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How much does it effect astronomy?

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32 replies to this topic

#1 Clay1846

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 05:47 PM

Hi there, I live in Spartanburg Sc. I was wondering how badly light pollution will effect my experience with astronomy. Considering I live in a yellowish zone how bad willnit be for me?

#2 bobito

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 05:57 PM

Depends on the object.  Planets and the Moon will be fine, star clusters will be OK, but certainly will cause issues on faint objects like Galaxies and Nebula.  But even with that you'll make out some of the more bright objects like Orion Nebula, M81/82 galaxies, and some of the brighter planetary nebula.  You will still get enjoyment out of many objects, just never go to a dark sky location or it will ruin everything from home!  wink.gif

 

I have a friend that lives in a yellow zone, we have plenty to look at from his backyard...

 

Bob


Edited by bobito, 04 February 2019 - 05:57 PM.

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#3 Tony Flanders

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 05:58 PM

Hi there, I live in Spartanburg Sc. I was wondering how badly light pollution will effect my experience with astronomy. Considering I live in a yellowish zone how bad willnit be for me?

Not as good as a green zone, not as bad as an orange zone. For what it's worth, that's probably better skies than at least 90% of all Cloudy Nights members have.

 

Can you see the Milky Way? If so, what does it look like? Your naked-eye view of the Milky Way will give you some sense of what all other galaxies will look like through a telescope.



#4 havasman

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 06:10 PM

You will be able to see many fine objects. But they will be compromised. Some objects will be so severely compromised that they will hardly show.

The only way to really answer your Q is to observe what you can and then go to a dark spot and do it again. You will likely be shocked at the improvement a dark site affords.



#5 Clay1846

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 06:24 PM

Thanks everyone! I feel like the map I looked at is invorrect though. I have family that live way out in the country and they are still in a yellow zone?
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#6 tjw1012

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 06:43 PM

Thanks everyone! I feel like the map I looked at is invorrect though. I have family that live way out in the country and they are still in a yellow zone?

It all depends on the location of the yellow zone. If it is closer to darker, more rural skies, it will still be darker. I have learned this. I have been to many sites before that are in the yellow zone and many differ in darkness for sure. It all depends on how close you are to a city or town. So the yellow zone can be dark or pretty bright light pollution wise if that makes sense. 



#7 TOMDEY

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 06:43 PM

We all live with what we got...

 

But that said, just take once in your life to go to a truly ultra-dark site. There, you will find the answer to your question.

 

Note: This is very similar to seeing a total solar eclipse. The only people who don't think it's worth the trip... have never seen one.    Tom


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#8 tjw1012

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 06:47 PM

Anyway I live in the red zone and am about a 7 on the bortle scale and I can see many open star clusters, globular star clusters, and the brightest nebula. I can also make out the bright galaxies like M31, M32, M110, M81, M82, and others with a six inch scope. Just don't plan on seeing something like M44 at where you are located at with a modest aperture.



#9 Clay1846

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:15 PM

I will be getting the orion xt10i dob. So how will that effect what I will be able to see?

#10 Astroman007

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:36 PM

"How much does it (LP) affect astronomy?"

 

Lots.


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#11 ShaulaB

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:37 PM

M44 is not difficult, it is a big, bright open cluster high up in Cancer. It is known as the Beehive Cluster. You can see it in binocs if you know where to look. In as scope, you will need a wide-field eyepiece, but it will not be difficult to observe. Are you good at star hopping, or do you have a Go To mount?



#12 Astroman007

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:37 PM

We all live with what we got...

 

But that said, just take once in your life to go to a truly ultra-dark site. There, you will find the answer to your question.

 

Note: This is very similar to seeing a total solar eclipse. The only people who don't think it's worth the trip... have never seen one.    Tom

Agreed.



#13 ShaulaB

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:40 PM

"How much does it (LP) affect astronomy?"

 

Lots.

Get used to typos and grammatical errors. These are par for the posting course here. A high school English teacher would have his/her blood pressure elevated after an hour reading posts on CN.

 

The CN members are sincere and genuinely interested in forwarding knowledge of astronomy. Love them for who they are. wink.gif


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#14 Clay1846

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:46 PM

I know everyone is here to help and I really appreciate the advise. And I haven't got my scope yet, ive been researching for the past 4 or 5 days or so. Just trying to soak in all the info so I can tell confident when I get my scope.

#15 Clay1846

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 07:47 PM

The scope I will b getting will be a push to but with electronics to help find things after I star align it.

#16 earlyriser

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 07:30 AM

Yellow is pretty good compared to what I deal with from home, which is where I observe from 95% of the time. I have to drive 45 minutes to get to a yellow zone, and it's well worth the drive. 



#17 Clay1846

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 10:28 AM

Yeah i looked up the bortle scale for my area and its a 5. I would have to drive and hour and a half plus to get less than a 5.

#18 Astroman007

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 02:26 PM

The scope I will b getting will be a push to but with electronics to help find things after I star align it.

So, is that a traditional motorized drive? Or a fully computerized GoTo?



#19 Clay1846

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 05:45 PM

It is a normal push-to dob mount. The only thing on it that has electronics is the intelligence hand controller, which lets you align it and your scope with 2 stars to know where they are in the world. From there you can select different things to locate or take a "tour" and the hand controller will tell you how far up/down and left/right to move your telescope.
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#20 Astroman007

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 10:37 PM

It is a normal push-to dob mount. The only thing on it that has electronics is the intelligence hand controller, which lets you align it and your scope with 2 stars to know where they are in the world. From there you can select different things to locate or take a "tour" and the hand controller will tell you how far up/down and left/right to move your telescope.

Interesting.



#21 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 10:47 PM

The intelliscope feature will definitely help with more difficult objects as far as finding them is concerned. Don't think I would have seen ngc 891 without the controller guiding me to it. It was a quite a tough one for me.

#22 Clay1846

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 10:48 PM

Yeah so learning the sky will be alot easier than just have a normal dob or other telescope

#23 Voyageur

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 08:48 AM

It is a normal push-to dob mount. The only thing on it that has electronics is the intelligence hand controller, which lets you align it and your scope with 2 stars to know where they are in the world. From there you can select different things to locate or take a "tour" and the hand controller will tell you how far up/down and left/right to move your telescope.

It's going to be a great scope! Just to clarify your terminology a bit, "normal" dob mounts are not called push-to. The standard Dobsonian mount is a manual alt-az mount. The term "push-to" refers to the type of electronics your scope has, for which you provide the power to push it to the indicated object, as opposed to goto, where the scope is motor driven. Not trying to be critical, just making sure that when you talk about things here, everyone is on the same page. Have a ton of fun with your scope!



#24 Clay1846

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 10:15 AM

I get it thanks for the info! Ive only been researching for about 5 days now so I'm still learning lol.
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#25 aatt

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 11:04 AM

The answer to your question about light pollution is that is the absolute bane of this hobby and it is getting increasingly hard to avoid significant amounts of it on the east coast. This problem fits our MO as a species as we had to cut down the eastern forests all over the east coast so no virgin stands of timber of any real significance are left. We have now done almost the same scale of destruction to the night sky on the entire eastern seaboard. So a yellow zone is really a treat for most of us in the East. I travel to one in Eastern CT occasionally and the increased contrast really helps with galactic halos and nebula. Not ideal IMO, but certainly way better than my red zone backyard. Green is about the best i can hope for within a two hour drive.Blue to grey zones are 3.5 (Catskills/Adirondacks), 6 (Cherry Springs) and 8 and 11 hours away-Maine/NH and Spruce Knob WV.Really sad scenario that is not going to improve and in fact will probably become exponentially worse given our proclivities, primal fear of the dark, greedy utilities and ignorance. So enjoy it while you can, it probably won't last.




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