Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

My honest review of the 52 degree from Explore Scientific.

  • Please log in to reply
148 replies to this topic

#1 Tylerbo

Tylerbo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 127
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Springdale ARK

Posted 14 January 2019 - 09:59 AM

I’ve had the opportunity to try out some of Explore Scientific’s new line of 52° eyepieces.  I must say I am always blown away by what Explore Scientific is doing as a company.

These eyepieces are of excellent quality and the optical performance is quite amazing indeed.  These eyepieces are great for planetary views, bringing in detail with the moon that I haven’t seen in a while.  Mars is also fantastic!  Seeing the ice cap on Mars was truly remarkable.

The detail I am able to acquire with all of the longer focal length eyepieces in this series is truly astounding.  I can easily split Albireo with these eyepieces as well as Polaris A and Polaris B.

Using the 40mm and the 30mm eyepieces with my Orion ST120, I was able to fit the entirety of the Pleiades inside the field of view and experienced only slight distortion towards the edge of the FOV.  Observing these beautiful bright stars is simply breathtaking.  Using these eyepieces to star hop, I did not have to worry about light scatter on either of them.  I could just sit there and take in everything the view had to offer with no worries at all. Moving over to M33, I could see the central core brightening within a nice slanted cloudy patch of light. The NGC’s 869 and 884 (Double Cluster) is sharp will a little bit of distortion towards the outer edge.  Compared to a GSO SuperView 30mm eyepiece, the Explore Scientific 52° 30mm seems to offer more depth of field.

The 25mm eyepiece had no problem finding and displaying M1 (Crab Nebula) with good contrast compared to a generic Plössl of the same focal length. The Explore Scientific eyepiece lets in more darkness (better contrast) and it has the advantage for sure over the Plössl, even in an f/5 scope.  I did note a little bit of distortion at the edge of the field, but I had to go looking for it.  While observing M1, it was not noticed. If I were to choose a jewel amongst the 52° series that I have evaluated so far, the 25mm would be a close second.

The 20mm eyepiece in this 52° series had no notable distortion at the edge of the field. While observing the brighter stars of the Pleiades, I was able to discern the soft and subtle glow of nebulosity.  Swapping out for a 20mm Plössl, a similar view was had, but the edge of field distortion in this fast scope was much more noticeable.  The Explore Scientific eyepiece was much better corrected for this fast refractor.  Swinging over to M42 (Orion Nebula), nice contrast was offered despite the lower altitude of this object.  Four of the Trapezium stars could be easily picked out.  This eyepiece offered sharp stars from center to edge.

The 52° 15mm, when compared to a GSO Plössl of the same focal length, has much better eye relief and offered a more immersive visual experience.  The field of view with this eyepiece is very well corrected for my fast scope.  An attempt at Mars was made, but with this planet rapidly receding and getting much smaller, the view was not especially remarkable here.  Poor seeing conditions were also impactful with the planet.  Moving up to M31, (Andromeda Galaxy), the 52° 15mm was definitely superior to the GSO 15mm.  Again, excellent contrast and immersive viewing experience.  The field stop on the Plössl was quite noticeable, whereas the 52° was smooth and the field stop did not interfere with the light path.  Sliding southward to the Cetus/Eridanus area, comet 46P/Wirtanen clawed its way through the worsening transparency and was easily seen.  The 52° again offered better contrast vs. the Plössl.  M42 presented a fine view as well.  Moving to M45 (Pleiades), the pinpoint stars, even to the edge, was amazing.  In Auriga, M37 displayed a fine sprinkling of diamond dust with a brighter red star nested in the center.  Back to M1, this small little cloudy patch of light was easily picked out despite the worsening sky conditions.  In my honest opinion, the 52° 15mm is hands-down the crown jewel in this series that I have tried so far.  It has little to no distortion at the edge, and stars remain as sharp pinpoints across the entirety of the field of view, an excellent eyepiece.

These eyepieces all come inside Explore Scientific’s great boxes.  Inside of each box, the eyepiece is held warmly in a little soft black velvet pouch for added protection, a nice touch.

While looking through these eyepieces at the scope, I did not experience any eye-strain.  They offered a clear view of what I was looking at with nice contrast and no noticeable light scatter.  The 52° AFOV was expansive enough to hold an object for observing finer detail even when using a manual alt/az mount.

The 6.5mm brings out all the beauty in the Double Cluster.  The contrast was great and I can easily make out the copper color of the red stars.  I compared this eyepiece to a 6mm Fujiyama KK HD Orthoscopic eyepiece with a slightly narrower apparent field of view, as well as a 6mm Baader Classic Ortho.  The KK 6mm has a sharper image and the center to edge is definitely noticeable in the KK and the BCO.  The 6.5mm does show a lot of contrast in the nebulosity, but, moving to the ES 52° 4.5mm, the contrast is diminished, and even more so with the 3mm.

In my opinion, the 3mm would be great for planetary and lunar on nights of excellent seeing conditions with the scope that was used for this review.  While observing the Orion Nebula (M42), I can make out the 4 main stars of the Trapezium Cluster and its very well corrected and also very nice to edge.

Using the Orion ST120, the 6.5mm performed very well.  On M42, the four brighter stars of the Trapezium Cluster popped out really well and the center to edge was amazing as well.  The 3mm and the 6.5mm in the ST120 are great eyepieces.  The 3mm can split Polaris which I found amazing being the first time that I’ve seen the secondary star of this pair.  M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) through the 6.5mm showed contrast that just pops in the center which I found to be very nice.  The 4.5mm makes it so much sweeter as it picked up some dust lanes with no problem.  Back to M42, I can make out a fifth star in the Trapezium Cluster which is exciting.

In my opinion, the 52° series is a great set to have in one’s collection or if just starting out in this great hobby.  The eye relief is quite adequate in my experience.  I did not have to hug the eyepiece to see the objects and I typically wear glasses when I am able to bring out the telescope for nightly viewing.  I feel that one of the best aspects of these eyepieces is the minimal maintenance required with them.  Cleaning (when required) is very easy since they are waterproof.  The removable eyecup allows for easier cleaning also.  The anti-fogging coating is a winner too in my book.  What is not to love about these eyepieces?

They would be excellent as a beginner set if you are just starting out in the hobby, or even if you are an experienced astronomer looking to enhance the eyepiece collection you can’t go wrong.

 

40mm:  Great for star hopping and seeing open clusters and larger deep sky objects, such as M45 (Pleiades) and M31 (Andromeda Galaxy).

Exit pupil:  8mm

Eye Relief:  27mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  2"

Eyepiece:  Fixed 

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  35mm

Focal Length:  40mm

 

30mm:  Star hopping and zooming in on the Double Cluster along with a closer look at M45 (Pleiades) and M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) and could almost split Polaris.

Eye Relief:  20mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece:  Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  26.2mm

Focal Length:  30mm

 

25mm:  M34 fits in the eyepiece rather nicely and make the sky a little darker, increasing contrast, which is great. Being able to gaze M35 or NGC 2099 is amazing.

Eye Relief:  16mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  21.8mm

Focal Length:  25mm

 

20mm:  Brings in more contrast.

Eye Relief:  15mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece:  Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  19.4mm

Focal Length:  20mm

 

15mm:  Offers the best picture of M34, the best open cluster in Perseus.  I could count the stars in M36 in Auriga with all the great detail this eyepiece offered.

Eye Relief:  16mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece:  Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  19.4mm

Focal Length:  15mm

 

3mm: good detail in the Trapezium cluster and corrected to edge. Polaris can be split

Barrel Size: 1.25"

Focal Length:3mm

Apparent Field of View: 52°

Eye Relief: 15mm

Field Stop: 5mm

 

4.5mm: Brings in more contrast in the Andromeda Galaxy.

Barrel Size: 1.25"

Focal Length: 4.5mm

Apparent Field of View: 52°

Eye Relief: 15mm

Field Stop: 15.5mm

 

6.5mm: Andromeda galaxy has great detail the contrast just pops

Barrel Size: 1.25"

Focal Length: 6.5mm

Apparent Field of View: 52°

Eye Relief: 15.9mm

Field Stop: 17.4mm


Edited by Tylerbo, 14 January 2019 - 10:04 AM.

  • JIMZ7, george tatsis, eros312 and 12 others like this

#2 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,125
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 14 January 2019 - 11:44 AM

I have the 6.5mm ES52 and had a chance to use it last night for an extended observing session along with a group of 6.5mm-7mm eyepieces.  I think this eyepiece is excellent.  It was sharp to the field stop in a 120mm f/7.5 APO,  61mm f/6 APO, and 90mm f/10 achromat.  

 

The 6.5mm ES52 is very comfortable, actually has enough eye relief for my glasses if I don't feel like taking them off, and has excellent sky contrast. 

 

Regarding your assessment that the 15mm is the gem of the line.  I would caution you to be careful with that conclusion using a 120mm f/5 achromat.   A 15mm gives a 3mm exit pupil which is into a range where it gives a lot of image brightness and resolution without having a washed out sky background that comes with a larger exit pupil.  It is also not to a point where the chromatic aberration of the scope is causing serious loss of contrast.  This may also be why you found the contrast diminished with the 4.5mm and 3mm.   The CA reduces contrast and with the 120mm f/5 that becomes quite significant at the magnifications you get with the 4.5mm and 3mm.


  • BFaucett and Tylerbo like this

#3 M11Mike

M11Mike

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,108
  • Joined: 02 Apr 2016
  • Loc: Ballston Lake, NY

Posted 14 January 2019 - 11:46 AM

Appears to be a Plossl….with the (4) elements, 52 degree FOV, and relationship between FL and ER.  

 

ES was missing the boat in the non-widefield area....previously concentrating on the more sophisticated & costly 68/82/92/100 degree EP lines

 

Smart move for them IMHO to add the 52 degree to their product offering.  As W. Paolini states in his excellent EP book (Choosing and Using Astronomical Eyepieces" - "less glass is sometimes just as good or better" depending on the scope being used, the target and observing conditions. 

 

M11Mike     


  • pao and Tylerbo like this

#4 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,125
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 14 January 2019 - 12:19 PM

Appears to be a Plossl….with the (4) elements, 52 degree FOV, and relationship between FL and ER.  

 

ES was missing the boat in the non-widefield area....previously concentrating on the more sophisticated & costly 68/82/92/100 degree EP lines

 

Smart move for them IMHO to add the 52 degree to their product offering.  As W. Paolini states in his excellent EP book (Choosing and Using Astronomical Eyepieces" - "less glass is sometimes just as good or better" depending on the scope being used, the target and observing conditions. 

 

M11Mike     

Definitely not a plossl.  The 6.5mm has a Smyth group at the bottom of the barrel.  Eye relief is too long for a 6.5mm plossl as I can use glasses without any top surface contact.  And the sharp to the field stop performance in a 61mm f/6 doublet APO is non-plossl like performance.  The 6.5mm reminds me of the 6mm Zhumell Z series planetary with better scatter control and easier exit pupil.  


  • nicoledoula and Tylerbo like this

#5 Tylerbo

Tylerbo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 127
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Springdale ARK

Posted 14 January 2019 - 12:46 PM

I have the 6.5mm ES52 and had a chance to use it last night for an extended observing session along with a group of 6.5mm-7mm eyepieces.  I think this eyepiece is excellent.  It was sharp to the field stop in a 120mm f/7.5 APO,  61mm f/6 APO, and 90mm f/10 achromat.  

 

The 6.5mm ES52 is very comfortable, actually has enough eye relief for my glasses if I don't feel like taking them off, and has excellent sky contrast. 

 

Regarding your assessment that the 15mm is the gem of the line.  I would caution you to be careful with that conclusion using a 120mm f/5 achromat.   A 15mm gives a 3mm exit pupil which is into a range where it gives a lot of image brightness and resolution without having a washed out sky background that comes with a larger exit pupil.  It is also not to a point where the chromatic aberration of the scope is causing serious loss of contrast.  This may also be why you found the contrast diminished with the 4.5mm and 3mm.   The CA reduces contrast and with the 120mm f/5 that becomes quite significant at the magnifications you get with the 4.5mm and 3mm.

Thank you for the heads up 



#6 nicoledoula

nicoledoula

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,180
  • Joined: 31 Jan 2018

Posted 14 January 2019 - 02:35 PM

The 15mm on down are not 4 element EP's. I'm just wondering how the OP saw a field stop in the GSO 15mm plossl, did GSO fix that? Liking the edge correction reports at F/5 in a refractor. 



#7 Tylerbo

Tylerbo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 127
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Springdale ARK

Posted 14 January 2019 - 03:26 PM

It was a much older Gso ep plossl


  • Levine and nicoledoula like this

#8 Spacefreak1974

Spacefreak1974

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,483
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2015
  • Loc: Indianapolis, IN

Posted 14 January 2019 - 03:36 PM

I bought the 6.5 for my son for Christmas for use in his short 4.5 newtonian. He's 9, but has taken a lot of interest. I have the 11 and 30mm in the 82 degree line and I found the 52 deg 6.5 to be as well constructed. Is as heavily built as the 11mm 82 and has a similar eyecup design

 

I think these will be a great win for ES


  • iKMN, nicoledoula and Tylerbo like this

#9 iKMN

iKMN

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Joined: 03 Aug 2015
  • Loc: South Florida

Posted 14 January 2019 - 05:22 PM

I bought the 6.5 for my son for Christmas for use in his short 4.5 newtonian. He's 9, but has taken a lot of interest. I have the 11 and 30mm in the 82 degree line and I found the 52 deg 6.5 to be as well constructed. Is as heavily built as the 11mm 82 and has a similar eyecup design

 

I think these will be a great win for ES

Thanks for posting this.  I need to find a cost effective set for my 12 y/o daughter ED80 F/6..  I was literally going to post a thread today about the 52s...and saw this thread pop up.  Thanks OP and Spacefreak.  


  • nicoledoula and Tylerbo like this

#10 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,125
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 14 January 2019 - 05:26 PM

Definitely not a plossl.  The 6.5mm has a Smyth group at the bottom of the barrel.  Eye relief is too long for a 6.5mm plossl as I can use glasses without any top surface contact.  And the sharp to the field stop performance in a 61mm f/6 doublet APO is non-plossl like performance.  The 6.5mm reminds me of the 6mm Zhumell Z series planetary with better scatter control and easier exit pupil.  

I need to modify what I said here a little.  On the explore scientific page the 10mm, 6.5mm, 4.5mm, and 3mm ES52's are listed as 6 elements in 3 groups.  The 20mm is 5 elements in 3 groups and the 25mm, 30mm and 40mm are 4 elements in 2 groups.  So the long focal lengths probably are plossls.   The specs for the 15mm are not clear yet, but I suspect that one will also be 6 elements in 3 groups based upon the OP's review.


  • BFaucett, nicoledoula and Tylerbo like this

#11 Tylerbo

Tylerbo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 127
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Springdale ARK

Posted 14 January 2019 - 05:29 PM

Thanks for posting this.  I need to find a cost effective set for my 12 y/o daughter ED80 F/6..  I was literally going to post a thread today about the 52s...and saw this thread pop up.  Thanks OP and Spacefreak.  

I'm glad I could help out.



#12 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 52,044
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 14 January 2019 - 06:46 PM

I’ve had the opportunity to try out some of Explore Scientific’s new line of 52° eyepieces.  I must say I am always blown away by what Explore Scientific is doing as a company.

These eyepieces are of excellent quality and the optical performance is quite amazing indeed.  These eyepieces are great for planetary views, bringing in detail with the moon that I haven’t seen in a while.  Mars is also fantastic!  Seeing the ice cap on Mars was truly remarkable.

The detail I am able to acquire with all of the longer focal length eyepieces in this series is truly astounding.  I can easily split Albireo with these eyepieces as well as Polaris A and Polaris B.

Using the 40mm and the 30mm eyepieces with my Orion ST120, I was able to fit the entirety of the Pleiades inside the field of view and experienced only slight distortion towards the edge of the FOV.  Observing these beautiful bright stars is simply breathtaking.  Using these eyepieces to star hop, I did not have to worry about light scatter on either of them.  I could just sit there and take in everything the view had to offer with no worries at all. Moving over to M33, I could see the central core brightening within a nice slanted cloudy patch of light. The NGC’s 869 and 884 (Double Cluster) is sharp will a little bit of distortion towards the outer edge.  Compared to a GSO SuperView 30mm eyepiece, the Explore Scientific 52° 30mm seems to offer more depth of field.

The 25mm eyepiece had no problem finding and displaying M1 (Crab Nebula) with good contrast compared to a generic Plössl of the same focal length. The Explore Scientific eyepiece lets in more darkness (better contrast) and it has the advantage for sure over the Plössl, even in an f/5 scope.  I did note a little bit of distortion at the edge of the field, but I had to go looking for it.  While observing M1, it was not noticed. If I were to choose a jewel amongst the 52° series that I have evaluated so far, the 25mm would be a close second.

The 20mm eyepiece in this 52° series had no notable distortion at the edge of the field. While observing the brighter stars of the Pleiades, I was able to discern the soft and subtle glow of nebulosity.  Swapping out for a 20mm Plössl, a similar view was had, but the edge of field distortion in this fast scope was much more noticeable.  The Explore Scientific eyepiece was much better corrected for this fast refractor.  Swinging over to M42 (Orion Nebula), nice contrast was offered despite the lower altitude of this object.  Four of the Trapezium stars could be easily picked out.  This eyepiece offered sharp stars from center to edge.

The 52° 15mm, when compared to a GSO Plössl of the same focal length, has much better eye relief and offered a more immersive visual experience.  The field of view with this eyepiece is very well corrected for my fast scope.  An attempt at Mars was made, but with this planet rapidly receding and getting much smaller, the view was not especially remarkable here.  Poor seeing conditions were also impactful with the planet.  Moving up to M31, (Andromeda Galaxy), the 52° 15mm was definitely superior to the GSO 15mm.  Again, excellent contrast and immersive viewing experience.  The field stop on the Plössl was quite noticeable, whereas the 52° was smooth and the field stop did not interfere with the light path.  Sliding southward to the Cetus/Eridanus area, comet 46P/Wirtanen clawed its way through the worsening transparency and was easily seen.  The 52° again offered better contrast vs. the Plössl.  M42 presented a fine view as well.  Moving to M45 (Pleiades), the pinpoint stars, even to the edge, was amazing.  In Auriga, M37 displayed a fine sprinkling of diamond dust with a brighter red star nested in the center.  Back to M1, this small little cloudy patch of light was easily picked out despite the worsening sky conditions.  In my honest opinion, the 52° 15mm is hands-down the crown jewel in this series that I have tried so far.  It has little to no distortion at the edge, and stars remain as sharp pinpoints across the entirety of the field of view, an excellent eyepiece.

These eyepieces all come inside Explore Scientific’s great boxes.  Inside of each box, the eyepiece is held warmly in a little soft black velvet pouch for added protection, a nice touch.

While looking through these eyepieces at the scope, I did not experience any eye-strain.  They offered a clear view of what I was looking at with nice contrast and no noticeable light scatter.  The 52° AFOV was expansive enough to hold an object for observing finer detail even when using a manual alt/az mount.

The 6.5mm brings out all the beauty in the Double Cluster.  The contrast was great and I can easily make out the copper color of the red stars.  I compared this eyepiece to a 6mm Fujiyama KK HD Orthoscopic eyepiece with a slightly narrower apparent field of view, as well as a 6mm Baader Classic Ortho.  The KK 6mm has a sharper image and the center to edge is definitely noticeable in the KK and the BCO.  The 6.5mm does show a lot of contrast in the nebulosity, but, moving to the ES 52° 4.5mm, the contrast is diminished, and even more so with the 3mm.

In my opinion, the 3mm would be great for planetary and lunar on nights of excellent seeing conditions with the scope that was used for this review.  While observing the Orion Nebula (M42), I can make out the 4 main stars of the Trapezium Cluster and its very well corrected and also very nice to edge.

Using the Orion ST120, the 6.5mm performed very well.  On M42, the four brighter stars of the Trapezium Cluster popped out really well and the center to edge was amazing as well.  The 3mm and the 6.5mm in the ST120 are great eyepieces.  The 3mm can split Polaris which I found amazing being the first time that I’ve seen the secondary star of this pair.  M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) through the 6.5mm showed contrast that just pops in the center which I found to be very nice.  The 4.5mm makes it so much sweeter as it picked up some dust lanes with no problem.  Back to M42, I can make out a fifth star in the Trapezium Cluster which is exciting.

In my opinion, the 52° series is a great set to have in one’s collection or if just starting out in this great hobby.  The eye relief is quite adequate in my experience.  I did not have to hug the eyepiece to see the objects and I typically wear glasses when I am able to bring out the telescope for nightly viewing.  I feel that one of the best aspects of these eyepieces is the minimal maintenance required with them.  Cleaning (when required) is very easy since they are waterproof.  The removable eyecup allows for easier cleaning also.  The anti-fogging coating is a winner too in my book.  What is not to love about these eyepieces?

They would be excellent as a beginner set if you are just starting out in the hobby, or even if you are an experienced astronomer looking to enhance the eyepiece collection you can’t go wrong.

 

40mm:  Great for star hopping and seeing open clusters and larger deep sky objects, such as M45 (Pleiades) and M31 (Andromeda Galaxy).

Exit pupil:  8mm

Eye Relief:  27mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  2"

Eyepiece:  Fixed 

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  35mm

Focal Length:  40mm

 

30mm:  Star hopping and zooming in on the Double Cluster along with a closer look at M45 (Pleiades) and M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) and could almost split Polaris.

Eye Relief:  20mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece:  Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  26.2mm

Focal Length:  30mm

 

25mm:  M34 fits in the eyepiece rather nicely and make the sky a little darker, increasing contrast, which is great. Being able to gaze M35 or NGC 2099 is amazing.

Eye Relief:  16mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  21.8mm

Focal Length:  25mm

 

20mm:  Brings in more contrast.

Eye Relief:  15mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece:  Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  19.4mm

Focal Length:  20mm

 

15mm:  Offers the best picture of M34, the best open cluster in Perseus.  I could count the stars in M36 in Auriga with all the great detail this eyepiece offered.

Eye Relief:  16mm

Eyepiece Barrel Size:  1.25"

Eyepiece:  Fixed

Apparent Field of View:  52°

Field Stop Diameter:  19.4mm

Focal Length:  15mm

 

3mm: good detail in the Trapezium cluster and corrected to edge. Polaris can be split

Barrel Size: 1.25"

Focal Length:3mm

Apparent Field of View: 52°

Eye Relief: 15mm

Field Stop: 5mm

 

4.5mm: Brings in more contrast in the Andromeda Galaxy.

Barrel Size: 1.25"

Focal Length: 4.5mm

Apparent Field of View: 52°

Eye Relief: 15mm

Field Stop: 15.5mm

 

6.5mm: Andromeda galaxy has great detail the contrast just pops

Barrel Size: 1.25"

Focal Length: 6.5mm

Apparent Field of View: 52°

Eye Relief: 15.9mm

Field Stop: 17.4mm

Do you work for Explore Scientific?  

Where did you get a 15mm 52° to test, since they aren't released yet?

I would also want to note that suitability for glasses wearers will depend on the thickness of the glasses, the distances from the lens to the eye and how deep-set the person's eyes are.

Only the 30mm and 40mm worked for me with glasses on, though they're all comfortable without.


  • scotsman328i, Ernest_SPB, Rainguy and 4 others like this

#13 leonard

leonard

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,345
  • Joined: 19 Oct 2007
  • Loc: West Virginia

Posted 14 January 2019 - 08:53 PM

Do you work for Explore Scientific?  

 

 

           It’s an honest review .           



#14 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 52,044
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 14 January 2019 - 09:09 PM

Could be.

#15 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Viking 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 912
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 14 January 2019 - 09:20 PM

Do you work for Explore Scientific?  

Where did you get a 15mm 52° to test, since they aren't released yet?

I would also want to note that suitability for glasses wearers will depend on the thickness of the glasses, the distances from the lens to the eye and how deep-set the person's eyes are.

Only the 30mm and 40mm worked for me with glasses on, though they're all comfortable without.

Tyler does not work for Explore Scientific, last I heard.  I suspect he visited ES and had an opportunity to play with these new eyepieces.  Thanks for the review, Tyler.  It is amazing how a good eyepiece can significantly improve your viewing experience, isn't it?  smile.gif

 

Patrick

 

EDIT:  I went to the ES website and all these eyepieces seem to be available including the 15mm 52°.


Edited by PatrickVt, 14 January 2019 - 09:48 PM.

  • BFaucett, nicoledoula and Tylerbo like this

#16 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Viking 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 912
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 14 January 2019 - 09:53 PM

Now that I'm taking a closer look at this line of eyepieces, I'm actually considering that four piece 52° kit for a new Evostar 72mm I recently purchased.  I have yet to buy any eyepieces for it but have been borrowing from two other kits I have on hand.  

 

Patrick


  • nicoledoula and Tylerbo like this

#17 Jond105

Jond105

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,555
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Detroit

Posted 15 January 2019 - 02:13 AM

Do you work for Explore Scientific?
Where did you get a 15mm 52° to test, since they aren't released yet?
I would also want to note that suitability for glasses wearers will depend on the thickness of the glasses, the distances from the lens to the eye and how deep-set the person's eyes are.
Only the 30mm and 40mm worked for me with glasses on, though they're all comfortable without.


I can tell your right now being friends with Tyler he does not work for them. I know he knows Kent? I believe his name is from ES living down in Arkansas and being part of a club. He did good for a first time write up on reviewing eyepieces. Just hoping he can get those pieces in some other scopes to test out for people. Faster dobs, and slower Refractors/mak/SCT. As the 120 f/5 is made for the wide field low power.
  • BFaucett and Tylerbo like this

#18 Tylerbo

Tylerbo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 127
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Springdale ARK

Posted 15 January 2019 - 07:38 AM

Do you work for Explore Scientific?  

 

 

           It’s an honest review .           

i Work for Tyson foods maintenance department 


  • careysub, BFaucett, The Luckster and 3 others like this

#19 Tylerbo

Tylerbo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 127
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Springdale ARK

Posted 15 January 2019 - 07:41 AM

Do you work for Explore Scientific?  

Where did you get a 15mm 52° to test, since they aren't released yet?

I would also want to note that suitability for glasses wearers will depend on the thickness of the glasses, the distances from the lens to the eye and how deep-set the person's eyes are.

Only the 30mm and 40mm worked for me with glasses on, though they're all comfortable without.

I don’t work for explore but I use the resources that I have in my own back yard that’s for sure. I wear glasses to and they were comfortable to use while I was using the EP. Scott had a 15mm on hand that I borrowed I hope they come out soon, last I checked they were being shipped.


  • BFaucett likes this

#20 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 52,044
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 15 January 2019 - 10:53 AM

Yes, the 15mm have just cleared QC and are shipping today.  Good timing on the review.

You can see why I wondered, given your address, if you worked for ES.

Since you're there, you can be our spy for the new products coming out..........grin.gif


  • CelestronDaddy, Allanbarth1, Ohmless and 2 others like this

#21 rowdy388

rowdy388

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,391
  • Joined: 09 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Saratoga County, NY

Posted 15 January 2019 - 11:27 AM

Psssttt! When is that next 92 coming out? If you can't talk right now, tap it out in morse code. 


  • astronome, CelestronDaddy, Allanbarth1 and 2 others like this

#22 starcanoe

starcanoe

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,813
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Gulf Coast, Panhandle of Florida

Posted 15 January 2019 - 04:26 PM

That there is a 40mm in a 2 inch format is nice...those are not very common by ANY manufacturer...you almost always have to make the jump from a modest AFOV 32mm in a 1.25 format to a 50mm ish in a 2 inch format....


Edited by starcanoe, 15 January 2019 - 04:27 PM.

  • Orion68 and 25585 like this

#23 Jond105

Jond105

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,555
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Detroit

Posted 15 January 2019 - 04:46 PM

Psst.. find out about those LER ES82 degrees over in Europe. There's already been a thread started about those.
  • Crimsonhellkite and Tylerbo like this

#24 starcanoe

starcanoe

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,813
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Gulf Coast, Panhandle of Florida

Posted 15 January 2019 - 04:53 PM

i Work for Tyson foods maintenance department 

 

Well...at least the review wasn't everything "looks like chicken" :)


  • careysub, Glenilacqua, Spacefreak1974 and 1 other like this

#25 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 52,044
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 15 January 2019 - 05:05 PM

One note:

Field stop diameters equal focal length at a field of 1 radian, i.e. 57.3°.

At 52°, field stop diameters are smaller than the focal lengths.

Hence, ignore the quoted field stop diameters if they are larger than the focal length.

I get the following: focal length in mm/field stop diameter in mm

3.0 / 2.7
4.5 / 4.1
6.5 / 5.9
10.0 / 9.1
15.0 / 13.6
20.0 / 18.2
25.0 / 22.7
30.0 / 27.2
40.0 / 36.3

Note that some of the specs on the ES website are also incorrect.  They'll eventually correct them (they always do).


  • CelestronDaddy, Jond105 and Tylerbo like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics