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Object near M42

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#26 Dan Crowson

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 03:29 PM

That being the case, you have both a beautiful deep sky image image and significant solar system object capture.  Is there anyway to use the planetarium SW to predict when such cluster events will happen?  I would like to try a capture.

I would just use your planetarium program of of choice with a large asteroid database loaded. I would figure out how deep you can go and limit it to show only brighter objects. Keep in mind that these are moving so while you might be able to get to 20th mag on a star, it could be 17 on slower-moving asteroids or comets. At this point, if you look in the 'asteroid zone', I'm sure you'll find numerous opportunities on a nightly basis. I tend to do this kind of thing when the moon is getting brighter and I can point somewhere opposite.

 

Here's what TSX looks like for my FoV tonight. I just pulled up the galaxy mentioned above and moved around a bit.

 

2019-02-21.jpg

 

I would add that one of my reasons for liking TSX for this kind of thing is that it gives Ra/Dec movement rates. I'm sure others do something similar. I can use these numbers along with my arcsec/pixel ratio to determine how long I can expose before I see trailing. Think having a 17th magnitude asteroid going by earth. That can be captured from the city with my refractor or so it seems. Once I figure out that it will trail in a couple seconds, capturing isn't so easy.

 

Dan



#27 Zebenelgenubi

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 10:13 PM

Dan,

 

Thanks.  Do the vectors in graphic only indicate direction or both direction and the size of the angle displacement?  If both, what is the time period for the displacement?



#28 Wildetelescope

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 10:25 PM

My vote is an asteroid. My planetarium program show asteroid 65235 2002 EG97 at mag 19.1 going through Orion but on the east side, while your image shows your object on the west side (unless the image is rotated). The path (direction and length) of 65235 2002 EG97 are consistent with what you see in your image, which is a good indicator since asteroids usually follow the same path as their neighbors. My asteroid catalog only has 70,000 in it, however, so there are many more asteroids that aren't in my catalog snippet.

 

 

Here is an image that I posted in another thread that showed 5 asteroids, only one of which is listed in the first 70,000 numbered asteroids. As you can see, they all travel along the same path.

 

p3294837079.gif

This has got to be one of the coolest things I have seen!  Thanks for posting!

JMD



#29 DaveB

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Posted 22 February 2019 - 10:48 PM


This has got to be one of the coolest things I have seen! Thanks for posting!
JMD

Thanks!
 

That being the case, you have both a beautiful deep sky image image and significant solar system object capture.  Is there anyway to use the planetarium SW to predict when such cluster events will happen?  I would like to try a capture.

I have a different planetarium than Dan (I use Skymap Pro), but it has similar features, as do many planetarium programs, both free and commercial. Skymap doesn't have the vectors like TSX has, but it does allow you to animate the movement of the asteroids. I'm guessing that TSX does as well, but I'm not familiar with it. The screenshot gif below shows the screen updating every 2 seconds for one hour of simulated time. This screenshot shows the planetarium prediction of the real gif that I posted earlier, although this simulation is rotated 90 degrees from the image. The large rectangle represents the FOV of my camera/scope combo used for the image. You can see that the asteroids mostly move together, except for the asteroid in the top left of the screen. (Sorry it's so small, I struggled with the gif conversion.)

 

p3305053678.gif

 

In terms of predictions, you can set the time of the planetarium to whatever you want. If you plan on imaging tomorrow night, for example, set the program to show the sky for that time, and start looking around. I don't think that there is a fancy way to search for when asteroids will be near DSOs, at least that I'm aware. One important item is to make sure that you have an asteroid catalog with at least 100000 asteroids in it. Once you do that, you'll realize that it isn't an uncommon occurrence, especially when imaging around the galactic equator.



#30 DaveB

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Posted 22 February 2019 - 11:01 PM

I just did a quick check to see if I could find another decent target. Here is the asteroid activity around Markarian's chain tonight. Note the magnitudes, many of these are around mag 20, so probably not visible in small refractors. But a few should be bright enough.

 

mark.png



#31 freestar8n

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Posted 22 February 2019 - 11:57 PM

Slight correction. Galactic equator is good place to find stars. Ecliptic is good for asteroids.

Frank
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#32 DaveB

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 01:18 AM

Slight correction. Galactic equator is good place to find stars. Ecliptic is good for asteroids.

Frank

Dooooh! foreheadslap.gif  Thanks for correcting that.




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