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Recommend Atlas for an 8" Celestron Edge HD Evolution

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#1 OzBassman

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 04:09 AM

Twelve months or more prior to purchasing this telescope ( I swore I would never purchase another CAT and that was 30 years ago) I purchased a couple of Cambridge Star Atlases one on Stars and the other on Double Stars by Will Tirion.  I still have the 2000.0 Star Atlas some where in a box when we moved.  Though it has not turned up as yet.

 

I live in Australia, thus Southern Hemisphere and am wondering what Forum Members might recommend in the way of an atlas that would show what an 8" Schmidt Cassegrain is able to resolve and in its ability.  I was thinking of purchasing the "interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas: Field Edition" though they have sold out at my local online book shop though I did find two on another online store.  Would members recommend this field guide and its complimentary desk edition?  Or some other Atlas of renown for an 8" CAT.  The Evolution comes with a plethora of objects in its data base.  Though it would be nice to plan a nights observation and not hop scotch to place I have no idea of.  I have yet to use the telescope or do its first alignment.  Even with all my dreams and aspirations.  We live two streets from the local surf beach and there is too much salt spray in the air.  At least during summer.

 

My wife and I do own a small 17' caravan and the plan was to go camping and observe whilst we were out in remote country towns or deserts.

 

Interests:  Lunar and planets, double stars, planetary nebulas and Messier objects, small open clusters, i.e. The Jewel Box.  Maybe tick off a few Globular Clusters as well.

 

All recommendations welcomed.

 

Warm regards,

 

Paul.



#2 Tony Flanders

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:57 AM

I think the Interstellarum Deep-Sky Atlas would serve your purposes well, if you don't mind its size, weight, and complexity. The Pocket Sky Atlas is also very useful because of its small size and simplicity, as long as you're only interested in showpiece objects. Which is to say, the 500 or so brightest deep-sky objects in the sky.

 

If you want a single thing to cover all conceivable purposes, only an electronic aid will cover that. Sky Safari on a tablet or smartphone is generally agreed to be the best product available.

 

I use several paper atlases frequently, and Sky Safari as well. I still prefer paper for many purposes, but paper cannot compete with electronic aids in versatility and depth.

 

The three paper aids that I use most often are Orion's Deep Map 600, the Pocket Sky Atlas, and the Interstellarum Deep-Sky Atlas.



#3 mrowlands

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 08:42 AM

It sounds like you're looking to start with the bigger and brighter objects (like most of the Messier objects for us in the North).  You could pick a magnitude (say 8 or 9) to limit the targets that you search for.  Electronic guides (like Sky Safari) allow you to set limits like this when selecting targets.

 

Mike R.



#4 OzBassman

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:21 PM

Dear Tony and Mike,

 

Thank you for replying to my post.

 

I appreciate you both responding.  It is quite true that I do wish to see all the pretty objects first before getting into splitting stars and making the most of planets when they are up.  Payday is next Tuesday.  I will make my purchase then of the Interstellarum Deep-Sky Atlas and look into other recommendations when I have the funds.  With regard to the Pocket Sky Atlas my astronomy shop sells two versions.  A small one and a large one.  As it is 1,000 kilometres away and not just around the next corner.  May I ask which one you would recommend or do I purchase both.  One can never have too many books : )

 

I will also purchase the desk version of the Interstellarum Deep-Sky Atlas later as there appears to be a lot of sources for these.  Apart from logging and splitting stars I would also like to hunt down planetary nebulas and globular clusters and pretty things.  Variable stars maybe come a passion later on.  I thank you both for your time and look forward to my new book in a couple of weeks due to postage.  At the moment all I have is a iPhone 5SE.  Though I maybe able to borrow the wife iPad to use Sky Safari.  Thank you for these valuable tips.

 

Warm regards,

 

Paul from Oz.



#5 Starman1

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 05:26 PM

Twelve months or more prior to purchasing this telescope ( I swore I would never purchase another CAT and that was 30 years ago) I purchased a couple of Cambridge Star Atlases one on Stars and the other on Double Stars by Will Tirion.  I still have the 2000.0 Star Atlas some where in a box when we moved.  Though it has not turned up as yet.

 

I live in Australia, thus Southern Hemisphere and am wondering what Forum Members might recommend in the way of an atlas that would show what an 8" Schmidt Cassegrain is able to resolve and in its ability.  I was thinking of purchasing the "interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas: Field Edition" though they have sold out at my local online book shop though I did find two on another online store.  Would members recommend this field guide and its complimentary desk edition?  Or some other Atlas of renown for an 8" CAT.  The Evolution comes with a plethora of objects in its data base.  Though it would be nice to plan a nights observation and not hop scotch to place I have no idea of.  I have yet to use the telescope or do its first alignment.  Even with all my dreams and aspirations.  We live two streets from the local surf beach and there is too much salt spray in the air.  At least during summer.

 

My wife and I do own a small 17' caravan and the plan was to go camping and observe whilst we were out in remote country towns or deserts.

 

Interests:  Lunar and planets, double stars, planetary nebulas and Messier objects, small open clusters, i.e. The Jewel Box.  Maybe tick off a few Globular Clusters as well.

 

All recommendations welcomed.

 

Warm regards,

 

Paul.

For an 8" that gets to dark skies?

At least the Tirion Atlas 2000, though you will go way beyond that.

I presume you are already familiar with John Bambury's list of 600 showpieces for southern observers?

http://www.iceinspac...38-0-0-1-0.html



#6 turtle86

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 10:15 PM

Twelve months or more prior to purchasing this telescope ( I swore I would never purchase another CAT and that was 30 years ago) I purchased a couple of Cambridge Star Atlases one on Stars and the other on Double Stars by Will Tirion.  I still have the 2000.0 Star Atlas some where in a box when we moved.  Though it has not turned up as yet.

 

I live in Australia, thus Southern Hemisphere and am wondering what Forum Members might recommend in the way of an atlas that would show what an 8" Schmidt Cassegrain is able to resolve and in its ability.  I was thinking of purchasing the "interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas: Field Edition" though they have sold out at my local online book shop though I did find two on another online store.  Would members recommend this field guide and its complimentary desk edition?  Or some other Atlas of renown for an 8" CAT.  The Evolution comes with a plethora of objects in its data base.  Though it would be nice to plan a nights observation and not hop scotch to place I have no idea of.  I have yet to use the telescope or do its first alignment.  Even with all my dreams and aspirations.  We live two streets from the local surf beach and there is too much salt spray in the air.  At least during summer.

 

My wife and I do own a small 17' caravan and the plan was to go camping and observe whilst we were out in remote country towns or deserts.

 

Interests:  Lunar and planets, double stars, planetary nebulas and Messier objects, small open clusters, i.e. The Jewel Box.  Maybe tick off a few Globular Clusters as well.

 

All recommendations welcomed.

 

Warm regards,

 

Paul.

 

As much as I enjoy paper atlases, these days I find myself mostly using Sky Safari in the field, whether on my iPhone or iPad.

 

My favorite paper atlas is the Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas.  It goes significantly deeper than the Sky Atlas 2000.00 yet has a smaller footprint.  The Pocket Sky Atlas is an excellent complement to it, as it shows larger swaths of sky and is more wieldy.  (The jumbo version is easier to read but the smaller version is more portable.)   



#7 ascii

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 08:08 AM

The main maps in the jumbo version of the Pocket Sky Atlas are the same as the regular editition with the exception of just being larger.  There is no additional detail.

 

The only significant difference is in the supplemental maps at the end. The regular edition has four maps labeled A through D containing close up views of the Pleiades, Orion's Sword, the Virgo Galaxy Cluster, and the Large Magellanic Cloud.  The jumbo edition adds six more maps showing the Cone and Rosette nebulae, the Big Dipper Bowl, the Lion's Tail (Leo), the Sky Near Deneb, Steam From Teapot (Sagittarius), and Scorpion's Tail (Scorpius).



#8 OzBassman

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 01:58 AM

Dear Starman1,

 

Thank you for bringing to my attention The Bambury's 600.  This looks like an excellent place to start.  I will down load the list and print it out for portable reference.  I do not know how many pages it will be.  Though I do expect quite a few.  To all the others .  I will purchase the books you have mentioned over time.  I am very much appreciative of the time and effort you have gone into in guiding my wife and I on our Return To Astronomy Quest.

 

Warm regards,

 

Paul.




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