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1 mm pinhole telescope imaging in Orion and The Pleiades.

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#1 Jason H.

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 12:51 PM

Hello, I had previously posted on CN an experiment in imaging the Moon and Sun with a 1 mm pinhole and promised that I would post any other experiments I might do with it.  The attached image shows some of the other recent experiments I've done with it in Orion and the Pleiades.  The captions explain the details.  The children's telescope/finder could do much better (and easier) on Orion than the pinhole, but the pinhole's much more fun (for me), and perhaps the first time these targets have been imaged this way at this scale?  (primitive as it is.)

 

Clear skies and good seeing!  Jason Higley

 

Pinhole Astro Imaging by Jason Higley.jpg


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#2 medderx

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 01:53 PM

Looks like the FSQ-85EDX has some competition haha. Next you should try a film canister pinhole camera for ultra-widefield and have it exposed the whole night. 

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#3 Jason H.

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 12:08 PM

Looks like the FSQ-85EDX has some competition haha. Next you should try a film canister pinhole camera for ultra-widefield and have it exposed the whole night. 

The FSQ cannot do what this does (tee hee hee  :^)  (no lens refraction, true FOV (no image flipping or inversion), no photon absorption or dispersion by glass in the image path, no false color from glass, no spherical aberration/field curvature, no change in photon polarization, 'seeing' cells always larger than aperture, ambient temperature reached instantly, no dew zapper needed, no cleaning, sleak-proof, no coating failures or degradation, it's $3300 cheaper, no solar filter needed (if exposure is 1/4000th of a second or shorter), extreme focal length/image scale relative to aperture, and true difraction limited performance.)

 

Regarding the film canister, do you happen to have an image from a film canister that was exposed the whole night?  I've seen Sun exposures over long periods of time (months), but not night time ones.

 

Jason Higley


Edited by Jason H., 13 January 2019 - 12:13 PM.


#4 Mike I. Jones

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 05:32 PM

Umm, the image from a pinhole camera is inverted.  The image brightness also falls off per the cosine^4 law, so for a uniform sky brightness over the FOV, the corners will always be darker than the center.  But still, I really like your pinhole camera M42 picture!


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#5 medderx

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 08:29 PM

no i dont, the ones where its a timelapse of the sun i believe were done with very low iso film, if you get something like 1600iso i think it would be possible. I will try to remember to give it a try this summer when I am at a dark sky site and just tape it to my scope or counterweight shaft, maybe do another on just a tripod to get the whole polaris star trail type image. 


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#6 Jason H.

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 09:24 PM

Umm, the image from a pinhole camera is inverted.  The image brightness also falls off per the cosine^4 law, so for a uniform sky brightness over the FOV, the corners will always be darker than the center.  But still, I really like your pinhole camera M42 picture!

That is fascinating, yes, I recall having seen diagrams of camera obscura doing that, however, all images I've taken with pinholes in the Canon T6i are correctly oriented, and so I forgot about that (perhaps the Canon camera software does an image-erect when a lens is not detected as being attached?)  Attached is 1/5th of a second exposure at ISO 12,800 (reduced in size to fit here) of a nearby outdoor light on my house that I used during that same session to make sure the 1 mm pinhole was illuminating the chip (and the lamp points down and at that angle in actuality.)  I've also done both daytime outdoor pinhole photography and shot images of text indoors using several different pinholes, and all of them were readable (normally oriented) so I've never had to flip them in the image post-processing software (hence my forgetting about flipped images by cameras obscura.)

 

Jason H.

 

IMG_0831.png



#7 gr5org

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 04:54 PM

All camera lenses invert the image.  Just like a pin hole.  So the camera doesn't have to detect if there is a lens on it or not.


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#8 mic1970

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 01:47 PM

Hello, I had previously posted on CN an experiment in imaging the Moon and Sun with a 1 mm pinhole and promised that I would post any other experiments I might do with it.  The attached image shows some of the other recent experiments I've done with it in Orion and the Pleiades.  The captions explain the details.  The children's telescope/finder could do much better (and easier) on Orion than the pinhole, but the pinhole's much more fun (for me), and perhaps the first time these targets have been imaged this way at this scale?  (primitive as it is.)

 

Clear skies and good seeing!  Jason Higley

 

 

Awesome... can you post the link to the first one?


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#9 MartinPond

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 12:39 AM

So cool.......


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#10 highfnum

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 04:27 PM

very interesting 

what would f num be for 1mm ?


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#11 gr5org

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 05:46 PM

very interesting 

what would f num be for 1mm ?

Good question.  From the images it looks like about a 500mm focal length so about F/500!   Very faint.  Camera's these days are pretty amazing but it helps that the moon is lit up with direct sunlight.  Orion nebula not so much.


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#12 Jason H.

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 06:41 PM

Awesome... can you post the link to the first one?

This is one of the posts that was most relevant to the subject I think 

"research grade" laser-drilled 1 mm pinhole image of the Moon via Canon T6i Started by Jason H., Aug 05 2018 07:26 AM"

https://www.cloudyni...le#entry8760026

 

The attached image from that thread is the one I liked most.

AnnotatedMoonPinholeImages.jpg

 

I've also posted a few other posts on pinhole astronomy and diffraction optics if you do an all forum search on "jason h pinhole" and "jason h diffraction"

 

Clear skies and good seeing, Jason H.



#13 Jason H.

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 06:54 PM

highfnum, on 18 Jan 2019 - 4:27 PM, said:

"very interesting

what would f num be for 1mm ?

and a response was

Good question.  From the images it looks like about a 500mm focal length so about F/500!   Very faint.  Camera's these days are pretty amazing but it helps that the moon is lit up with direct sunlight.  Orion nebula not so much.

Yes that was a good estimate!  The actual focal length for the 1mm pinhole is ~562mm.  I arrived at that by using this calculator http://mrpinhole.com/calcpinh.php

 

Regards, Jason H.




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