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#151 twidget

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 02:54 PM

Russ,

 

Your name for that lunar eclipse, "Cracker-jack Catsup Banana-Slug Baloney Moon", is quite a tasty name !! (Except for the "-slug" part tongue2.gif )  I love it !!

waytogo.gif 


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#152 kksmith

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 03:43 PM

Hey - it' s Super Worm Moon Wensday!

 

Ken


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#153 BFaucett

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 06:19 PM

Hey - it' s Super Worm Moon Wensday!

 

Ken

 

How about the "Super Worm Equinox Moon'?  roflmao.gif

 

https://www.nbcnews....2019-ncna984861

 

I wish the news media would just drop this whole "super moon" thing.


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#154 Asbytec

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 07:07 AM

How about the "Super Worm Equinox Moon'? roflmao.gif

https://www.nbcnews....2019-ncna984861

I wish the news media would just drop this whole "super moon" thing.

It began in our farmer's almanacs. When to expect the Robins to appear on your lawn looking for worms, etc. I'd have to look it up, but it may even date back to Native American culture. Yea, it sounds kind of (is lame the right word?), but it's been with us for a while. Kind of like to hang onto some traditions. Still, some folks get all excited about a blood moon as if it's the end of the world...this time, for sure. Have we ever had a super blue blood worm moon? You know, the second full moon during the month in the spring and totally eclipsed at perigee...all at the same time. If we have, that's what they'd call it. smile.gif

Edited by Asbytec, 23 March 2019 - 09:07 AM.

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#155 twidget

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 09:18 AM

This is what I call ANY full moon...."That ****ed Moon!!" .



#156 twidget

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 09:40 AM

(but only when the sky is otherwise shootable, which is only when the moon is within 4 days of full, around here lately crazy.gif )

 

Mike


Edited by twidget, 23 March 2019 - 09:48 AM.


#157 Asbytec

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 11:47 PM

This is what I call ANY full moon...."That ****ed Moon!!" .

God's street light. 

 

Yea, if you can beat them, observe them. And name them (subtle segue back to topic).  smile.gif


Edited by Asbytec, 23 March 2019 - 11:47 PM.

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#158 twidget

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Posted 24 March 2019 - 09:59 AM

God's street light. 

 

Yea, if you can beat them, observe them. And name them (subtle segue back to topic).  smile.gif

 

That name for the Moon is exactly on-topic lol.gif 

 

Mike


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#159 danmdak

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 09:29 PM

March 2019 Astronomy did it again. Ive been observing since 1974. Thats 45 years (April 22 is the date and my anniversary is coming up!). I have never, ever, EVER, in my entire life EVER heard of the very well known M82 referred to as the cigar galaxy, yet there it is! Boy am I dumb to not know that. Never mind I have regularly been observing M81-82 since 1977, show it to people whenever they are over and it is up, and along with M81 is a dual galaxy showpiece in a small scope. The cigar galaxy. Oh and M81 is now Bodes Galaxy. Sigh.....


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#160 Rustler46

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 10:20 PM

March 2019 Astronomy did it again. Ive been observing since 1974. Thats 45 years (April 22 is the date and my anniversary is coming up!). I have never, ever, EVER, in my entire life EVER heard of the very well known M82 referred to as the cigar galaxy, yet there it is! Boy am I dumb to not know that. Never mind I have regularly been observing M81-82 since 1977, show it to people whenever they are over and it is up, and along with M81 is a dual galaxy showpiece in a small scope. The cigar galaxy. Oh and M81 is now Bodes Galaxy. Sigh.....

At least someone isn't calling it the Blood Galaxy. The Blood Moon business ignores the fact that not all eclipsed Moons are reddish. Some are very dark, grey, sometimes bluish. I suppose in such cases someone will come up with another moniker. But the color of an upcoming lunar eclipse is next to impossible to predict. As far as the Bode's Galaxy tag, that one is well established since J.E. Bode discovered both M81 and M82 at Berlin in December 1774. While Burnham's Celestial Handbook makes note of their discoverer, it doesn't refer to the pair as "Bode's Galaxies". But that name has been used from time to time as far back as I can remember. As for the Cigar Galaxy, who knows when that one emerged. There are so many names that who knows who attached. I would hardly call these common names. 

 

I prefer to stick with traditional names like the Swan and Eagle Nebulae, the Lagoon and Trifid Nebulae. I'm not much for the Wild Duck (M11). But I'm OK with whatever might get people to look away from their computer screens and actually look up at something in the night sky, whatever they call it.


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#161 twidget

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 11:58 PM

March 2019 Astronomy did it again. Ive been observing since 1974. Thats 45 years (April 22 is the date and my anniversary is coming up!). I have never, ever, EVER, in my entire life EVER heard of the very well known M82 referred to as the cigar galaxy, yet there it is! Boy am I dumb to not know that. Never mind I have regularly been observing M81-82 since 1977, show it to people whenever they are over and it is up, and along with M81 is a dual galaxy showpiece in a small scope. The cigar galaxy. Oh and M81 is now Bodes Galaxy. Sigh.....

danmdak,

 

Not to be rubbing salt in the wound, but my folders for those two fuzzies have those monikers in the folder names, and have had since the folders were created in July, 2017. I think I picked them up on the old DSO-Browser site.  Personally, I'm on your side.  And, I don't think M82 looks like a very-well-rolled cigar.

 

Mike


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#162 Starman1

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 12:41 AM

The early name for the Swan Nebula was the Omega Nebula (all they saw was the curved part).
I've seen recent references calling it the Checkmark Nebula (after, I presume, its appearance in a small scope).
In dark skies with a 12.5" aperture, and using a good nebula filter, it appears like a giant cloud with the "swan" part of it at most 20% of the visible nebula, and nebulosity can be seen connecting it with M16 a few degrees away.
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#163 Rustler46

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 08:43 PM

The early name for the Swan Nebula was the Omega Nebula (all they saw was the curved part).
I've seen recent references calling it the Checkmark Nebula (after, I presume, its appearance in a small scope).
In dark skies with a 12.5" aperture, and using a good nebula filter, it appears like a giant cloud with the "swan" part of it at most 20% of the visible nebula, and nebulosity can be seen connecting it with M16 a few degrees away.

I've also heard this one called the "Checkmark Nebula". But I'm partial to the Swan or Omega designations. It is amazing how many of our familiar deep sky wonders are just the brighter parts of a vastly larger array. Here is where astrophotography really shines. But seeing these images can help visual observers appreciate the brighter parts.




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