Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Gso vs high point vs astro tech vs orion vs etc....

  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:13 PM

I am looking to get an 8" newtonian soon and have run across quite a few f4 Newtonians.  Are they all the same?

How does this gso compare.  It comes with a coma corrector which makes it a great value. 

https://romer-optics...for-photography

Is there much of a difference in various brands.  

I may prefer to get an f5 but they are harder to find.  I was given a link to a Canadian version f5 that looks promising.  Any thoughts on the differences of all the various brands.  

https://www.kwtelesc...dual-speed.html

 

Thanks


Edited by Ericreschly, 23 January 2019 - 10:15 PM.


#2 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:21 PM

Here are some other links to various brands

https://www.highpoin...tonian-ota-8f4n

https://explorescien...20839-newtonian

https://www.astronom...tical-tube.html

https://www.highpoin...strograph-08297



#3 SynisterAZ

SynisterAZ

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 19
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Northern Arizona

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:33 PM

These are all for astrophotography, is that what you are trying to do? What type of objects do you intend to photograph? These will still all require a equatorial mount and for photography, a motorized mount with tracking. If you want these for visual, Ive learned that a newtonian on a equatorial mount can make for a frustrating and cumbersome experience. 


  • Jon Isaacs, havasman and gman1971 like this

#4 17.5Dob

17.5Dob

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • ****-
  • Posts: 5174
  • Joined: 21 Mar 2013
  • Loc: Colorado,USA

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:33 PM

Visual or AP ?

If you're looking for a visual scope, than any of those will work.

If you want to try AP, then none of them are suitable. If you want an 8" for AP, you need THIS

 

or THIS



#5 havasman

havasman

    Cosmos

  • ****-
  • Posts: 9743
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:35 PM

Entry level small aperture fast Newts are usually sold as "astrographs" and most visual observers may be better served by the more standard f6 scopes found in the 8" aperture range.

 

Orion XT8 Classic - https://www.telescop...yCategoryId=398

 

Orion XT8i - https://www.telescop...ByCategoryId=27

 

Orion XT8 - https://www.telescop...yCategoryId=398


  • Jon Isaacs and 25585 like this

#6 petert913

petert913

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3242
  • Joined: 27 May 2013
  • Loc: Portland, OR

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:38 PM

Try to get one with a dual-speed focuser.  Just a nice option you will appreciate.



#7 SeattleScott

SeattleScott

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5693
  • Joined: 14 Oct 2011

Posted 23 January 2019 - 11:25 PM

I mean they are all mass produced in China so the quality is basically the same. I don’t know that you are more likely to get lucky with one brand over the other. Half of them are probably made in the same factory. The other half were made in a different factory. Really it just comes down to getting the right features at the right price. With SCT it seems people prefer Celestron but it isn’t clear that there is a consensus favorite in Newts.

Scott

#8 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 78521
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:16 AM

Visual or AP ?

If you're looking for a visual scope, than any of those will work.

If you want to try AP, then none of them are suitable. If you want an 8" for AP, you need THIS

 

or THIS

Dave:

 

I am curious why you believe the others are not suitable for astro-photograhy ?

 

Jon


  • martinw89 likes this

#9 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 15507
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 24 January 2019 - 06:48 AM

In the "etc." department, try this one on for size. Great scope. 8" f/6. I am enjoying mine. No frills, really, but it's built well with fine optics. Add a finder and a fan...let the large bearings alleviate weight and balance problems. Tube rings are a bonus. Strong focuser (double speed available) and a spider that holds collimation well at all altitudes. The 9 point mirror cell is strong and the interior paint is pretty dark. 

 

https://explorescien...ght-8-dobsonian


Edited by Asbytec, 24 January 2019 - 06:51 AM.


#10 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 08:55 AM

These are all for astrophotography, is that what you are trying to do? What type of objects do you intend to photograph? These will still all require a equatorial mount and for photography, a motorized mount with tracking. If you want these for visual, Ive learned that a newtonian on a equatorial mount can make for a frustrating and cumbersome experience. 

I want to start out with visual but I know I will soon move into eaa viewing and dabbling in astrophotography.  I know it is not ideal for either but it should give me an opportunity to play around with visual and photography.  I am most interested in deep space objects, but also want to just casually cruise around the sky.  



#11 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 08:58 AM

Visual or AP ?

If you're looking for a visual scope, than any of those will work.

If you want to try AP, then none of them are suitable. If you want an 8" for AP, you need THIS

 

or THIS

What makes your links suitable for astro that the others don't?  Quality? Features?  



#12 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 09:00 AM

Entry level small aperture fast Newts are usually sold as "astrographs" and most visual observers may be better served by the more standard f6 scopes found in the 8" aperture range.

 

Orion XT8 Classic - https://www.telescop...yCategoryId=398

 

Orion XT8i - https://www.telescop...ByCategoryId=27

 

Orion XT8 - https://www.telescop...yCategoryId=398

Yes, thank you a have and am still considering this as an option.  But I know within a year I will be wanting to hook up a camera and will have limited success with a Dobsonian as opposed to a gem mount.



#13 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 09:02 AM

Try to get one with a dual-speed focuser.  Just a nice option you will appreciate.

I have heard that to be the case.  I think all the links I provided have dual speed.  Which surprised me at those price points. 



#14 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 09:03 AM

I mean they are all mass produced in China so the quality is basically the same. I don’t know that you are more likely to get lucky with one brand over the other. Half of them are probably made in the same factory. The other half were made in a different factory. Really it just comes down to getting the right features at the right price. With SCT it seems people prefer Celestron but it isn’t clear that there is a consensus favorite in Newts.

Scott

This is what I was curious about.  I had A feeling there wasn't much difference.



#15 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 09:06 AM

In the "etc." department, try this one on for size. Great scope. 8" f/6. I am enjoying mine. No frills, really, but it's built well with fine optics. Add a finder and a fan...let the large bearings alleviate weight and balance problems. Tube rings are a bonus. Strong focuser (double speed available) and a spider that holds collimation well at all altitudes. The 9 point mirror cell is strong and the interior paint is pretty dark. 

 

https://explorescien...ght-8-dobsonian

I like the explorescientific stuff and saw that scope.  The 2.5" focuser caught my attention.  Is it just a marketing gimic or is it a lot better focuser.  I was also afraid maybe the first light series was a budget line.  But if they all come from China anyways.....



#16 martinw89

martinw89

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 33
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2018
  • Loc: Florida

Posted 24 January 2019 - 09:11 AM

Dave:

 

I am curious why you believe the others are not suitable for astro-photograhy ?

 

Jon

 

I'm curious about the same. Plenty of people use the 8" f/4 GSO for astrophotography. It might not be a strehl 0.95 system with a top tier focuser, but that should be obvious with the price.

 

https://www.astrobin...At8in&d=i&t=all



#17 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 15507
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 24 January 2019 - 10:36 AM

I like the explorescientific stuff and saw that scope. The 2.5" focuser caught my attention. Is it just a marketing gimic or is it a lot better focuser. I was also afraid maybe the first light series was a budget line. But if they all come from China anyways.....

Great question. It seems like a budget scope, especially called "First Light." Actually I think its more no frills scope rather than a beginner budget scope. It does not come with any eyepeices, no fan, not the best finder, and 10:1 slow motion is an option. No frills, just a nice priced basic Dob.

No push to or go to, no electronics, nothing but bare bones. But those bare bones are sturdy. Including the 2.5" focuser. It's more of an actual Dob with the nice bearings. After fighting with balance on my most recent Dob, that's a welcome change. I think all Dobs should be built this way. With some getting used to it and soap the movement is descent. No more thump in the night as the tube slews to the zenith when you remove an eyepeice.

There is more to say about it, but it's a scope I believe an experienced observer might enjoy. A few minor mods, like all Dobs, such as washers on the diagonal stem. Some minor counter weight. Thats about it. Add a fan and a finder, and its ready.

The spider is a bit oversized at 33% (perfect for star testing) but it has a ton of back focus. Probably well suited for binos and imaging on a suitable GEM and I believe the focusrr can carry the load. The optics in two samples I know of are very nicely corrected. I see no astigmatism at all, not from the diagonal either.

The Ikea style rocker box is okay, its not bad. Please don't misconstrue, but I may have a local carpenter use the peices as a template to fabricate a solid wood one later. But that's just because I want to. I don't fancy particle board. Still, it works well as is.

I like it as much as others like theirs. The more I use it, the more I like it. Its grown on me from being cautiously optimistic as a beginner's scope to being a good scope I'm comfortable with and enjoy using.

Edited by Asbytec, 24 January 2019 - 10:39 AM.


#18 havasman

havasman

    Cosmos

  • ****-
  • Posts: 9743
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 24 January 2019 - 02:27 PM

Yes, thank you a have and am still considering this as an option.  But I know within a year I will be wanting to hook up a camera and will have limited success with a Dobsonian as opposed to a gem mount.

Then  -  http://www.astropix.com/bgda/bgda.html



#19 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 02:40 PM

Thank you.  Some good reading no doubt


  • havasman likes this

#20 gman1971

gman1971

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 121
  • Joined: 26 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 04:15 PM

I would get a good mount before a good telescope.

 

G.


Edited by gman1971, 24 January 2019 - 05:10 PM.


#21 Ericreschly

Ericreschly

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2018

Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:13 PM

I would get a good mount before a good telescope.

 

G.

Yes, planning on getting a cgem.  I don't want to short myself there.



#22 25585

25585

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5075
  • Joined: 29 Aug 2017
  • Loc: In a valley, in the UK.

Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:31 PM

In the "etc." department, try this one on for size. Great scope. 8" f/6. I am enjoying mine. No frills, really, but it's built well with fine optics. Add a finder and a fan...let the large bearings alleviate weight and balance problems. Tube rings are a bonus. Strong focuser (double speed available) and a spider that holds collimation well at all altitudes. The 9 point mirror cell is strong and the interior paint is pretty dark. 

 

https://explorescien...ght-8-dobsonian

+1  I have the 10 inch version, and its a good quality dob. All the points made above have validity. waytogo.gif


  • Asbytec likes this

#23 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 15507
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 24 January 2019 - 07:03 PM

Thank you.  Some good reading no doubt

Another interesting thread. 

https://www.cloudyni...n-it´s-working/



#24 SynisterAZ

SynisterAZ

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 19
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Northern Arizona

Posted 25 January 2019 - 08:17 AM

I want to start out with visual but I know I will soon move into eaa viewing and dabbling in astrophotography.  I know it is not ideal for either but it should give me an opportunity to play around with visual and photography.  I am most interested in deep space objects, but also want to just casually cruise around the sky.  

Well consider this then, as I have, in trying to wrap my head around what makes for a good starter scope, especially with your aspirations for AP down the road.

 

If you want to start visual and casually cruise around the sky then a 8-10" Dob is where its at. Hang on, bear with me, I know (cuz I was in the same boat) that you want a jack-of-all-trades scope that can drill deep and still provide the flexibility for AP. But, if you get a Dob now in the $300-500 range and maybe a decent zoom eyepiece, you can casually cruise the sky and see whats up there without breaking the bank. And this money is not a waste because when you DO get in to AP, you will probably want a casual, cruiser scope to use while your AP rig is snapping away for hours on end. So the Dob does double duty here, both now and down the road.

 

For AP, you will probably notice that most of the decent setups are more tailored towards refractors of the APO variety in the 80-120mm flavor. For deep sky, you could even probably go Achromatic and go bigger. A mid level 80 or 90mm APO refractor is in the same price range as your target 8" reflectors, will be much easier to move around, require a slightly less heavy duty mount, and even though the aperture is smaller, the camera sensors and AP process can in many ways make up for the bigger glass our eyes need for a good time. Check out some 80-100mm imagery and see what a processed image from a smallish refractor can do.

 

Since your timeline is about a year from visual to AP, you can Dob away in the mean time and keep your eyes on the classifieds for a sweet Skywatcher 80 or 100mm ED Pro or Explore Sci. line of APOs in the same size range. And the CGEM also doesnt need to be as beefy to move around a lighter, more compact refractor so you can likely target less expensive mounts here as well. 


Edited by SynisterAZ, 25 January 2019 - 08:18 AM.

  • 25585 and martinw89 like this

#25 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 15507
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 25 January 2019 - 08:44 AM

If you want to start visual and casually cruise around the sky then a 8-10" Dob is where its at. 

Good advice, I'm sure. I trust you advice on imaging to be well worth considering. Just one thought, though, on the above comment. I am sure you know this, already, and may have intended otherwise. An 8" Dob is much more capable than "casually cruising" around the sky admiring M42 for 5 minutes. It's a good "starter" scope and quite a capable aperture in experienced hands, as well. Kind of the beginning of the larger, more serious apertures where you begin to actually see things. We can cut our teeth on building observing skill and technique which gives an 8" even more reach. It's not a 16" Dob, for sure, nor an 80mm to 120mm APO, but it is a quite capable visual instrument under favorable conditions with or to gain experience. 


  • 25585 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics