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Beginner's Lunar 100

beginner Celestron moon observing
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#1 Tickr

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 01:00 AM

Thought I would share my journey as I embark on observation of the "Lunar 100"

 

As a brief introduction, I've recently rediscovered my childhood passion of astronomy. With most things in life I find it easier and more productive/efficient to follow some type of structured program. I've actually been prepared for this adventure since the end of January, having acquired the obligatory list, moon maps, Rukl Atlas, etc., but of course mother nature was intent on not cooperating.

 

Tonight was the first clear night so far in the month of February here in Central Texas, so the journey has begun!

 

I came across a "day by day" listing of the 100 that gives recommendations to observe certain objects at certain times based on how many days past the New Moon.  Based on this list I had assembled an observation plan below.  I was able to successfully locate each object on my plan, and made a concerted effort to spend some time observing each area and not just rush to find more. Also, I ended up having to turn to my Moon Atlas 3D app, as my printed atlas was difficult to orient. 

 

All observations were made with my 15mm Kellner with 2X Barlow (120x Mag.).  I briefly tried my 9mm Plossyl on a few objects but was not happy with my field of view and eye relief. (another eyepiece upgrade coming soon)

 

    #4    Apennines (Montes Apenninus)

    #19  Alpine Valley (Vallis Alpes)

    #27  Archimedes

    #46  Regiomontanus Central Peak

    #66  Hadley Rille (Rima Hadley)

    #75  Ptolemaeus B

    #76  W. Bond

    #88  Peary

    #92  Gylden Valley

 

In addition to the above items on my original observing plan, I was also able to successfully locate and observed:

 

    #15  Straight Wall (Rupes Recta)

    #26  Mare Frigoris

    #47  Alphonsus

    #51  Davy Crater Chain

    #79  Sinus Aestuum

    #83  Plato Craterlets

 

All-in-all I call it a great observing session, and a great start to my Lunar 100 as a beginner. 

Future posts will likely include some eyepiece projection photos and maybe even a couple stacked images obtained from my "old-fashioned" webcam set up.  I got some pretty decent pics of the eclipse back in January, so I have high hopes of the quality of photos I can get

 

Clear Skies!


Edited by Tickr, 13 February 2019 - 01:17 AM.

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#2 astrochef

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 04:20 PM

Enjoy the journey.

 I've observed most of the 100 over the last few years.  Some have been elusive due to lack of free time to get out and observe.  I seem to catch the Moon at similar phases repeatedly. (Not that I mind re-observing any part of the Moon)  I'm up to about 65 of the 100 in my Lunar 100 gallery of A-focal cell phone pics.  Some better than others, some just place holders till I can get a better shot.  

It never fails to lead to learning even more features.  You'll be observing something off your list and some other crater, rille, dorsa, etc. will catch your eye and you'll be searching for information on that too.  As it snowball out of control it becomes even more fun.

Looking forward to reading more of your reports.


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#3 Tickr

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 07:04 PM

I hadn't thought about trying to get photos of each object. Sounds like a good idea and I might have to start!
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#4 Tickr

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 12:28 AM

Night #2 of my Lunar 100 journey
 
Scattered clouds, but fortunately a clear view of the moon!
 
Again, all observations were made using 15mm Kellner/2X Barlow, (occasionally switching to 3X Barlow for a little closer look, but by far my best views are with the 2X) resulting in 120X magnification.
 
Original observing plan as follows:
 
  #5   Copernicus
  #6   Tycho
  #9   Clavius
  #14 Sinus Iridum
  #60 Kies Pi
  #65 Hortensius dome
  #67 Fra Mauro formation
  #69 Copernicus secondary craters
  #74 Copernicus H
  #78 Lambert R
  #81 Hesiodus A
  #84 Pitatus
  #94 Drygalski  -(Unsuccessful, at least unsure)
 
In addition, I was also able to locate and identify:
  
  #54 Hippalus Rilles (Rimae Hippalus)
  #23 Pico

  
As well as revisiting a few previously listed sights.
 
Definitely the most exciting part of session......At one point, at approximately 2210 local time, I was in the process of changing back from my 15mm/3X Barlow to 2X Barlow, and though I can't be sure WHAT i saw transit the moon, I definitely saw something. My first impression was that is was definitely an artificial satellite but can't say for certain, especially since I'm a firm believer that "eyewitness" account is the WORST form of evidence on the planet. But if pressed, that would by my response.
 
I took a few pics with the smartphone this session, but am unsure how to post them


Edited by Tickr, 16 February 2019 - 12:31 AM.

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#5 SeaBee1

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 10:31 AM

Greetings from a fellow Texan, Tickr!

 

There are several ways to get photos in your post. You can use the attach feature under "More Reply Options", or you can use your gallery here on CN and upload them there, then you would use the picture link process to provide the picture in post, or you can use an offsite picture hosting service, such as PhotoBucket, and then use the linking feature. I stopped using a hosting service when they wanted to charge me for the privilege, but there are free hosting services out there. I now use the gallery here on CN. Just keep in mind that there is a size limitation of 500kb or less for file size., regardless of how the photo is placed in post.

 

Hope this helps!

 

CB



#6 Tickr

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 10:38 AM

SeaBee1
Thanks for the tips. I figured it was fairly simple, just didn't really know where to start. When I get back to the PC later I'll look into the CN gallery option and get a few of my modest pics up.

Thanks again!
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#7 SeaBee1

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 10:55 AM

I would love to see them!

 

Good hunting!

 

CB



#8 Tickr

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 03:08 PM

OK, 

Got a few photos from last night posted in the CN Gallery. Please keep in mind these are smartphone shots, through the eyepiece and handheld.  I welcome any questions, comments or criticism! 

 

Also posted a few shots from the 1/21/19 Total Eclipse. Same equipment and method.


Edited by Tickr, 16 February 2019 - 03:38 PM.

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#9 SeaBee1

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 09:02 PM

Very good for handheld! I can't even get close to that kind of steady.

 

Clear skies!

 

CB



#10 Tickr

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 09:07 PM

Very good for handheld! I can't even get close to that kind of steady.

 

Clear skies!

 

CB

Thanks!

 

I have a logitech webcam that I picked up pretty cheap, and soon found out that the threading on the lens was not "standarad" threading.  I'm lucky enough to live approximately 10 minutes from "ScopeStuff", and kind've know the owner, he was nice enough to basically customize the threads on a webcam adapter for me. I've played with it once, might post some of those pics soon.


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#11 Lunar Orbiter VI

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 07:18 PM

Keep up the journey, yes!

 

I would recommend also looking at the lunar observing certificate program on the American Lunar Society website. The organization seems mostly defunct (anyone know?) but I did the program and sent my notes to Eric Douglass, who issued me a certificate. Thanks Eric!

 

I was going to start the ALPO novice observing program but got sidetracked, happily, by the Royal Canadian Astronomical Society's lunar observing certificate. It has more objects than the ALS, though for ALS I took a lot of observing notes.



#12 Tickr

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:52 PM

I did look into that program. I'm still thinking about it, most likely it will happen. Tha is for the tios!

#13 Tickr

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 11:53 PM

So, scattered clouds and 98% illumination........but I had the itch so out I went!

 

I used this session to practice my orientation and identification of key/prominent features. I am new, after all, so I can use the practice!

 

C.jpg A.jpg


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#14 Tickr

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 11:04 PM

Yet another cloudy night in Central TX

 

Anxiously awaiting the next clear night (with the moon visible, of course) to try out my latest equipment addition. Stopped by Scopestuff today and picked up an Antares W70 9.7mm eyepiece!  

 

This will provide me with approx. 93x magnification used alone, and 185x with a 2x Barlow.  I already had a 9mm Plossyl, but due to the extremely short eye relief it was not fun or comfortable to use at all.  I can't wait to experience the increased magnification with manageable eye relief!

 

Does anyone have any experience with the Antares wide-field eyepieces?

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