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Tall tripods for overhead viewing?

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#26 tmichaelbanks

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 02:58 PM

Agree with several others here that the Oberwerk 5000 tripod and head will give you some flexibility (provided your neck has some flexibility as well!).  I've had mine for about a year.  It works well and is moderately priced.  How comfortable a tall tripod is to use varies with the elevation and the individual.

 

Two nights ago I was using it with my 10x42s and 15x70s for comet searching in Leo, which was nearly overhead.  It definitely was not very comfortable and views were short, but earlier in the evening I was panning around Orion and Canis Major at moderate angles with no problem or discomfort.  Angled binos are very nice, but it's also nice to be able to look directly at your target.

 

A zero-gravity chair is the ticket for casual, high-elevation-angle viewing, for lower powers at least.


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#27 Bob4BVM

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:01 PM

 

This fairly inexpensive Dolica pistol grip mount works ok but needs a better tripod than the one pictured.  Near zenith is ok.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 Near zenith is ok ??? 

From a chair ?

Not ok for me, my neck would be screaming in one minute ?

TEHO of course

 

CS

Bob


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#28 Miranda2525

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:19 PM

 Near zenith is ok ??? 

From a chair ?

Not ok for me, my neck would be screaming in one minute ?

TEHO of course

 

CS

Bob

Chiropractor's nightmare. :lol: 

 

Good luck with that LOL



#29 RickyD85

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Posted Today, 08:07 AM

Agree with several others here that the Oberwerk 5000 tripod and head will give you some flexibility (provided your neck has some flexibility as well!).  I've had mine for about a year.  It works well and is moderately priced.  How comfortable a tall tripod is to use varies with the elevation and the individual.

 

Two nights ago I was using it with my 10x42s and 15x70s for comet searching in Leo, which was nearly overhead.  It definitely was not very comfortable and views were short, but earlier in the evening I was panning around Orion and Canis Major at moderate angles with no problem or discomfort.  Angled binos are very nice, but it's also nice to be able to look directly at your target.

 

A zero-gravity chair is the ticket for casual, high-elevation-angle viewing, for lower powers at least.

 

Completely agree, my 90 degree eyepieces are supremely comfortable, however my favourite viewing is always looking straight ahead whenever possible.



#30 terraclarke

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Posted Today, 10:34 AM

I have an older Orion Paragon-Plus XHD Extra Heavy-Duty Tripod, the one they used to sell around Y2K. It’s legs are larger in diameter than the one they sell under the same name now and have twist locks for the extensions. I removed the pan-head and put a UA Dwarfstar on it. I made a ‘side-saddle’ for it that mounts to the Dwarfstar with a Vixen rail that is drilled for a pan-handle on the upper side of the rail. The handle also acts as a safety-stop so that the side-saddle can’t slide off if it were loosened under the load. The bino-holder mountsmto the side-saddle with a 1/4-20 large knurled mounting knob. It all works like a champ with my 1995 Orion Japanese 20x80s. I am 5’9” tall and have no problem looking at objects high overhead and the side-saddle changes the center of gravity so there is no flop or slop in the altitude movement of the binoculars. The crank elevator column makes it easy to change elevation of the binoculars as the view angle or altitude of what ever celestial obiject I am looking at changes.


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