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Saw the Horsehead, G1, and some other stuff

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#1 Augustus

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 09:25 PM

Tonight I was planning on bagging some more Herschel 400 objects with the 20", but somehow managed to not go after a single one. I got distracted - what can I say?

 

Some of the stuff I saw:

  • M38
  • M42
  • Moon - Fantastic with the 5mm, like flying over it in a spaceship.
  • ACO 426 - NGC 1272, 1275, and 1278 visible. May have seen 1270 - not sure.
  • NGC 1232 - Somewhat visible, fairly large.
  • NGC 1297 - Barely visible.
  • NGC 1300 - Somewhat dim, some faint bar/spiral structure perhaps?

The real highlights, though, were the Horsehead and G1. 

 

I went after the Horsehead just for giggles, hoping to at least spot IC 434. IC 434 appeared as a relatively easy to see elongated wisp of nebulosity with the UHC (I have no H-beta filter). I then started looking for B33, using a pair of 7th-magnitude and a 12th-magnitude star just below the horse's mane as references. Sure enough, I could just see a dark intrusion on IC 434! Not obvious, but unmistakable.

 

G1 was the last object I bagged in the session. I could just make out the "Mickey Mouse" shape at low power and at high power it was slightly fuzzy. 


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#2 Aaron_tragle

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 09:47 PM

That is amazing to hear Augustus! My eyes are finally recovering from the damage done to them and I spotted the flame from B5 as a smudge, with the damage I was barely able to see it in B3. How was M42 in the 20"?


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#3 TOMDEY

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 09:47 PM

Wow! It's clear and 8 degrees F now... Hmmm... Uhhh... Maybe just a few minutes... But that pesky Dark Adaptation!    Tom


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#4 Pete W

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:33 AM

NGC’s 1232, 1297 & 1300...impressive snags in CT!  


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#5 Augustus

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:57 AM

That is amazing to hear Augustus! My eyes are finally recovering from the damage done to them and I spotted the flame from B5 as a smudge, with the damage I was barely able to see it in B3. How was M42 in the 20"?

I got the Flame a while back with the UHC. M42 is absurd. Like the photos drained (mostly) of color, but better. Flying around it at ~500x with a 1mm exit pupil is incredible (Moon is awesome too but I've had to look at it through trees).

 

NGC’s 1232, 1297 & 1300...impressive snags in CT!  

Really? I was a little dismayed as to how dim they are. O'Meara calls 1232 a "showpiece" object in his Hidden Treasures book.



#6 Pete W

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 11:21 AM

...I was a little dismayed as to how dim they are. O'Meara calls 1232 a "showpiece" object in his Hidden Treasures book.

 

How's your southern horizon light pollution-wise?  The surface brightnesses of these three are quite low - much lower than most Messier spirals - so seeing these low-altitude galaxies if they are situated in a light dome is an accomplishment, even in a 20".  IIRC, O'Meara's owl-like exit pupils are observing from pristine Hawaiian skies at a latitude of about 20 degrees.  In my experience O'Meara's descriptions are unrealistic for most observers.   With an 18" under West TX skies details in 1232 (SB of 13.9) and 1300 (SB of 13.8) are elusive: 1232 with averted imagination hints at knots in the disk, but only because I "know" they are there; while 1300's bar is obvious, but the curving arms are very challenging with AV.


Edited by Pete W, 12 January 2019 - 11:23 AM.

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