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How much does it effect astronomy?

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32 replies to this topic

#26 Clay1846

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 11:17 AM

Yeah that ia what really sucks... Butni think I am only about an hour or 2 from spruce knob so maybe I could make a visit to there once I learn my telescope and the night sky

#27 aatt

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 12:25 PM

You should go there as soon as the snow cover or camping season allows.It is fantastic there. The Milky Way takes on a 3-d quality and DSO viewing can be outstanding. There are some campgrounds in the area and of course the Mountain Institute for viewing places.There are, of course, a couple of neglible light domes that impact viewing very little to the north and east.Not absolutely pristine skies, but about as good as it gets on the eastern seaboard and WELL worth the trip.



#28 Clay1846

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 01:19 PM

Yeah ill probably plan a trip once I get my scope and learn it and the night sky

#29 csrlice12

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 09:27 PM

At a true dark site be prepared that some constellations will disappear into a background of stars....just the plain number of stars you will see naked eye and the Milky Way looking like a cloudbank will leave you gobsmacked......


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#30 Clay1846

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 09:35 PM

That sounds amazing and scary at the same time lol. So ima need to be on par with my stars and stuff before I go to a place like that.

#31 Joshuasnoesky

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 06:53 AM

Get used to typos and grammatical errors. These are par for the posting course here. A high school English teacher would have his/her blood pressure elevated after an hour reading posts on CN.

 

The CN members are sincere and genuinely interested in forwarding knowledge of astronomy. Love them for who they are. wink.gif

Not everyone here is a well educated native english speaker. Lots of people from all around the world, like myself, doing the best they can.


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#32 djr5899

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 09:54 PM

Hi Clay.  I'm a complete newbie here (this is my first post), as well as new to photography and astrophotography in general.  Really just getting started in January 2019.  Using DarkSiteFinder.com, I live in a gray zone in South Florida...only white is worse for light pollution.  I uploaded 4 photos today that show some differences in shooting in different zones, or even different spots in the same light zone.

 

https://www.cloudyni...eginner-photos/

 

  • First photo of Orion is in gray zone.  I'm paying no regard to lighting (there are street lights on either side of me).  Also not paying much attention to optimal camera settings like ISO, ffocal length, or shutter speed.
  • Second photo is also Orion, still in gray zone.  It was taken a week later, only 20-30 feet away from the first photo.  I've made more effort to find a location on the other side of my house, that blocks out more of the direct street light pollution.  I've also played a bit more with camera setttings to be a bit more optimal.
  • Third photo is same location and night as Orion photo 2, however, I am facing the opposite direction (to the West).
  • Last photo, this week I made a 20 minute drive from my house to an orange zone according to DarkSiteFinder, 4 zones darker than the gray zone.  You can see much, much more stars and details around Orion, to the point that Orion is a bit difficult to see with all the other stars around.  I was literally amazed when I stepped out of my car and looked up into the sky. Such a big difference only 20 minutes up the road (out in the Everglades).

The main point in the first 3 photos is, they were all taken in a gray zone, but, the 3rd photo is much better because I have used better settings and made better attempts to get glare or extra light blocked out of my view.  I am using a pretty simple setup, just a Canon M50 Mirroless with the 15-45mm kit lens that comes with the camera.  I am hoping it is clear enough this weekend or sometime soon that I can go about 40 minutes west of me, which is right on the border of green and blue zones on DarkSiteFinder.  That would be another 4 zones darker than where my last photo was taken, and probably the best area I am going to have close to my location.

 

I'd also say processing the raw photos afterwards is a big part of what you will be able to see.  I've learned a lot in a few weeks, but becoming an expert in tweaking the photo settings will definitely help get much better looking photos as well.


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#33 Akol47

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Posted 03 March 2019 - 12:27 PM

Clay, have you had a chance to use your scope yet?




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