet C/2018 V1 (Machholz-Fujikawa-Iwamoto), some days after the same Mr. Iwamoto has discovered this other new comet.

The comet C/2018 Y1 will reach perihelion in early February and some days after the comet will pass within 0.3 AU of the earth.  Prediction (???) +7.3.

Here my first sketch

C2018Y1_20190109_l.jpg

 

DC (?) 3, Magn. +9 to +10

 

Clear sky to you all

 

Michel


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#2 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 09:08 AM

Michel:

 

I want to thank you for posting your drawing and the information about C/2018 Y1. 

 

It was a clear night and I was outside observing and came inside for something warm to drink and warm up.  I decided to check Cloudy NIghts and saw you post.  Looked up the location using Sky  Safari, it was an easy star hop and I spotted it immediately.  It was brighter than I expected. 

 

It was about 25 degrees elevation the sky in that region measured about 21.1 mpsas and I was using my 22 inch.  You are about 11 degrees north of me so it never gets more than 25 degrees above the horizon, you are having to work hard. 

 

My best..

 

Jon Isaacs


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#3 Aquarellia

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 11:44 AM

Michel:

 

I want to thank you for posting your drawing and the information about C/2018 Y1. 

 

It was a clear night and I was outside observing and came inside for something warm to drink and warm up.  I decided to check Cloudy NIghts and saw you post.  Looked up the location using Sky  Safari, it was an easy star hop and I spotted it immediately.  It was brighter than I expected. 

 

It was about 25 degrees elevation the sky in that region measured about 21.1 mpsas and I was using my 22 inch.  You are about 11 degrees north of me so it never gets more than 25 degrees above the horizon, you are having to work hard. 

 

My best..

 

Jon Isaacs

You welcome Jon, and thank you for this so kind message, I really appreciate! 

This is one of the goal of CloudyNights, share information to the whole community.

 

You'r right, with my 10" (but a Mewlon...) that was quite a challenge, anyway I was unable to point out the other comet: 38P, much better placed for me during the same night.

Michel



#4 aeajr

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 01:52 PM

Was not aware of this one.

 

Looks like it never gets above the nighttime horizon for me.  At Mag 15 I likely would not be able to see it anyway. 



#5 Special Ed

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 03:43 PM

Nice observation and sketch, Michel.  smile.gif    Looks pretty small--not an easy catch.  This is one to keep an eye on, though.

 

@ Ed--Michel reported a magnitude of between 9.0 and 10.0--not 15.  If you got that off of some software, be advised that those estimates are seldom accurate (or even close).  Best to look for magnitude estimates posted by observers.


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#6 aeajr

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 04:47 PM

Thanks for the advice.  



#7 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 08:23 PM

You welcome Jon, and thank you for this so kind message, I really appreciate! 

This is one of the goal of CloudyNights, share information to the whole community.

 

You'r right, with my 10" (but a Mewlon...) that was quite a challenge, anyway I was unable to point out the other comet: 38P, much better placed for me during the same night.

Michel

 

Michel:

 

It was an unexpected treat and  topped the evening with a delicious dessert . 

 

I was able to see 38P but it is very small,  much smaller than Y1. 

 

How about 46P ? Its no longer naked eye but I was able to detect it in my 3X Nikon Teleconverter that i use as a monocular .

 

Jon



#8 Aquarellia

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 11:50 PM

Michel:

 

It was an unexpected treat and  topped the evening with a delicious dessert . 

 

I was able to see 38P but it is very small,  much smaller than Y1. 

 

How about 46P ? Its no longer naked eye but I was able to detect it in my 3X Nikon Teleconverter that i use as a monocular .

 

Jon

 

Hi Jon

46P was still very brillant, with an important magnification (375x) I was able to detect some details in the pseudo-nucleus.

Since Machholz , that was a nice season for comets!

Michel


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#9 Aquarellia

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 04:53 AM

Here the today's job

The comet is a little bit more brillant +9? still with DC 3 but the coma diameter is much more important, and not symetric.

My coma diameter estimation goes from 1.2', 5 nights ago to 4.8' today.

 

C2018Y1_20190114_l.jpg

 

This looks that that is a very active comet!

Michel


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#10 Aquarellia

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 04:40 AM

Next view, this morning while Venus and Jupiter are making a nice show dancing together.

 

C2018Y1_20190118_l.jpg

 

Magn looks not so brillant, +10 (?) and DC 4 (?) more contrasted

 

Clear sky to you all

 

Michel


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#11 andrew hampton

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 07:18 PM

I managed a glimpse of Comet C/2108 Y1 tonight in a ST80. Conditions were not great, just a diffuse patch at 30x was all I could observe. 

 

 

andrew


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#12 k9sb

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 11:50 AM

Observed Comet C/2018 Y1 Iwamoto last night 9 Feb 19 from 6:30 to 7:00 UTC with 10x70 binoculars, easy but large and diffuse DC-3.

A little smaller than full moon with no tail, just round , about 7th mag Bortle 5 sky.

It's really moving, noticed movement in 15 min with binoculars.

Sky was very transparent but cold 5 degrees F and windy here in Illinois. 

Weather has been cloudy last week,  and forecast more clouds next 5 days, hope I get another chance to see Iwamoto. 

It's a nice binocular comet, check it out!

 

Tim


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#13 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 03:35 AM

I observed C/2018 Y1 (Iwamoto) from the orange-zone Naylor Observatory several hours ago using 12x50 and 15x70 binoculars.  Its coma was diffuse and fairly large.  I had no trouble sweeping it up to the northwest of a seventh-magnitude star (HIP 54057, HD 95848) that lies northwest of fifth-magnitude star Chi Leonis (63 Leonis). 

 

I also viewed the comet through a 105mm f/4.2 Edmund Scientific Astroscan at 22, 26, and 44x, an 8" f/6 Hardin Dob at 34, 48, 60, and 120x, and a 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Astrola equatorial Newtonian at 59, 83, and 103x.  There seemed to be a bit of condensation at higher magnifications through the 12.5" Cave.  I didn't notice any color or a tail but the coma appeared to be somewhat asymmetric.

 

Click on https://earthsky.org...to-jan-feb-2019 and https://www.skyandte...-and-brightens/  for articles on Comet Iwamoto.

 

Dave Mitsky

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#14 Aquarellia

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 04:04 AM

Thank you Dave Tim and Andrew

 

There is also a small article with small video from Michael Jäger in Austria :

http://www.spaceweat...th=02&year=2019

 

The magnitude of the comet looks close to +6 now, (http://www.aerith.ne...8Y1/2018Y1.html) to be confirmed.

The last time I did observe and sketche this comet was during the moon eclipse.

Today, morning the weather was not cooperative, maybe tomorrow morning for me?

 

Clear sky to you all

 

Michel


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#15 Special Ed

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 02:59 PM

I observed Comet Iwamoto after Dave Mitsky did this morning.  At the time of my observation, 0800-0900 UT/3:00-4:00 AM ET, the comet was about 2.5 degrees NW of chi Leonis and about halfway between chi Leonis and 53 Leonis.  Conditions were clear and transparent, the comet's altitude was 56 degrees, the SQM-L reading was 21.56, and the temperature was 20F/-7C.

 

Iwamoto was easy in the 9x50 finder of my 120mm f/5 refractor.  Using magnifications of 19x and 35x, the comet appeared moderately condensed with a large, irregular coma and no tail.  I didn't make a sketch because I was distracted by problems with my Baader zoom eyepiece.

 

m1= ~6.5  DC= 3/  Dia= ~25'


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#16 Aquarellia

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 05:06 AM

Well done Michael, I hope that you fix your zoom ?

 

Here my morning job, the comet was really easy to find in my 7x50 finder scope.

Here the view with the famous Leo galactical cluster

 

C2018Y1_20190211_V_l.jpg

 

As for other observers I feel that the coma is not symetric, here maybe a little too much exagerated

 

For other views follow the link:

 

https://www.cloudyni...moto/?p=9139396

 

Clear sky to you all

Michel


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#17 Special Ed

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:32 AM

Nice sketch, Michel!  I saw on my chart that Iwamoto was headed for that galaxy cluster--glad you got to see and record it.  cool.gif 


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#18 Astrojensen

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 04:13 PM

I observed C/2018 Y1 this evening. I first swept it up in 8x40 binoculars and found it immediately after mere seconds of sweeping left of Regulus. It was very easy to see in the 8x40's. I then observed it in my 50/540mm Zeiss refractor. At 22.5x (24mm ES68), I estimated the coma to be around 0.5° in diameter, round, perhaps slightly elongated, slowly slightly brighter towards the middle. With 39x (14mm ES82) and 49x (11mm ES82), I could see a faint, stellar nucleus with averted vision. I compared the comet at 22.5x with M33 at the same magnification and the comet was much brighter and more condensed. I estimated the visual (apparent) magnitude to be around 5. This could possibly be an overestimation, because it's more condensed than M33. Visually, it's certainly already much more apparent than M33. 

 

A few minutes later, I observed the comet with my 102/1100mm ED refractor at 46x (24mm ES68), where I could confirm the details mentioned above. At 79x (14mm ES82) the stellar nucleus was fairly easily visible with averted vision. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#19 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 09:35 PM

Comet Iwamoto will pass just 3.5 arc minutes south of the tenth-magnitude spiral galaxy NGC 2903 at ~21:20 UT (4:20 p.m. EST) on February 13th.
 

Finder charts can be found at https://cometchasing...ets/2018_Y1.pdf and https://s22380.pcdn....-updated-V2.jpg

 

Dave Mitsky


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#20 johnpd

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 07:44 AM

I got this image early Tuesday morning. 1 min exposure @ f/2.8, ISO1000. The comet was a big blob in my 16X70 binos. I could not see it naked eye. My old eyes are not very good these days.

 

JohnD

 

 

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  • C2018_Y1_Iwamoto.jpg

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#21 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 02:16 PM

Did anyone manage to observe the comet passing 2' north of ngc 2903 last nite? Skies were partially clear when I took the scope out to cool in the evening but by the time this event was visible which was 6 hrs later (it was happening around 3am alaska time) it was cloudy. Today it's clear as a bell...oh well... maybe someone caught this? Would love to read a report, see a sketch or a photo. Weather does not cooperate with celestial events here very often...

#22 Aquarellia

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 03:43 PM

Yes, I will!

Here south France the weather is often cooperating,...

I will open the observatory to try a sketch in a while, keep in touch!

Michel


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#23 Aquarellia

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 05:15 PM

Ok, the moon was quite brillant but the spectacle was superb!

The motion was very high so I suspect my fellow astro-photographers to have some difficulties with this movement.  

So I did 11 sketches showing the passage, scanning for tomorrow. 

Michel


Edited by Aquarellia, 13 February 2019 - 05:16 PM.

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#24 Aquarellia

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 05:21 AM

As promised here's the encounter with the galaxy NGC 2903

 

C2018Y1_20190213_bd-tigb_l.jpg

 

The only issue was the brillant moon, to "rapid sketch" the galaxy shape I used a 26mm as well.

 

There is a real 3D effect about the distances look: the comet was very close to earth : 150 "light second", the stars +/- 1000 light year and the galaxy is 30 million light year from us.

Michel 


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#25 Special Ed

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:00 AM

Bravo, Michel!




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