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What can you see with a 10inch telescope?

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#1 Pcbessa

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 04:58 PM

Ok, I just bought a XT10i as my second telescope (after a 60mm refractor). I want to know what can you see with it.

 

Would you like to point details about what you can see and what you cannot see with this aperture?

I live in Bortle 4 skies, so quite dark skies (though not excellent skies).

 

These are my expectations based on what I read, but please correct me if I am wrong.

I know that you will be able to see all Messier (most globular clusters resolved, some detail in the brightest galaxies), many NGC objects, and even possibly some of the brightest Abell galaxy clusters. 

 

Limit magnitude would be probably be around 14 to 14.5. 

 

I am assuming you may see under excellent conditions the dark lanes of M31, some nebulas or clusters in M33, an hint of color in M42, and with UHC or OIII, some nebulas like California, Veil. North America, maybe even Horsehead (with a H-beta filter). 

 

How about deep sky objects when the moon is full? What would you see?

 

How about planets?

 

 

Please let me know your highlights!


Edited by Pcbessa, 17 February 2019 - 04:59 PM.


#2 Astrojensen

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 05:07 PM

Why would you like to know all this? Don't take our word for it, but go out and explore and find where YOUR limits are. Use the scope and look at whatever strike your fancy and see what it can show. It's what we've done. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#3 Geo.

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 05:13 PM

"I know that you will be able to see all Messier (most globular clusters resolved, some detail in the brightest galaxies), many NGC objects, and even possibly some of the brightest Abell galaxy clusters."

 

All that and more. With a relatively fast 10" the Universe is yours! You won't live long enough or have enough good to great nights to even dip into much of it. If you have a lot of free time. I'd suggest a subscription to Sky & Telescope and just try to do the monthly observing suggestions. Get Jim O'Meara's books and view those objects, Sue French's anthologies in and out of print. Sue assures me that all royalties go to S&T's publisher, so her tax return won't get anymore complicated.

 

When you are done with that I'll be dead. Ask someone else!


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#4 Stellar1

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 05:37 PM

To start with, a whole wack of stuff!!



#5 pyrasanth

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 05:42 PM

A 10" telescope under a reasonably dark sky begins to put you in the big boys league for telescope aperture. There are so many objects within your grasp especially if you get involved in deep sky photography or indeed the moon & planets. You could never exhaust the opportunities in a lifetime.

 

I love galaxies if I'm honest but mostly under my less than favourable skies I need to photograph them to show all the wonders they hold.

 

My advice would be to get the lowest power eyepiece you can find and sweep the heavens for objects of interest. You might want to get a CLS filter to help mask some of the more pressing light pollution from street lamps & sky glow.


Edited by pyrasanth, 17 February 2019 - 05:43 PM.

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#6 Francopoli

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 05:51 PM

The Herschel 400 program from the Astro Leauge is designed around 8-10" telescopes.  Once you get bored of the moon, planets and Messier objects, the 400 is a good place to graduate towards.

 

https://www.astrolea...l/h400lstc.html


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#7 havasman

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 06:17 PM

Why would you like to know all this? Don't take our word for it, but go out and explore and find where YOUR limits are. Use the scope and look at whatever strike your fancy and see what it can show. It's what we've done. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

THAT!! Absolutely.

 

One thing you may want to realize as you start out with your new scope is that the 1st time you take it out and it just blows you away with its capacity will be the worst session you will ever have with it, exempting conditions, etc. That's because you'll have to learn to use it. At your site(s), with your gear and in your style. As you become more used to it and comfortable with it, its capability will grow beyond what you will initially find. It's a lifetime aperture.


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#8 Sketcher

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 06:20 PM

Walk through the door with a bag of expectations . . . 

There's a reasonable chance of walking out with sorrow and disappointment.

 

Enter with the goal of personal discovery. . .

You may never find (nor care to find) the exit.


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#9 vdog

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 09:21 PM

The sky's the limit!

 

Ok, bad puns aside, I will say that light pollution / atmospheric conditions will always place limits on what you see, but, compared to my smaller dob, my 10" dob offers vastly improved views of the following:

 

Globular clusters (check out M3 and other bright ones; you'll know why you upgraded your aperture)

Galaxies (couldn't really see much besides M31 with my small dob)

Planets (longer focal length, more aperture = higher magnification, better resolution of detail under decent seeing conditions)

Dense open clusters like M37

Fainter NGC objects like Caroline's Rose (under decent LP / transparency conditions)

 

havasman isn't lying about the first time out with a big, new scope, BTW.  Don't worry, though, you'll get used to it.



#10 Keith Rivich

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 09:27 PM

Ok, I just bought a XT10i as my second telescope (after a 60mm refractor). I want to know what can you see with it.

 

Would you like to point details about what you can see and what you cannot see with this aperture?

I live in Bortle 4 skies, so quite dark skies (though not excellent skies).

 

These are my expectations based on what I read, but please correct me if I am wrong.

I know that you will be able to see all Messier (most globular clusters resolved, some detail in the brightest galaxies), many NGC objects, and even possibly some of the brightest Abell galaxy clusters. 

 

Limit magnitude would be probably be around 14 to 14.5. 

 

I am assuming you may see under excellent conditions the dark lanes of M31, some nebulas or clusters in M33, an hint of color in M42, and with UHC or OIII, some nebulas like California, Veil. North America, maybe even Horsehead (with a H-beta filter). 

 

How about deep sky objects when the moon is full? What would you see?

 

How about planets?

 

 

Please let me know your highlights!

How about one year from now you post what you could see. And what you did not see. 



#11 kfiscus

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 09:33 PM

You and your new scope will become a powerful combination.  You need to train and train and train your eye-brain combo as you work on familiar and new-to-you objects.  I grew up in the 80s and dreamed of eventually getting a 10" scope.  Reading "Burnham's Celestial Handbook" had me aware of the supposed limits of 10" scopes.  The ultimate challenges it presented were the Horsehead Nebula and Stephan's Quintet.  You can get them if your skies are dark enough and you have trained your eye-brain combo.  Good luck!


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#12 Asbytec

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:27 AM

"No train, no gain"...the more you look, the more you learn to see. What can you see in a 10"? A lot...and then some. 

 

PS, when I hear folks asking what can I see with a 10", it's kind of the wrong question as it seems to emphasize the aperture. The emphasis should be on the observer. It kind of reminds me of Kennedy's famous speech, "ask not what your telescope can do for you, ask what you can do with your telescope." Emphasis: Observer. 

 

A Novice will see something, a skilled observer can see quite a bit more...in the same 10" scope. Really, it depends on the observer up to the point even Superman cannot see more because we've exceeded our own physiology. Some things just become too small and dim to see in a 10" by anybody, but until then...there's a lot to see and then some. 

 

I still have not seen everything a 6" can show me, Oppps! What I mean is, everything I can see through a 6" aperture! I am just getting started with an 8" f/6 and have a long way to go. So I cannot answer what you or I can see in a 10". The list is too long and the training hard, er, enjoyable. smile.gif

 

A 16" will expand your ability to see more, of course, but a 10" will keep you plenty busy and satisfied (mostly), especially once you learn to emphasis the observer and take responsibility for what you will or will not see. Go see what you can see. Spiral arms? Sure...I think your skies are dark enough for a keen eye observing with confidence. 


Edited by Asbytec, 18 February 2019 - 09:30 AM.

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#13 Don H

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 08:29 PM

The California Nebula is not a good candidate for your new 10 inch, since it is very large and faint. But almost everything else you mentioned should be great.



#14 Starman1

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:25 PM

Ok, I just bought a XT10i as my second telescope (after a 60mm refractor). I want to know what can you see with it.

Would you like to point details about what you can see and what you cannot see with this aperture?
I live in Bortle 4 skies, so quite dark skies (though not excellent skies).

These are my expectations based on what I read, but please correct me if I am wrong.
I know that you will be able to see all Messier (most globular clusters resolved, some detail in the brightest galaxies), many NGC objects, and even possibly some of the brightest Abell galaxy clusters.

Limit magnitude would be probably be around 14 to 14.5.

I am assuming you may see under excellent conditions the dark lanes of M31, some nebulas or clusters in M33, an hint of color in M42, and with UHC or OIII, some nebulas like California, Veil. North America, maybe even Horsehead (with a H-beta filter).

How about deep sky objects when the moon is full? What would you see?

How about planets?


Please let me know your highlights!

Literally thousands of objects. Thousands of star clusters, thousands of galaxies, etc.
Maybe a total of well over 15K objects.
And if you do limiting magnitude star searches, you will get to magnitude 16 under ideal conditions (no moon).
Planets will be, like the moon, very detailed under conditions of good seeing.
Your observing limits and skills will improve with time. But you will be very surprised.
At the start, download the list at the top of the Deep Sky Forum called "500 Best DSOs".
They're all bright in the 10" aperture.
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#15 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:37 PM

In addition to Don's fine list mentioned above, here are a few more.

 

http://messier.seds....r/sac110bn.html (the SAC's best objects in the NGC list)

 

http://messier.seds....r/rasc-ngc.html (the RASC's finest NGC objects list)

 

http://www.tyler.net...pot/saa100.html (the sci.astro.amateur 100)

 

http://www.taas.org/...00/taas200.html (the TAAS 200)

 

https://www.astrolea...00/h400lstn.pdf (the Astronomical League's Herschel 400)

 

http://www.stpeteast...ces/thelist.pdf (Vic Menard's list of 400 objects)

 

https://www.cloudyni...-best-dso-list/ (Don Pensack's 500 Best Deep Sky Objects List)

 

http://www.raycash.org/dm600.htm (the Orion Deep Map 600)

 

http://www.clarkvisi...appendix-e.html (Roger Clark's catalog of 611 deep-sky objects)

 

http://messier.seds....lar/BElistA.txt (the Boyd Edwards list of 884 objects)

 

http://messier.seds....milar/m1000.txt (the Magnificent 1000 by Tom Hoffelder)

 

http://www.1000plus.com/2000plus/ (the Tomm Lorenzin 2000+)

 

http://www.astroleag...r/dblstar2.html (binary stars)

 

http://www.skyandtel...h/double-stars/ (binary stars)

 

https://www.astrolea...bonStarLog3.pdf (carbon stars)

 

http://www.skyandtel...-red1203201401/ (carbon stars)

 

http://www.eaglecree...eco/carbon.html (carbon stars)

 

http://www.astrosurf...iar2/carbon.htm (carbon stars)

 

http://www.1000plus.com/redstars.htm (carbon stars)

 

http://www.nckas.org/carbonstars/ (carbon stars)
 

The following are the monthly top ten DSO lists from my Celestial Calendar:
 

Top ten deep-sky objects for January: M1, M36, M37, M38, M42, M43, M78, M79, NGC 1501, NGC 2024

The objects listed above are located between 4:00 and 6:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for February: M35, M41, M46, M47, M50, M93, NGC 2261, NGC 2362, NGC 2392, NGC 2403

The objects listed above are located between 6:00 and 8:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for March: M44, M48, M67, M81, M82, NGC 2654, NGC 2683, NGC 2835, NGC 2841, NGC 2903

The objects listed above are located between 8:00 and 10:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for April: M65, M66, M95, M96, M97, M105, M108, NGC 3115, NGC 3242, NGC 3628

The objects listed above are located between 10:00 and 12:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for May: M3, M51, M63, M64, M83, M87, M104, M106, NGC 4449, NGC 4565

The objects listed above are located between 12:00 and 14:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for June: M5, M101, M102, NGC 5566, NGC 5585, NGC 5689, NGC 5746, NGC 5813, NGC 5838, NGC 5907

The objects listed above are located between 14:00 and 16:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for July: M4, M6, M7, M10, M12, M13, M92, NGC 6210, NGC 6231, NGC 6543

The objects listed above are located between 16:00 and 18:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for August: M8, M11, M16, M17, M20, M22, M24, M27, M55, M57

The objects listed above are located between 18:00 and 20:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for September: IC 1396, M2, M15, M30, NGC 6888, NGC 6946, NGC 6960, NGC 6992, NGC 7000, NGC 7009

The objects listed above are located between 20:00 and 22:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for October: K12, M52, NGC 7209, NGC 7293, NGC 7331, NGC 7332, NGC 7339, NGC 7640, NGC 7662, NGC 7789

The objects listed above are located between 22:00 and 24:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for November: M31, M32, M33, M76, M103, M110, NGC 40, NGC 253, NGC 457, NGC 752

The objects listed above are located between 0:00 and 2:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for December: M34, M45, M77, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 891, NGC 1023, NGC 1232, NGC 1332, NGC 1360

The objects listed above are located between 2:00 and 4:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Dave Mitsky


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#16 Pcbessa

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 06:46 PM

Hi, I got already three nights with my 10inch. Oh what a journey so far!

Stephan Quartet does not seem to be the limit for a 10"...

I went straight into Abell galaxy cluster hunting. It's amazing. In Leo cluster I could see a few handful of galaxies in the field of view. I saw other clusters like Perseu. But I haven't tried Stephan Quartet yet. The Messier pairs in Leo and Ursa Major are amazing to see. M101 continuesto be a dull object.

I started seeing the first extragalactic objects in m33 and the first dark lane of m31.

Messier objects are quite outstanding. Galaxies especially. Orion nebula shows a hint of color and spectacular detail.
But couldn't see any other nebula yet. California remains invisible. The nebula near horsehead also remains invisible. Metope nebula is still a faint haze. Haven't tried a filter yet. So that's a limit for this scope.

Saw many NgC objects: the Intelliscope really helps finding them. Planetary nebulas are very nice to see.

And yesterday I could barely see a very distant quasar at magnitude 15, Andromeda Parachute, which seems to be sort of the limit of this scope (until I find a new limit!). Pluto may be another such limit.

Yesterday also saw first globular clusters with this scope. It was a wow moment.

#17 Mike Lynch

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 07:56 PM

The California Nebula is not a good candidate for your new 10 inch, since it is very large and faint. But almost everything else you mentioned should be great.

 

Don,

 

   I gently beg to differ!  My old 10.1" Coulter Odyssey Compact (f/4.5) will show hints of the California Nebula with low-power, wide field eyepieces, under dark skies...and when I add an H-beta filter, it essentially becomes obvious.

 

   Yes, it's a challenge object for my scope, but challenge objects make for good observing.



#18 Starman1

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 08:52 PM

I didn't mean you wouldn't see it, merely that it would be too large for the field.

It's great in a telescope with a 500-700mm focal length.



#19 Illinois

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 08:07 AM

you will see so many NGC and all Messier objects in 10 inch! I used have 10 inch and love it then I jumped to 16 inch! I was use 4.5 inch F5 reflection in dark sky in upper Michigan. I saw Veil Nebula and many Messier and NGC objects so image that what will you see in 10 inch compare to 4.5 inch! Planets is great in 10 inch but make sure right cooling time for better view!


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