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4K Video of lunar meteorite impact!

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#1 darthwyll

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:00 PM

I was able to film most of the eclipse and got extremely lucky to capture the meteorite impact! Video below!

 

I noted impact time as 10:41pm central. 


https://youtu.be/42d1jSTSfWI


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#2 f430

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:12 PM

Was mostly clouded over here.

Cool catch!!!!


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#3 darthwyll

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:14 PM

Was mostly clouded over here.

Cool catch!!!!

I hate to hear that. But thank ya! I've always wanted to catch one of these. It's unreal I finally got one!



#4 petert913

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:26 PM

Awesome !


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#5 philipdehazya

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:34 PM

Double awesome!


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#6 Tom Glenn

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:51 PM

Nice job!  I haven't looked into this much yet, but is your recorded time of impact in accord with the other reports out there?  Cool stuff.  


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#7 B 26354

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:53 PM

Wow. That is totally cool. Amazing.


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#8 Earthbound1

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:54 PM

Nice!!!
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#9 EricTheCat

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 05:17 PM

Nice catch!  That is really cool.  Thanks for sharing.


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#10 Codbear

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 05:17 PM

Nice job!  I haven't looked into this much yet, but is your recorded time of impact in accord with the other reports out there?  Cool stuff.  

Just googled it and multiple video sources corroborated a light flash, consistent with a lunar impact, at 11:41 EST, which is completely consistent with the Poster's 10:41 CST.


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#11 zohsix

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 05:38 PM

Silly question, why is there a light flash?  Is there enough of an atmosphere to cause a meteorite to burn up on entry?

 

Regards,

 

Dan 


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#12 darthwyll

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 05:39 PM

Nice job!  I haven't looked into this much yet, but is your recorded time of impact in accord with the other reports out there?  Cool stuff.  

I think so. When I started this particular video I noted the time and then added the seconds of playback. I could be off by a second or so but that should be close? Kinda a happy accident. 


Edited by darthwyll, 22 January 2019 - 05:39 PM.


#13 darthwyll

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 05:43 PM

Silly question, why is there a light flash?  Is there enough of an atmosphere to cause a meteorite to burn up on entry?

 

Regards,

 

Dan 

From what I understand the flash is caused by the sudden release of kinetic energy at the moment of impact. I think of it like when metal hits metal at high rates of speed it can cause sparks. I would think if a car shaped object hit the moon going 80,000 miles per hour it would make a pretty gnarly flash. There is no lunar atmosphere so what we are seeing is the rock being vaporized instantaneously. But I'm no impact expert. Just an amateur astronomer. smile.gif


Edited by darthwyll, 22 January 2019 - 05:44 PM.

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#14 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 05:43 PM

Silly question, why is there a light flash? Is there enough of an atmosphere to cause a meteorite to burn up on entry?

Regards,

Dan

That flash is the meteor hitting the surface of the moon. No atmosphere there.
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#15 TOMDEY

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 06:03 PM

Fantastic! But, the only thing that doesn't compute... How could a meteoroid possibly penetrate the earth's shadow to arrive at the surface of the moon? IMPOSSIBLE, I say! It would have to bounce off the shadow, careening off into intergalactic space. Unless... UNLESS... Maybe this proves that the earth’s shadow has little holes in it. Therefore, the earth is made of Swiss Cheese. I rest my case.  Tom


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#16 Codbear

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 06:32 PM

From what I understand the flash is caused by the sudden release of kinetic energy at the moment of impact. I think of it like when metal hits metal at high rates of speed it can cause sparks. I would think if a car shaped object hit the moon going 80,000 miles per hour it would make a pretty gnarly flash. There is no lunar atmosphere so what we are seeing is the rock being vaporized instantaneously. But I'm no impact expert. Just an amateur astronomer. smile.gif

Pretty much spot-on. At 20 miles per second, with a deceleration to zero in the span of a few feet to meters it is a HUGE amount of kinetic energy turning to thermal energy almost instantaneously, resulting in the white flash. The dinosaurs saw just a bit brighter flash than that 65 million years ago!


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#17 TOMDEY

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 07:54 PM

I guess a cool project would be to build a dedicated/automated lunar tracking telescope/camera that would just run video on Luna whenever conditions permit. And software to sift for "change events", flag them. Then one would just scrutinize those few (?) to see if any look like point-impact flashes. A fairly modest telescope in dome could do that.

 

Actually, I assume some professionals and amateurs may be already doing that?    Tom


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#18 Tyson M

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 10:09 PM

Awesome catch! 


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#19 goodricke1

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 07:24 AM

I guess a cool project would be to build a dedicated/automated lunar tracking telescope/camera that would just run video on Luna whenever conditions permit. And software to sift for "change events", flag them. Then one would just scrutinize those few (?) to see if any look like point-impact flashes. A fairly modest telescope in dome could do that.

 

Actually, I assume some professionals and amateurs may be already doing that?    Tom

 

Yes, indeed they are -

 

https://www.research...Analysis-System


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#20 Ishtim

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 08:09 AM

I guess a cool project would be to build a dedicated/automated lunar tracking telescope/camera that would just run video on Luna whenever conditions permit. And software to sift for "change events", flag them. Then one would just scrutinize those few (?) to see if any look like point-impact flashes. A fairly modest telescope in dome could do that.

 

Actually, I assume some professionals and amateurs may be already doing that?    Tom

They have, since 2006...
https://www.nasa.gov...unar/index.html

 

...and actually more common occurrence than one may think. 
https://www.nasa.gov...ar_impacts.html

 


Edited by Ishtim, 23 January 2019 - 08:12 AM.

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#21 RomanHujer

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 08:36 AM

My raw video  from Sony camera of Impact on the Moon during the Jan.21 2019  lunar eclipse

 

See 6-7 sec in this video :

https://youtu.be/tQOXB2NwjWQ

or 

https://vimeo.com/312835585

 

The locality: Jistebsko near Jablonec nad Nisou, Czech Republic
Camera: Sony ILCE-5100 and Tamron AF70-300mm F/4-5,6 LD

Lunar eclipse gallery : https://www.zonerama...r/Album/5049366

 

Roman 


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#22 TOMDEY

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:08 AM

I guess a cool project would be to build a dedicated/automated lunar tracking telescope/camera that would just run video on Luna whenever conditions permit. And software to sift for "change events", flag them. Then one would just scrutinize those few (?) to see if any look like point-impact flashes. A fairly modest telescope in dome could do that.

Actually, I assume some professionals and amateurs may be already doing that?    Tom

They have, since 2006...
https://www.nasa.gov...unar/index.html

...and actually more common occurrence than one may think. 
https://www.nasa.gov...ar_impacts.html

Thanks! And, yes... We were building "point event" cameras for that kinda stuff at work, several decades ago!

 

Closely related: High-Speed Spectrophotometry and Beat-Frequency Radiometry. I've configured my telescope for the later.    Tom

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#23 aeroman4907

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:40 AM

It was probably too small a meteorite to detect the site of impact, but I tried anyway as I performed a whole moon mosaic just after the whole eclipse ended.  Seeing was actually quite poor, so resolution is not great (probably best crater resolves were in the 3 to 4 km range with the flat lighting).  In any case, I overlaid a video frame of the impact over my mosaic, and then also performed an overlay at the same image scale as my scope with LRO data which is much clearer, but I wanted to see if I could detect any change.  I didn't detect anything, but it would be interesting to see if it were possible with a larger scope under much better lighting and seeing conditions would be able to.  I'll post what I have to see if anyone will find it useful to see if they can detect a new crater.

 

The image below is the whole moon with an overlay of the video image where the flash from the impact is noted somewhere close between Legrange H and Legrange C.

 

General-Impact-Location.jpg

 

Here is the closeup of my image taken shortly after (obviously on the left), and then a section of LRO imagery on the right.  The flash is seen as a white overlay in both images.  I certainly didn't detect anything with my equipment, but hopefully it is possible someone else might be able to.

 

Impact-Comparison.jpg

 

 


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#24 Jayem

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 05:10 PM

Nice catch, darthwyll...and congrats waytogo.gif

 

Like Aeroman4907 above, I too did some overlaying, and arrived at his estimate of somewhere between Lagrange H and C (below is an overhead view).

 

click for larger view

EclipseImpact1

 

EclipseImpact

 

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 23 January 2019 - 05:22 PM.

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#25 Tom Glenn

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 06:11 PM

Cool stuff.  As far as detecting evidence of the impact crater from Earth, you can forget about it!  Most impactors range in size from a grain of sand to a small pebble, and according to NASA, even an impactor of about 5kg (fairly large by these standards) would "only" generate  a crater of about 9m in diameter.  LRO has detected some evidence of new impact craters, but from Earth all we get is the light flash.  Very cool that so many people managed to image the same event.  Not too surprising when you consider the popularity of a lunar eclipse, and the fact that it represents a good time to detect the flashes.  


Edited by Tom Glenn, 23 January 2019 - 06:12 PM.

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