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Imaging burn out

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#26 the Elf

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 10:57 AM

I often asked myself "Why am I doing this?". The best answer I found so far: because it creates a resonance within me. If this is not or no longer the case for you, don't worry! We all develop and change all the time. Store your equippment in a warm and dry place and try other things. If you find yourself not using it for year think about seeling it. Meanwhile try all sorts of things and find out what creates that resonance within you. I was very deep in motorcycling and made about 1/2 million km on bikes on 4 continents. My wife and me owned 7 bikes and 3 cars. North Cape, Alaska, New Zealand, Sahara dessert, .... Now I own one bike that I use for about 300km a year when my car needs service. Things that have been the center of your life my turn into something unimportant and vice versa. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that.


Edited by the Elf, 27 January 2019 - 10:58 AM.

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#27 Eddie_42

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 11:56 AM

When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.
-- Walt Whitman

One of the most brilliant men I knew, my college professor/advisor of physics, had this hanging in his office. Always encouraged us to remember why we were pursuing the field.

If you are getting lost in the process, take a step back and re-kindle the spark that drives you.
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#28 nimitz69

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 01:38 PM

Hi all,
Has anyone ever experienced imaging burn out? For example tonight, a lovely clear night I just couldn't be bothered to take the imaging setup out to image. And this is now that I have a complete setup, but no obs. I think I'm just losing interest, or lack of any equipment to upgrade to is really not exciting me. Either way, the last time I was excited to image was a long time ago.

I feel like I'm too far in now to sell my setup, and I just feel terrible.
Have you guys experienced this before?

Pretty common actually so you have several options:

 

-  try getting involved in a different aspect of AP you don’t do now to see if that excites you 

-  put your AP stuff away and go do other things and see if you develop a ‘Longing’ to do it after a while ... could be several months

-  sell your stuff and move on to a new hobby ... I recommend competitive action shooting.  Incredibly difficult to become any good at and you can easily spend thousands of dollars on it and it’s not a a’team’ activity .....



#29 sg6

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 02:07 PM

Are you taking it too seriously?

You do not say what the intended equipment was and so no indication of the pre imaging setup, nor as it happens the probable duration.

 

If using the mono then you that gets serious. Mono take time and effort. OSC may not produce the same results but I expect that in an hour you could have all you need to produce something.

 

Imaging seems a bit odd to me at times. I can happily go for OSC (no choice really) and take 40 second exposures with a bit of cooling time and do that 30 or 40 or 60 times. I stand there listening to it going whirr and click while looking through binoculars or watching the eyes in the red torch look back at me.

 

I see more posts of people trying to obtain 5 minutes of unguided tracking, and not just doing the imaging. Said somewhere it seems at times more competition of who gets the longest exposure.

 

Your equipment is on the previous page, so unsure, but take mount+scope+3 eyepieces and just have a look. Strange question "Do you ever look at the object you are imaging?" just seems too easy for the 2 to become separated.



#30 jcj380

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 09:01 AM

When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.
-- Walt Whitman
 

 

I've been trying to remember that poem.  Thanks!



#31 Phil Cowell

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 09:26 PM

A quick grab and go setup can be fun. The observatory makes life easier as you can sit in the house in the warm using EAA. We all ge night when there isn’t the drive at -10F and below. Those tend to be the get a log fire burning and kick back in the lazy boy. A good book or something worth watching on the science channel and a glass of single malt call. 

Take a break or plan an observatory for your imaging setup. The observatory can let an imaging run kick off remotely while you kick back. It also help feed the gear demon slowly lol. A Simple push off housing can work well.

Relax lifes to short to stress.



#32 gman1971

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 12:09 AM

I have been on this situation, but for other hobbies, (namely RC helicopters) and while I haven't regularly flown for a few years now, I have kept all my helicopters in a ready to fly status, just buy new batteries and they will spool up back to life. However, selling the stuff, IMO, would only be considered a last ditch effort if I am strapped for cash, b/c when liquidating assets you always lose money (unless you have one-offs that are highly soughed after, like some of my giant scale helis) , and also don't forget the time it took you to get all those components work together. Its more than the actual money, its the time you invested in learning the components.

 

So my craze for flying 2 hours a day is long gone, but to keep the spark alive I fly tiny little drones, cheap Amazon toys, and while they are nowhere near as impressive as flying my large multi-blade scale helicopters, I can fly these anywhere, and if they break beyond repair just buy another one for 19 dollars on Amazon, not a big loss... etc... much like a grab-and-go telescope setup... I think, always having something small that you can pick up at anytime, plop down and look at the stars to keep the spark alive is great to have.

 

I also found out that if you have someone else to do it with, (like my eldest son, my wife, etc) that helps quite a bit keeping the interest from dying. 

 

G.


Edited by gman1971, 29 January 2019 - 12:10 AM.


#33 balu01

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 01:22 AM

Simple , try go out to a dark site every clear night. You’ll be back to where you were in a heartbeat and glad that at least you don’t have to drive an hr or two LOL.
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#34 jtrezzo

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 02:38 PM

I know exactly what you mean. It is such a weird hobby in that we are completely at the mercy of the environment as to when we can do it. It's not like all other hobbies I've had, where you can choose to do it whenever you feel like it - indoors. When that clear night comes it doesn't care if you are in the mood. You have to either take it or not.

 

That said I hardly ever regret it when I "force" myself to go out on those clear nights when I'm not really in the mood (unless they quickly cloud up), but I certainly have regretted it when I don't get out there and miss out. I think if you are getting to the point where you do force yourself to go out and then still regret it after, maybe just take a break.


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#35 bobzeq25

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 03:53 PM

Hi all,
Has anyone ever experienced imaging burn out? For example tonight, a lovely clear night I just couldn't be bothered to take the imaging setup out to image. And this is now that I have a complete setup, but no obs. I think I'm just losing interest, or lack of any equipment to upgrade to is really not exciting me. Either way, the last time I was excited to image was a long time ago.

I feel like I'm too far in now to sell my setup, and I just feel terrible.
Have you guys experienced this before?

No, but I'm weird.  <smile>

 

Imaging is very much not for everyone.  There is always some frustration.  Some wasted nights or nights that simply don't go as well as you think they "should".  Always something you don't know or am not using that you think you "should".  For me, it's autofocus.

 

It's not all pure joy, but if you "feel terrible", sell the d*** equipment.  It's not a defeat.


Edited by bobzeq25, 29 January 2019 - 03:56 PM.


#36 DaveB

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 10:38 PM

Yes, I definitely went through a long burnout phase, especially before I put in an ROR observatory in my backyard. I really had to be in the right frame of mind for the setup and tear-down. I admire the dedicated souls who drive with a portable setup to a remote dark site regularly. I would not be in this hobby if I needed to do that.

 

Plus, I have several hobbies, so my hobby time will ebb and flow between hobbies over the course of a year or more.

 

Since I've put in my observatory (18 months ago), I've imaged on nearly every clear, moonless night. It's so easy. On many nights, I will open the roof, take an hour or so of images, then the clouds will come in and I just close the roof. There is no way that I would have ever set up my gear for a night like that before the obs.

 

I will say that I find image capture to be cathartic, while I find image processing to be somewhat tedious. As a result, so that I don't build up too much of an image backlog, I tend to try to get a minimum of 12 hours of data on any given target. Contrast that with my pre-observatory days, when I was thrilled to get two hours on any target.


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#37 glend

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 10:53 PM

I don't see how the OP of this thread could possibly be burnt out, he is far too young.

 

My observatory is sitting idle. The CGX is still on its pier but I have sold off all my scopes except for two, one imaging and one visual - neither getting used.  Life gets in the way, and in my case, once you have imaged (broad & narrowband) every single emission nebula in the Southern Hemisphere, where do you go from there. I have Terabytes of image files, I could easily spend the next few years re-processing these to produce better results. My Astrobin gallery is full of wonderful images that I invested years of long hours to acquire and produce. Frankly, I am burnt out.  I literally have nothing left that I want to image.  

There is simply no point in revisiting what I have done, and as BB King said "the thrill is gone".


Edited by glend, 30 January 2019 - 01:32 AM.

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#38 Lite2

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 10:55 PM


 

 


 

I admire the dedicated souls who drive with a portable setup to a remote dark site regularly. I would not be in this hobby if I needed to do that.

I have to totally agree with that statement, if I couldn't do it at all at home I wouldn't be doing any.


Edited by Lite2, 29 January 2019 - 10:55 PM.


#39 Lognic04

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 07:21 AM

Imaging again tonight after a bit of a break :)

Thanks for all your help guys!


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#40 Dagobert

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 01:03 PM

I don't see how the OP of this thread could possibly be burnt out, he is far too young.

 

My observatory is sitting idle. The CGX is still on its pier but I have sold off all my scopes except for two, one imaging and one visual - neither getting used.  Life gets in the way, and in my case, once you have imaged (broad & narrowband) every single emission nebula in the Southern Hemisphere, where do you go from there. I have Terabytes of image files, I could easily spend the next few years re-processing these to produce better results. My Astrobin gallery is full of wonderful images that I invested years of long hours to acquire and produce. Frankly, I am burnt out.  I literally have nothing left that I want to image.  

There is simply no point in revisiting what I have done, and as BB King said "the thrill is gone".

That is quite a story.  I am speechless.



#41 Betelgeuze

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 12:08 PM

I have a cloud-burn-out, after a few months full of clouds...  blackeye.gif

So no imaging-burn-out for me..



#42 schmeah

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 06:43 PM

I don't see how the OP of this thread could possibly be burnt out, he is far too young.

 

My observatory is sitting idle. The CGX is still on its pier but I have sold off all my scopes except for two, one imaging and one visual - neither getting used.  Life gets in the way, and in my case, once you have imaged (broad & narrowband) every single emission nebula in the Southern Hemisphere, where do you go from there. I have Terabytes of image files, I could easily spend the next few years re-processing these to produce better results. My Astrobin gallery is full of wonderful images that I invested years of long hours to acquire and produce. Frankly, I am burnt out.  I literally have nothing left that I want to image.  

There is simply no point in revisiting what I have done, and as BB King said "the thrill is gone".

I don’t know your setup / previous scopes, but I can understand how you feel at least with respect to large emission nebulae. In the Northern hemisphere as well, if you image long enough you really can run out of targets. But you -can’t- run out of targets when imaging at long focal lengths. There are just far too many small galaxies, clusters, planetary nebulae, etc. And at a long FL, even emission nebulae become new targets, as you can focus on just a small bit of one in a way that no one ever has before. Also the challenges of imaging at long FL could renew your interest. Take a look at Rick Johnson’s catalog. And he often opined about not having enough time left to touch upon a fraction of the targets that he wanted to get to.

 

Derek


Edited by schmeah, 02 February 2019 - 06:45 PM.


#43 MalVeauX

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 06:54 PM

Hi all,
Has anyone ever experienced imaging burn out? For example tonight, a lovely clear night I just couldn't be bothered to take the imaging setup out to image. And this is now that I have a complete setup, but no obs. I think I'm just losing interest, or lack of any equipment to upgrade to is really not exciting me. Either way, the last time I was excited to image was a long time ago.

I feel like I'm too far in now to sell my setup, and I just feel terrible.
Have you guys experienced this before?

With an observatory, I don't feel this way. Before my observatory there were many days/nights I just didn't want to haul it all out just to find out conditions were bad. Observatory changes it all. Now, it can rain, and a minute after, I can image if I feel like it. Now, I don't think about better equipment (this is a sickness caused by sitting on forums all day). Now, I just look out my windows and watch the weather. And several times a day, I can go out and use my system. It's permanently aligned and ready to go at all times. Takes me literally less than 2 minuets to walk out and open it up and my scope is slewing.

 

Figure out if you enjoy imaging first.

 

Either convert to visual.

 

Or figure out if you love it enough to go into an observatory and do both visual & imaging and just enjoy yourself. Not more setup. No more hauling stuff. It's ready when you are.

 

Very best,


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#44 yawg

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 08:49 PM

100% this happens man.  I would argue it happens to everyone.  here in phoenix, we get so many clear nights, that by mid summer I'm actually kind of hoping for clouds.  If I have clear nights and I don't walk my fat **** 20 ft into my yard to open my observatory and collect data, I feel guilty.  I know I have no reason to, but I do.  So yea, after weeks or months straight of imaging 5-6-7 nights per week and not being able to actually get to my data bc of life, I do get burnt out too.  

 

The way I deal with it is to try to remember that this is hobby, and I DEFINE what I do and when I do it,, and if I just wanna chill and be lazy, that's my prerogative.  I have friends that are in the same boat, one that even just does visual with a dob, and HE gets burn out too (althought tbh he does make AAVSO measurements by eye).  It happens, just shrug it off, the universe will be there when you get back.  

 

Also, sometimes it helps to switch it up a bit, do some science, or some follow up up work, or do some system characterization work (i.e. redo your PEC, your dark/bias library, measure your camera linearity, do photometry, etc).


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#45 the Elf

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 06:28 AM

 

imaging 5-6-7 nights per week

??? Are you retired or allowed to come in at 1pm? During the week there is no imaging for folks getting up at 4:30am unless with an automated setup. Sometimes I set the alarm and get up twice at night to adjust the scope not to waste that one precious night after 2 months of rain. Seems like I live in the wrong place!


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#46 Lognic04

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 07:16 AM

hmm... Seems like for a good month imaging was a fixation for me back then. Now, the desire and interest to image has completely dropped off. I'm very proud of my last pic, and i like it, but i feel for some reason no need or push to get out and image. Doesn't help i've been really getting to love visual (especially at the dark site!) lately.



#47 MikeTahtib

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 08:27 AM

Don't mourn the loss of interest in AP; embrace the love of visual!!  Now you have 2 hobbies, and interest will come and go in each over time.  Just accept it.



#48 Ballyhoo

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 09:21 AM

Hi all,
Has anyone ever experienced imaging burn out? For example tonight, a lovely clear night I just couldn't be bothered to take the imaging setup out to image. And this is now that I have a complete setup, but no obs. I think I'm just losing interest, or lack of any equipment to upgrade to is really not exciting me. Either way, the last time I was excited to image was a long time ago.

I feel like I'm too far in now to sell my setup, and I just feel terrible.
Have you guys experienced this before?

DO you enjoy processing? Maybe you can just focus on that for a while if so, Try and get a repository of images to work for a while.



#49 Rocketrat1

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 04:24 PM

I’ve definitely experienced times where I just want to sit on my couch and watch tv. ANd there have been time where I have done just that, I think for me that if I have a successful imaging session then that definitely relights the flame for me. 



#50 xiando

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 05:15 PM

I haven't imaged since last summer. I'm tired of my little 6" scope's marginal abilities and am somewhat reluctant to drop a small bucket of cash on a larger one with better quality components. Not to mention my schedule hasn't been all that favorable to staying up all night to coddle my setup. I also need to redo my wind/light shield setup (probably the biggest drag on my enthusiasm right now honestly...it's not an "option" for imaging in my yard, it's a necessity). The cheapo setup using plasticoated tomato stakes was great, but a wind storm pretty well wiped out most of it. 


Edited by xiando, 23 April 2019 - 05:16 PM.



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