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Comet C/2018 Y1 (Iwamoto)

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#51 goodricke1

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 12:45 PM

Once again we see the relationship between comet visibility and dark skies. From my rural location, Iwamoto is still easily visible in 20 x 80 binoculars.


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#52 Special Ed

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 02:23 PM

As the windstorm subsided, my area had clear skies so I went to the Naylor Observatory, which is located in an orange zone.  My first target with 12x50 and 15x70 binoculars was C/2018 Y1 (Iwamoto).  Comet Iwamoto appears to be fading fast.  Most of the recent estimates put it at 8th magnitude.  The comet was quite close to the magnitude 6.5 star HIP 27380.  There may have been the very slightest hint of a diffuse coma visible through the binoculars.  The transparency, according to the Clear Sky Chart, was average to below average.

 

http://www.cleardark...0400EdwNylrObPA

 

I then observed the area around the star with an 8" f/6 Hardin Dob at 40 and 86x and a 12.5" F/6.5 Cave Astrola Newtonian at 69 and 83x and failed to see much of anything.
 

Later on, I was able to see Comet Iwamoto without question through the 12.5" Cave Newtonian after taking a much needed warm-up break.  The comet had moved farther from HIP 27380 and was only faintly visible.  Boosting the magnification to 103x and then 147x and using averted vision resulted in a positive sighting.

Dave Mitsky

 

I took a quick look at Iwamoto with my 12x36 IS II's last night about 9:00 ET.  It was still windy and the stars appeared a little smeared but I could see the comet as a small diffuse patch just inside the pentagon of Auriga.  I couldn't spend anymore time because I was still dealing with the power outage, running a generator, etc.

 

The winds here were ferocious--they clocked a gust up at Snowshoe (about 35 miles north of here) at 88mph.

 

 

Once again we see the relationship between comet visibility and dark skies. From my rural location, Iwamoto is still easily visible in 20 x 80 binoculars.

 

Yes, I could see the comet with my little binoculars from my dark, rural location.

 

EDIT:  Not!  It seems that I didn't see Iwamoto after all.  See my post #56.

 

There is an interesting article in the February 2019 issue of S&T (p. 36) about your avatar namesake John Goodricke and his early observations of variable stars including Algol.  smile.gif


Edited by Special Ed, 27 February 2019 - 07:52 AM.

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#53 goodricke1

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 05:59 PM

There is an interesting article in the February 2019 issue of S&T (p. 36) about your avatar namesake John Goodricke and his early observations of variable stars including Algol.  smile.gif

 

Thanks, I'll check it out.

 

His is a fascinating tale of triumph in adversity, although his less well-known collaborator Edward Pigott probably deserves equal acclaim.



#54 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 08:22 PM

Once again we see the relationship between comet visibility and dark skies. From my rural location, Iwamoto is still easily visible in 20 x 80 binoculars.

That's true enough but the fact that the comet was close to a fairly bright star at the time didn't make seeing it any easier.


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#55 Special Ed

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 08:27 PM

Thanks, I'll check it out.

 

His is a fascinating tale of triumph in adversity, although his less well-known collaborator Edward Pigott probably deserves equal acclaim.

The article gives Pigott his due as friend, mentor, and collaborator.


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#56 Special Ed

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 08:31 AM

I went out last night again to look at the comet (9:00-11:00 PM ET/0200-0400 UT 27 Feb) and discovered that I hadn't seen the comet the night before last after all (even though I reported I had).  I made the classic amateur mistake and mistook M36 for the comet with my 12x36 binoculars.  I was expecting something like what I saw two weeks ago, where it was fairly large and bright, but it has faded rather dramatically.  It's no wonder Dave Mitsky had a hard time seeing it--it will take a lot of aperture to see much of it.

 

Last night I was using my 120mm refractor and the Baader Hyperion zoom eyepiece.  Skies were dark with average transparency.   The SQM-L reading was 21.54.  Using a chart, I first looked for Iwamoto with the 12x26's in Auriga just NW of M36.  Couldn't see it so I switched to the 9x50 RACI finder on the short tube refractor.  M36 and M38 were both in the field but I couldn't see any sign of the comet.  Thinking I had made a mistake when I plotted its position on my PSA from the Skyhound chart (which I had not printed out), I swept the area with the 9x50 finder.  Two weeks ago the comet was bright in the finder but now, nothing.

 

Finally, trusting my chart, I put the cross hairs of the finder on the spot where the comet should have been, set the ep on the 24mm setting yielding 25x for my scope, and took a look.  There it was--small and dim--just a shadow of what it was back in mid-February.  I cranked up the magnification in the zoom to 33x and then 50x, but it didn't reveal any more detail.  I estimated the size at maybe 10 arcmins with a DC of 2.  I didn't make a magnitude estimate but reports are putting it at 8.3--it's fading fast.

 

Sorry about my earlier report--expectations ran into reality in a hurried observation.


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#57 Aquarellia

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 10:14 AM

You'r right Michael, the numberous stars of the MilkyWay doesn't help the perception of this comet during the fading period for us.

I'm sorry to ear that in the USA the weather is so complicate, it's not to make you jalous but here south France we have a full week close to 25°C,... illogical but it's very easy to sketch we feel as in the summer.

 

Here my 3 last sketches and the related distance in AU :

 

C2018Y1_20190220_ll.jpg

 

0.43 AU

 

C2018Y1_20190222_ll.jpg

 

0.49 AU

 

Feb. 24th, 0.55 AU too much stars, I was not motivate to sketch this

 

C2018Y1_20190226_ll.jpg

 

0.61 AU

 

Clear sky to you all

Michel


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#58 Don H

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 12:59 PM

Had some nice views of the comet last night using both 4.5 and 10 inch reflectors. The small reflector was able to frame M38, the comet, and M36 in the same fov. It was quite a treat. The 8x50 finder on the 10 inch showed them all, too, but the comet was not as obvious. The 10 showed some fine detail, and the appearance of NGC 1907 close to M38 added a little bonus.


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#59 Special Ed

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 09:34 PM

@ Michel--great set of sketches showing the evolution of the comet.  smile.gif   Enjoy the weather while you can--25C--that's about 75F?  We're headed for minus Celsius temps here in a couple of days.  That's where the average comes from.  lol.gif 

 

@ Don--good report.  You did a lot better than I did.  smile.gif 



#60 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 08:01 AM

Took this image last evening of Comet Iwamoto with open clusters M38 and NGC 1907 with the Slooh C3 Astrograph.

 

Rich (RLTYS)

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • C 2018 Y1 Iwamoto C3 2-28-19r.png

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#61 jodemur

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 09:52 AM

Took this image last evening of Comet Iwamoto with open clusters M38 and NGC 1907 with the Slooh C3 Astrograph.

 

Rich (RLTYS)

 

Really cool photo of a night sky smorgasbord. Thanks for sharing Rich!




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