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Mewlon 180 First Light

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#1 Ruknight4ever

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 07:33 AM

Hi Everyone,

 

I received my Mewlon 180 yesterday and wanted to provide everyone a first light review. 

 

My Astronomy Experience:
Let me start my baselining my experience so you can take this review for what it's worth.  My interest in astronomy started with a red 3" Tasco refractor I bought from Macy's when I was 12 years old so I can chase Halley's comet and Saturn/Jupiter.  After college, I purchased a LX90 and the Meade eyepiece kit ($149 for 7 eyepieces, a barlow and filters).  After 20 years, I developed a much deeper interest in the hobby and purchased a Celestron 9.25 and a Losmandy G811, as well as several TV eyepieces.  Several months later I purchased a Televue NP101is and a Stellarvue M2C mount with encoders.  I sold the C9.25 and purchased the Mewlon.

 

So - in short - like all of us, I'm still learning.  I not going to say something like "my scope has diffraction limited optics" - I know what that means but I'm not sure my eye does!

 

Where I Observe:
I live in southern Maine - we have beautiful but cold winters.  Skies are dark but typically turbulent.  When I observed yesterday, temperature was about 30 degrees when I started and dropped to the high teens when I wrapped up.  We have snow on the ground so there was some snow glare from the nearby houses and exterior lights.

 

What I Considered before Buying the Mewlon:
I considered the SW/Orion 150 and 180 Maks.  I wanted more aperture than the 150 and wasn't sure if I would have issues with the massive FL in the 180 given my turbulent skies.  I ultimately decided not to purchase either as I wasn't convinced they would cool down, and remained cooled down, properly during my Maine winters.

 

I considered the SW120 refractor.  However, I wanted more then 20mm additional aperture than my NP101is.

 

I briefly considered the AT and ES 150 achromats for a trade off between large aperture and cost.  I quickly decided against them.  I'm sure they are great for the cost - but thought they would remain in my closet as I continued to compare their views and false color to my current refractor.

 

I bought the Mewlon for the simple fact that it was the right price, the right aperture, the right focal length, and the right quality.  Right wrong or indifferent - I feel you never need to question Tak quality.

 

Unboxing:
The Mewlon 180 was packed TIGHTLY with an outer shipping box and an inner protective box.  Between the use of foam supports,  cardboard and packing pellets - the scope had no room to move at all during shipment. 

 

I believe I made one mistake when trying to remove the scope from it's tight tomb.  When I cut the packing tape on the inner box, I was very careful not to plunge the knife deeper than needed to cut the tape.  However, after opening the box, the included Tak certificate of inspection was cut in two.   I am not sure if I did this, or the certificate came that way.  Either way - I am writing Tak and requesting a replacement.

 

Fit and Finish:
In short - the scope is a beauty.  I guess I can understand some of the comments that it looks more like medical equipment than a fancy piece of hardware worthy of it's high price.  Astronomy is science!  I not looking to go clubbing with skinny jeans when I take my telescope out for a night of observing.  It’s beautiful to me.  The paint is THICK and was very evenly applied.  In comparison, my C9.25 felt to me that it only had 1-2 coats of paint as it felt very thin to the touch.  The body of the Mewlon feels like it received 4-5 coats of paint before it left the factory.  The focuser is very smooth and precise.  The other hardware (Vixen dovetail, diagonal adapter, etc) all seem top shelf.

 

I purchased the Mewlon 180 from Woodland Hills.  Daniel wasn't 100% sure if the Mewlon would mount to my M2C and G811 without the need for an adapter (because the supplied vixen dovetail mounts to a wider mounting plate and he wasn’t sure ion the wider mounting plate would interfere with tightening the saddle).  He offered to include a Losmandy branded vixen dovetail free of charge (to act as an extender between the Tak's vixen dovetail and the Tak's wider mounting plate) just to ensure I could use the telescope when received.  That was very nice of him - but it turned out to be unnecessary.  I emailed him this morning to let him know the Mewlon mounts to the saddles included with the G811 and M2C mounts without any need for modification.

 

The paint inside of the tube is a very flat black - so flat it almost appears gray.  The tube itself must be forged versus cast because you can see the (somewhat rough) soider line extending from the front of the tube to the back.  For those unaware of manufacturing techniques,  casting is the process where metal is heated until molten and the molten metal is poured into a mold to create a desired shape. Forging is the application of force to hard metal to cause the material to change shape while in a solid state.

 

The primary mirror was blindingly bright when I flashed the headlamp on it.

 

Setup:
This first light report was mounting the Mewlon 180 with the M2C mount.  Don't get me wrong - I love the Losmandy G811, but that M2C with encoders has turned into my favorite mount.

 

The Mewlon 180 is light - much lighter than I expected.  That's due to no corrector or meniscus plate as this is an open tube design.  I can carry the scope/eyepieces in one hand and the M2C mount in the other when I walk to my observing spot (about 300' from my house - my house it surrounded by trees).  

 

I mounted the Mewlon 180 on both my G811 and M2C.  The supplied vixen dovetail is short (6 or 7 inches), but the entire dovetail is caught inside of both saddles after balancing the Mewlon with a 2" diagonal and a 17.3mm Delos.  No part of the saddle is left open and not affixed to the dovetail (i.e. the saddle completely covers the vixen dovetail).  In other words - the telescope balances nicely even with the short supplied dovetail.  I balanced the Mewlon on the G811 in both RA and Dec with no clutches, and balanced the Mewlon on the M2C in Alt/Az with no pressure on the brake.

  

Finderscope:
I attached the scope to the M2C saddle and turned on Sky Safari Pro for the 2 star alignment.  I thought I would have a dickens of a time finding the first star in the eyepiece since the Mewlon has a much more limited FOV than my NP101is (although the FOV for the Mewlon is slightly larger than with my C9.25).  I figured the finderscope would be out of alignment (shipping from Japan to California to Maine) and planned to spend 30 minutes to get the finderscope aligned to the eyepiece.  WRONG!  I centered the finderscope on Polaris and looked through the eyepiece with my Delos 17.3 - BAM - right in the center.  I had to shake my head and do a double take as I was assuming I was seeing things!  Nope - Polaris was right in the center of the FOV.  This was after using the finderscope base as a handle (recommended by Tak) when I was trying to manhandle the scope out of it's tight packing. 

 

How do they do that?  On my C9.25, it I just looked at the finderscope the wrong way - it went out of alignment (if I sneezed - forget it!).  Ok - obviously I am exaggerating - but I did find myself always needing to align the C9.25 finderscope to the eyepiece and always had to be careful not to touch it when I mounted/unmounted it.  I doubt I will have that issue with the Mewlon.

 

The finderscope also had beautiful optics.  I am sure the optics on the finderscope are better than some telescopes.  I was pleasantly surprised.

 

This morning - I mounted the Mewlon on my G811.  I didn't notice this yesterday because, on the M2C Alt/Az mount, the telescope mounts the saddle "to the side" whereas on the EQ mount the telescope mounts to the saddle on top.  The finderscope is also mounted directly on top of the telescope (versus to the side like in SCTs and refractors).  So - you can't have the the diagonal pointed straight up with an eyepiece it - if so, it blocks your view through the finderscope.  Obviously - this is no big deal since you can just rotate the diagonal to the side by 10 degrees (and you always rotate the diagonal when using an EQ mount to find the most desirable viewing angle).  Mewlon's finderscope center mounting position is just different from what I am accustomed to.

 

What I Observed With:

I used the Mewlon with the following equipment:

1. TV Delos 10mm

2. TV Delos 17.3mm

3. TV Pantopic 35mm

4. TV 2" Everbrite Diagonal 

5. Stellarvue Illuminated Reticle

 

Masked Primary Mirror:

The end of the main tube (where the spider and secondary mirror is mounted) is curved inward.  This has the effect of masking the primary mirror.  I read this is done because the very edges of the mirror are hard to polish to the quality of the rest of the mirror.  So - the primary mirror is actually more than 180mm but the telescope is marketed as a 180mm scope due to the masking.  I have to assume Tak scientists like because it delivers better overall quality of image, but Tak marketing does not because they can't market this as a 195mm (or so) scope!

 

The diameter of the unmasked opening is 184mm.

 

Mirror Shift:

I tested for mirror shift using my illuminated reticle and racking the focuser back and forth when checking collimation.  Polaris moved slightly during the racking, but returned to the same place after going back to focus.   I plan to test more for mirror shift when I mount the Mewton to my tracking G811 mount to avoid any issues with pressure of changing focus would slightly move the OTA.

 

Diffraction Spikes:
After aligning the scope via Sky Safari, I went back to Polaris to check collimation.  It seemed like collimation was slightly off, but I wasn't 100% sure so I went to observing.  I went to Sirius - big beautiful blue ball with diffraction spikes.  So - let me give you my perspective on these "awful" diffraction spikes.  They are a nit!  Even on Sirius, the diffraction spikes were so muted.  Would I prefer they weren't there?  Probably.  Did they impact my viewing - not at all.  In fact - they looked somewhat beautiful.

 

Let me provide some more perspective.  I moved the scope to Rigel and was able to resolve that double with my 17.3 Delos.  The smaller star in Rigel was literally right on the diffraction spike but very easy to see and differentiate between that faint star and the spike.  The spikes didn't appear on fainter objects.  Again - when they were visible - I didn't find they distracted from my viewing experience.

 

Coma:
I read a lot about the Mewlon 180 having coma for stars at the periphery.  I know it's there - but I really couldn't find it when viewing the Double Cluster.  I'm sure it's more discernible during imaging.  I may have missed it just due to my experience - but truthfully I didn't see it.  It's possible it was there, but what I saw wasn't objectionable to me.  I noticed more coma in my C9.25 which seems counter to what I was expecting. 

 

If I moved the telescope out of focus and moved the star off axis, there was tons of coma.  That's as close as I got to seeing it.

 

Observing:
I used the Mewlon to check out Orion's Nebula - one of my favorite winter time objects.  I definitely resolved more of the nebula as when compared to my NP101is. The nebula looked like an eagle with wings extended to the left and right, whereas I only see the core with my refractor.  I then went to Pleiades - the stars looked nice but I was just able to fit the main stars in one FOV when using my Pantopic 35mm (I am able to easily fit M45 using a Delos 17.3 in my NP101is).  In regards to DSOs - I was able to see some nice detail in Bodes nebula and Cigar.  Cigar was much more pronounced that Bodes.  I was able to resolve the faint double star that resides just outside Bodes.  I saw many more stars in the Double Cluster than I do in my NP101is - however the view of this cluster is more pleasant in a wide field refractor.  I didn't purchase the Mewlon for M45 or the double cluster.

 

Collimation:
After 2 hours of observing, I went back to Polaris to check collimation.  After careful consideration and knowing the scope was cooled down - I was sure it was slightly off so I took out my illuminated reticle to ensure Polaris was in the center of the FOV.  I then went to my Delos 10mm, defocused the image, and tweaked the collimation screws.  I barely turned them - one click here, one click there.  I kept switching back and forth between the illuminated reticle and the Delos 10mm to ensure Polaris remained in the center of the FOV.  After an hour of going back and forth, I got it exactly where I wanted it and then went back to viewing.  To be truthful, I didn't notice any difference in my visual image.  I've read that collimation for Mewlons was critically important (much more important than SCTs or Maks) - but I didn't find that to be the case.  I will check collimation next time I take the scope outside to confirm I have it right where I want it.

 

I've read that collimating the Mewlon was more problematic than an SCT or Mak.  I’m not sure why - the process seemed the same to me.  Actually - it was easier because the Mewlon doesn’t need a dew shield so there was no need to ‘reach in’ to reach the screws for the secondary mirror.

 

Packing Up:
Removing the scope from the mount was easy.  The finderscope base can be used as a handle, and the telescope is as light as a small refractor.  I shined my headlamp on the primary mirror after my 4+ hours of observing and there was no trace of dew on the primary.  Ice/frost was forming on my eyepiece case so if dew was to be an issue - it would have been evident last night.

 

For now, I am planning to use the inner shipping box to store the Mewlon in a Sterilite container (Sterilite part number 14699002).  The box literally fits perfectly in the Sterilite container.  I'd like to find a better solution going forward (the cardboard is of high quality but how long can it last?).  I believe laying a bed comforter in the Sterilite container and then wrapping up the telescope during transport would provide  sufficient protection.

 

Final Verdict:
Ok - so what do I think of this reflector?  In short - it's very nice.  Would I call the images "refractor like"?  Probably not - but I am comparing that to my NP101is.  I would consider the images better than the C9.25, but a step below a refractor.  If I had to choose between my NP101is and Mewlon 180 - I would pick the NP101is due to the wide field and crisp optics.  However, ask me that question when Jupiter and Saturn are high in the night sky this summer (high being relative to what we can expect in 2019) and when I have a 2nd and 3rd chance to confirm collimation - my opinion may change!  I bought the Mewlon for planetary and double stars, as well as extra light/resolving power for DSOs.  It's a keeper.


Edited by Ruknight4ever, 24 February 2019 - 07:15 AM.

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#2 Steve D.

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 08:52 AM

Great review.  Thanks for sharing your experience.



#3 Stellar1

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 08:57 AM

Nice report, I’ll be waiting for that report with planetary included, I often found myself daydreaming about the Mewlon.


Edited by Stellar1, 23 February 2019 - 08:58 AM.


#4 JoshH

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 11:19 AM

Very nice review. Do you have any plans to get the reducer for visual observing? 



#5 Ruknight4ever

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 01:12 PM

Thanks everyone. Josh - I was considering a reduced/flatter for my C9.25 before I sold it. My Astro guru (Bradley - he’s in CN) was recommending it to me. It will make the more scope more versatile for those wider objects like Pleadias and the Double Cluster. So - yes - I am considering one but not right away. I want more time behind the eyepiece of the Mewlon.

Edited by Ruknight4ever, 23 February 2019 - 01:13 PM.


#6 JoshH

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 01:33 PM

If/when you do please post your thoughts on performance with it. 



#7 Dave R

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:19 PM

Thanks for the review. What kind of diagonal do you use with this?

Thanks

David



#8 The Ardent

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 05:11 PM

Thanks for the review.

A couple of years ago I ordered the new Mewlon-180 when it was announced. After a few months of waiting I changed my order to the TSA-120 instead. My thinking is it’s easier to make the TSA act like 2100mm focal length than the Mewlon to act like 900mm. And Jupiter and Saturn so far south for years, no telescope will fix that. Only time.
The op presents a similar situation with his refractor.

I would still like to try the 180 one day. The compact size and lack of dew-prone corrector appeal to me.
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#9 bobhen

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 05:39 PM

I have a Tak TSA 120 and a Mewlon 210 and based on my experience with that combination I think a nice Mewlon and apo refractor combination would be something like…

 

85 - 102mm apo refractor and Mewlon 180
115 - 120mm apo refractor and Mewlon 210
130 - 150mm apo refractor and Mewlon 250

 

Bob


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#10 AlienRatDog

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 08:00 PM

Where are the pics? I’m considering this set up after my post doc. I have been using my 127mm mak and an Altaz Mount almost exclusively lately.

#11 JoshH

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 08:02 PM

A friend of mine is also considering this scope, he called Texas Nautical today and apparently the focal reducer can't be used visually. 


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#12 dr.who

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 11:22 PM

An excellent review. Thank you. Like Bob I have a TSA-120 and Mewlon 210. It is an excellent pairing. I think your 180 and NP101 will be as well. If you can scare up a Losmandy AZ8 or other dual saddle mount like the Skywatcher AZ-EQ5 I think you will be very pleasantly surprised at how well they do side by side at the same time. It really opens up a host of observing combinations in terms of targets to go after.



#13 jeremiah2229

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 01:16 AM

Thank you for the review Ruknight, lots to glean from this.  waytogo.gif

 

I had no idea the finder was positioned as you shared, always thought it was a bit off center but all I've ever seen are pictures on vendors sites and they are all the same it seems so this is good to know.

 

Question...

How is the balance with the 2" diagonal on the M2C? Do you have enough dovetail to balance with the clutches free or do you need to use them and if yes how much? Perhaps I'm asking if the 180 is back end heavy or well balanced. Well both I guess haha.

 

Your description of M42 made me think of of M16 and what you will find in the summer Milky Way, should be a treat.  ;)

 

 

Thanks...



#14 greenstars3

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 03:03 AM

Ruknight,

 

Thank you for this great info, my 180 Mewlon should arrive sometime this coming week or next 

Your report makes me very happy smile.gif. I will be very careful not to cut the paperwork in the second box.

Did you save the packing from the boxes, and does it appear that a suitable storage-transport box can be built around what Tak sent 

 

Thanks

Robert



#15 Ruknight4ever

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 07:28 AM

Hi Everyone,

 

I received several questions on this thread and via PM.  I updated my review to include these answers (mirror shift, how I plan to store the telescope, saddle coverage, etc).  I copied the pertinent ones below:

 

1. I was not bashing Mak Cass telescopes.  I know the quality of these Chinese scopes are very good - I never read one negative review.  I felt that a personally inspected Tak would just have a better chance to be of overall better quality than a telescope not personally inspected.  If I didn't live in Maine, I may have ended up with the the SW180.  I was concerned the scope wouldn't remained cooled down enough as temperatures dropped during my winter observing.  I could be wrong.

 

2. I received a few questions regarding forged versus cast.  I included a summary above.  I'm a woodsmith and not a metal worker - but appreciate the difference between both manufacturing techniques.   In short - forging process is better and more expensive than the casting process.  That doesn't mean casting is bad (most things now-a-days are cast).  All things being equal -  forging is better quality and stronger since the metal isn't brought to a molten state before being dipped into a vessel.

 

3. I measured the unmasked opening - it's 184mm.  I am assuming Tak rounds down to 180mm since 180mm is the "standard" - only guessing.

 

4. Mirror Shift: I took the scope out yesterday evening to test more specifically for mirror shift.  I tested for shift using my illuminated reticle and racking the focuser back and forth when checking collimation.  Polaris moved slightly during the racking, but returned to the same place after going back to focus.   I plan to test more for mirror shift when I mount the Mewton to my tracking G811 mount to avoid any issues with pressure of changing focus would slightly move the OTA.

 

5. I used the Mewlon with the following equipment: TV Delos 10mm, TV Delos 17.3mm, TV Pantopic 35mm, TV Everbrite DIagonal, Stellarvue Illuminated Reticle.

 

6. For now, I am planning to use the inner shipping box to store the Mewlon in a Sterilite container (Sterilite part number 14699002).  The box literally fits perfectly in the Sterilite container.  I'd like to find a better solution going forward (the cardboard is of high quality but how long can it last?).  I believe laying a bed comforter in the Sterilite container and then wrapping up the telescope during transport would provide  sufficient protection.

 

7. I mounted the Mewlon 180 on both my G811 and M2C.  The supplied vixen dovetail is short (6 or 7 inches), but the entire dovetail is caught inside of both saddles after balancing the Mewlon with a 2" diagonal and a 17.3mm Delos.  No part of the saddle is left open and not clamped to the dovetail (i.e. the saddle completely covers the vixen dovetail).  In other words - the telescope balances nicely even with the short supplied dovetail.  I balanced the Mewlon on the G811 in both RA and Dec with no clutches, and balanced the Mewlon on the M2C in Alt/Az with no pressure on the brake.


Edited by Ruknight4ever, 24 February 2019 - 07:32 AM.

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#16 plyscope

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 08:05 AM

Thanks for the review.

 

Here is a link to an earlier thread with more info and pictures:

 

https://www.cloudyni...ew-mewlon-180c/


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#17 Dennis53121

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 09:24 AM

Ruknight,

 

Thank you for your review of the Mewlon 180C. I received my new Mewlon 180C on February 11th however I still have not been able to give it first light due to the weather here in Wisconsin frown.gif . I purchased mine for many of the same reasons that you stated. I plan to use mine along along with my Tak FC-100DF but on separate mounts for most of my observing. Regarding a case for the Mewlon 180C, I am using a Pelican 1650 and the scope fits like a glove (not an OJ glove). Send me some good weather and clear skies if you can.

 

Dennis


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#18 Starman27

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 11:09 AM

Wonderful review and first light. Thank you.



#19 Ed Kessler

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 01:50 PM

I have an FC-100DF and a Mewlon 180c.  They make a great combo.


Edited by Ed Kessler, 24 February 2019 - 01:52 PM.


#20 payner

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 02:05 PM

Great write-up of your initial results of both optical and mechanical qualities.  Thanks for taking the time to share that with us.

 

Best,
Randy



#21 Bill Barlow

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 02:51 PM

Thanks for the great review.  Did you have any issues using the straight-thru finder when you pointed the scope vertically?  The main reason I haven't bought a Mewlon is the lack of a RACI finder scope.  I solely use UA altaz mounts and Orion 8x50 RACI finders.  I know there is an add-on option from TS in Germany to make the Tak 50mm finderscope a RACI, but not sure of one for the newer 180 Mewlon 30mm finderscope.  

 

Anyway I hope you enjoy your 180 Mewlon.

 

Bill



#22 Tyson M

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 03:26 PM

The Mewlon is one scope I hope to own in the distant future.

 

Thank you for your review.



#23 Ruknight4ever

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 03:44 PM

Bill,

 

That's a great question and I should have addressed it in my review - especially in light of all the comments/questions I received on the finderscope.

 

I only used the Mewlon in my M2C Alt/Az mount.  The telescope attaches to the saddle at the side - that saddle faces either the 9 o'clock or the 3 o'clock position when attaching the scope.  I found Mewlon's straight through finder easy to use with an Alt/Az mount.  I prefer the fact the finderscope is mounted directly on top of the body of the scope versus ~20-30 degrees to the right like my C9.25 and many other scopes.  I say that because, when the scope is attached to the saddle, the Mewlon's finderscope is at the 3 o'clock position whereas the C9.25 finderscope was at the ~5 o'clock position.  It was more awkward to use the finderscope on the Alt/Az mount when the finderscope was positioned so low and almost "underneath" the telescope.  

 

I say the Mewlon's finderscope is easy to use -  but please remember I only use to finderscope to align 2 stars for SkySafari and I select stars near the zenith for alignment.  When I mounted my C9.25 on the M2C, I found that straight through finder to be more difficult because it was positioned underneath the scope. 

 

I mounted the Mewlon to my EQ mount and tested what you asked.  I think here it will be a little more problematic all based on all the positions the telescope can be orientated when aligning to the night sky.  Mewlon zenith viewing through the straight through finderscope requires the same level of yoga moves when compared to C9.25's straight through finderscope.  However, I oftentimes aligned to zenith stars using the C9.25 and EQ mount - just had to do some gymnastics to see if the star was centered in the finderscope.  So - I don't think it will be an issue long term since I only use the finderscope to do the initial alignment.  If I was a star hopper using an EQ mount - I think I'd have to practice more yoga.  LOL

 

I considered upgrading to a RACI on my C9.25 but never did.  In my opinion - I think the straight through finder is a non issue with an alt/az mount be it for initial SkySafari alignment only or for star hopping (recognizing the star hopping would prove more difficult as you point higher towards the zenith).  if you are using the Mewlon's finderscope to only perform an initial alignment on a EQ mount, I think it will be a minor annoyance.  If you are using Mewlon's finderscope for constant star hopping on an EQ mount, that could prove problematic no matter where the scope is facing.

 

Hope that helps.

Peter


Edited by Ruknight4ever, 24 February 2019 - 04:03 PM.


#24 Bill Barlow

Bill Barlow

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 10:46 AM

Thanks for the feedback.  My first SCT was a C6 with a straight thru finder.  The altaz mounts I use, the scope attaches to the right side so the finders are in the 1 o’clock position.  I won’t use a straight thru finder since it hurts my back to bend way over to look through it, especially when the scope is pointed toward the zenith.

 

Bill



#25 greenstars3

greenstars3

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 07:09 PM

Just received the 180 Mewlon today, cloudy naturally, set it on the kitchen table to let it warm up for about an hour, and could not resist. So I put a Baader diagonal in it and a TV 15 plossl and was looking at last years Russian olives and old leaves on a tree about 300 yards away, this scope is amazing. The hype is real.

I tried to leave the back doors open but the heat coming out of the house made the view shimmer, so I looked thru the double pane glass and still had a "stellar" view. 

 

The packing crate is ok to get the scope through shipping but needs replaced for any serious travel to the dark site of your choice.

I will mount this on an AVX as I do not do any imaging.

 

Robert 


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