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A variety of galaxy shapes

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#1 DaveB

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:08 PM

This image includes NGC 678, 680, 691, 694, 697,and IC 167 (aka Arp 31), along with a number of faint PGC galaxies.

 

It was an unpleasant surprise when I finally got around to processing this image. There were random gradients in most of the subs. Going through them in PixInsight with the Blink tool looked like a 60's music video, with light splotches moving all over the place. There must have been high, thin clouds passing through on one or more of the nights that I gathered subs. I ran DBE over the image quite a number of times to try to flatten the background. It was the worst issue with gradients that I've encountered in an image.

 

The area itself is very interesting, so I may attempt it again to get better data and possibly rotate the image to a better angle.

 

Arp 31 is the two-armed spiral.

 

get.jpg?insecure

 

Thanks for looking. Details are on Abin, but in brief, this was taken with an AT10RC and the AP focal reducer with a QSI-583 camera.


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#2 descott12

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:22 PM

Amazing...what gradients?  I think it is phenomenal



#3 Dan Crowson

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:44 PM

Nice image!
 
Dan



#4 elmiko

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:47 PM

Outstanding!



#5 jerahian

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:52 PM

I agree with Dave and Dan, splendid image...already Liked it on The Bin!!



#6 DaveB

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 11:06 PM

Thanks guys. I can definitely see the gradients (worst one is on the top left, but there are others). I have a tendency of focusing on the flaws in my images shrug.gif .

 

There was one other interesting aspect of this photo. I noticed that this is an area rich with Asteroids. I created this animation using Blink in PixInsight. It is somewhere in the neighborhood of two hours of real time condensed into a ~1.5 second loop. I can count five asteroids, all with the same motion path (diagonally down and to the left). The only one named in the first 70000 asteroids is just below the center of the image. It is designated 20477 Anastroda. I did a little online digging and found that it was named after Anastasia Roda, a finalist in the 2004 Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge, which is/was a middle school science competition. I'm sure that it was pretty cool for her to have an asteroid named after her.

 

p3294837079.gif


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#7 Stelios

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 02:39 PM

@DaveB: I'm not sure what *you* see, but what *we* see is a big light gray square with a lock and a "Content Protected by Owner" legend.

 

Assuming you are the owner of the image, you may want to provide an authentication token of the link, or download, resize, and upload your image independent of Zenfolio.



#8 DaveB

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 06:21 PM

Thanks Stelios, I was trying to embed a GIF. I'll see if I can fix the permissions at the source later this evening.

 

EDIT: I believe that it is visible now, please let me know if it isn't.

 

Thanks again.


Edited by DaveB, 15 February 2019 - 09:15 PM.


#9 sarmen2

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 10:26 PM

Hi,

 

That is a lovely field of view! I've done the same type of blink with PI and found an asteroid, it is very cool. Is it possible these are geostationary satellites? NGC678 is fairly close to the celestial equator. I guess that could only make sense if left side of the frame was N, NE.


Edited by sarmen2, 15 February 2019 - 10:37 PM.


#10 DaveB

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 08:08 PM

Thanks. Actually, the right side is North, so I'm pretty sure that all 5 are asteroids. They have a motion direction that all asteroids in the area seem to have.

 

NOTE: I just noticed that I must have imported the files to Blink from newest to oldest because the asteroids should be going up and to the right, not down and to the left... foreheadslap.gif



#11 sarmen2

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 12:56 AM

Sorry for my way way off assertion about being close to celestial equator. Those galaxies are ~ +22 deg dec. Maybe ngc961 was what I referenced at -6 deg dec instead of ngc691. In any case, geosynchronous satellites should be streaking across the background stars at 15 deg/hr or 15 arcmin/min! 

 

What originally caught my eye was that all of the objects visually looked like they moved at roughly the same rate. I wonder if these were all part of one object in the past?


Edited by sarmen2, 18 February 2019 - 01:22 AM.


#12 DaveB

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:32 AM

Well, somewhat surprising to me before I thought about it is the fact that practically all asteroids move in roughly the same direction and at the same rate. Here is a screenshot showing all of the asteroids in the area of the image (as of now, not when I took the image). All of them to the left and slightly up. Then I took a look at Mars and saw that it travels in a similar manner. Same with Jupiter, although its movement is slower. So basically they are moving in a similar fashion to their nearby solar system neighbors.

 

asteroids.png

 



#13 calypsob

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 02:14 PM

Thanks guys. I can definitely see the gradients (worst one is on the top left, but there are others). I have a tendency of focusing on the flaws in my images shrug.gif .

 

There was one other interesting aspect of this photo. I noticed that this is an area rich with Asteroids. I created this animation using Blink in PixInsight. It is somewhere in the neighborhood of two hours of real time condensed into a ~1.5 second loop. I can count five asteroids, all with the same motion path (diagonally down and to the left). The only one named in the first 70000 asteroids is just below the center of the image. It is designated 20477 Anastroda. I did a little online digging and found that it was named after Anastasia Roda, a finalist in the 2004 Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge, which is/was a middle school science competition. I'm sure that it was pretty cool for her to have an asteroid named after her.

 

 

This is occurring because transparency was not perfect, high thin clouds are passing through the frames. You did a pretty good job of removing the clouds, I find that linear fits really wipes them out, especially if you have a massive set of lights. You also seem to have captured a decent amount of background IFN which probably makes removing gradients pretty tough.




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