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First serious attempt at Andromeda

astrophotography dslr imaging
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#1 F22Tech

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 05:17 AM

A few weeks ago I posted a basic generic attempt at Andromeda. After learning more with DSLR Astrophotography I took my first real attempt

at capturing all of the beauty.

 

Andromeda -
300 images stacked.
10 second exposures
Canon 75-300mm Lens (set to 300mm).
F5.6
ISO-1600
Canon T6-Rebel 1300D.
Bortle Class 4.
75% Moon intensity roughly.
(NO TELESCOPE). Just my camera and a 300mm lens.

Deepsky Stacker and Lightroom were used to process and such.

This is my first real attempt at capturing Andromeda. Will hopefully have a much better one Sunday night as it should be clear.

Over all, this is only around 48 minutes of exposures.
came out better than I expected.

 

(NOTE: used my tripod and mount for my Celestron Astromaster 114eq and a cheap 35 dollar Motor)... Didn't use the telescope though, just mounted my camera via a piece of wood and a proper threaded bolt to put my camera on it).

 

(NOTE -2: Due to having to shrink the image and adjusting jpg compression - there is slightly more noise on it).

 

(EDIT): I did 20 darks and 20 bias.

 

Andromeda_Smaller.jpg


Edited by F22Tech, 19 January 2019 - 05:19 AM.

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#2 elmiko

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 09:36 AM

Looks good David. Especially for the first time. Looks like you made good use of your equipment.

Don't forget to take flats.

Clear skies Mike


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#3 F22Tech

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 03:43 PM

Looks good David. Especially for the first time. Looks like you made good use of your equipment.

Don't forget to take flats.

Clear skies Mike

Thank you... Yeah I've been practicing on Orion quite a bit, it's like the easiest target for me to find, so I've been doing all my learning on it.

 

Yeah I've been wanting to take flats, but they somehow elude me, that's the one thing I've yet to learn as it seems the most complicated part of the entire thing, despite being so simple lol.

 

I know about the white T-Shirt method, but I never feel like waiting until a morning time to cover my lens up and let the natural light hit in and take photos and then process lol. (Or do you think my light in my room would work?)



#4 md11spotter98

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 09:21 PM

Nice shot! Excellent for a first "serious attempt."

 

For flat frames I use the T-shirt method with my laptop screen. I open a new image in my photo editor and zoom in so that most of the screen is white, then try to take 50+ flat frames.


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#5 Alen K

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 09:27 PM

That is a surprisingly severe amount of fall-off. I have never seen that much from a lens at 300mm. That much fall-off would look bad on terrestrial photos too (RAW format, because most cameras can compensate in JPEG format if the lens is a modern one). Do you see it in terrestrial photos? If not, something else went wrong. 


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#6 F22Tech

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 11:29 PM

Thanks for the Flat-Frame tips!

 

 

That is a surprisingly severe amount of fall-off. I have never seen that much from a lens at 300mm. That much fall-off would look bad on terrestrial photos too (RAW format, because most cameras can compensate in JPEG format if the lens is a modern one). Do you see it in terrestrial photos? If not, something else went wrong. 

The original image didn't have that issue. It came from Lightroom. I'm a Lightroom noob, so I have no idea how to compensate for that sort of stuff. The only Terrestrial images I have is from the moon one night and it came out wonderfully great.

 

It does annoy the heck out of me too.



#7 17.5Dob

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 11:34 PM

Stacking and stretching GREATLY accentuates any vignetting in the lens, The vignetting can be so minor, that you'd never even notice it in one frame, but multiply it 300X's and it becomes glaring.That's why you really need to shoot flats.


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#8 bobzeq25

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 11:57 PM

Thank you... Yeah I've been practicing on Orion quite a bit, it's like the easiest target for me to find, so I've been doing all my learning on it.

 

Yeah I've been wanting to take flats, but they somehow elude me, that's the one thing I've yet to learn as it seems the most complicated part of the entire thing, despite being so simple lol.

 

I know about the white T-Shirt method, but I never feel like waiting until a morning time to cover my lens up and let the natural light hit in and take photos and then process lol. (Or do you think my light in my room would work?)

When I started out I used an evenly illuminated wall.  It worked decently well.


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#9 F22Tech

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 03:02 AM

I will attempt flats after my session Sunday night.

Hopefully it stays clear smile.gif.

 

Thanks for the advice everyone, it really means a lot!

Also, on Twitter I shared this photo, and wow - people actually loved it!

 

I honestly wasn't super super impressed with it, but was happy with it as a first real attempt, but I never realized just how bad I viewed my own work, because apparently - normal people found it exceptional, even going against my words "attempt" and saying "That's no attempt, that's a huge success buddy.  Stunning!".

 

It really made me feel some confidence in my basic setup, I don't just do this because I enjoy it - I do enjoy it tons! But it brings me joy to show others.

 

I may be new to this whole thing, but I'm definitely in it for the long haul!


Edited by F22Tech, 20 January 2019 - 03:03 AM.

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#10 lynnelkriver

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 01:16 PM

Nice first image!  M31 was one of my first attempts at astrophotography and since then I've been trying to learn the ropes.  It's amazing how much help is on this website.  Scott


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#11 Alen K

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 01:45 PM

Sounds like flats should solve your issue. Otherwise a nice first serious attempt. One recommendation: Make your name a little less prominent by using a smaller font and putting it in a corner lower right or left). You don't want it to take away from the magnificence of the object you have photographed. 


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#12 F22Tech

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 04:39 PM

Nice first image!  M31 was one of my first attempts at astrophotography and since then I've been trying to learn the ropes.  It's amazing how much help is on this website.  Scott

Yeah this was one of my first as well. But my initial first couple of attempts were really just spending hours trying to find it, finally said screw it and made my lens 75mm so I could see more and find it that way lol.... I could capture it with my 18mm lens all day, but it's such a wide field of view it never seems to leave the stage of just looking like an orange blob no matter how much I stacked, even did 1200 2 second images in my 18mm lens and still looked the same as if it were a single image - if not worse.

 

 

Sounds like flats should solve your issue. Otherwise a nice first serious attempt. One recommendation: Make your name a little less prominent by using a smaller font and putting it in a corner lower right or left). You don't want it to take away from the magnificence of the object you have photographed. 

That's normally what I'd do, but honestly - I didn't expect people to like this image all that much. But now that I know people can find the beauty in it I'll take the presentation much more seriously now.

 

But yeah I'm definitely going to try some flats.



#13 Ballyhoo

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 04:55 PM

A few weeks ago I posted a basic generic attempt at Andromeda. After learning more with DSLR Astrophotography I took my first real attempt

at capturing all of the beauty.

 

Andromeda -
300 images stacked.
10 second exposures
Canon 75-300mm Lens (set to 300mm).
F5.6
ISO-1600
Canon T6-Rebel 1300D.
Bortle Class 4.
75% Moon intensity roughly.
(NO TELESCOPE). Just my camera and a 300mm lens.

Deepsky Stacker and Lightroom were used to process and such.

This is my first real attempt at capturing Andromeda. Will hopefully have a much better one Sunday night as it should be clear.

Over all, this is only around 48 minutes of exposures.
came out better than I expected.

 

(NOTE: used my tripod and mount for my Celestron Astromaster 114eq and a cheap 35 dollar Motor)... Didn't use the telescope though, just mounted my camera via a piece of wood and a proper threaded bolt to put my camera on it).

 

(NOTE -2: Due to having to shrink the image and adjusting jpg compression - there is slightly more noise on it).

 

(EDIT): I did 20 darks and 20 bias.

 

attachicon.gif Andromeda_Smaller.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

What would be considered your cameras aperture? You set it to 300mm and surely that represents the focal length.  But I am thinking a big lens has an aperture of approx 75mm?



#14 md11spotter98

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 07:38 PM

What would be considered your cameras aperture? You set it to 300mm and surely that represents the focal length.  But I am thinking a big lens has an aperture of approx 75mm?

300mm at f/5.6 means an "effective aperture" of 53.6mm.




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