Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Fantastic view of the Triesnecker and Hyginus Rilles last night!

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 davidmcgo

davidmcgo

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2919
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2004
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 14 March 2019 - 10:07 AM

Finally after several weeks of gloom, clouds, and rain here in normally sunny San Diego, I had a clear and reasonably stable atmosphere last night and was excited to get the Questar 3.5 out and spend some time with the Moon.

 

I had an amazingly good view of the Triesnecker Rilles and the Hyginus and Aridaeus Rills, along with the Alpine Valley with the "80-160x" eyepiece and barlow.

 

On my scope with the newer 50.5" fl optics and my barlow (which I verified at 1.98x using star timings and a 12mm Microguide Eyepiece), the 80-160 puts me at 98-196x.  196x was just right for the fine rilles around Triesnecker and the lighting was just about perfect.  The little hummock to the north of the carter showed up well, as did the little craterlet in the V of the eastern-most rilles.

 

The Alpine Valley was also really nice but the area of the Hadley Rille in the Appenines was still in deep shadow.

 

I also enjoyed nice views of Rigel, Castor, Algeiba, Eta Orionis, and Lambda Orionis to finish up with some doubles.  M42 was nice but a bit affected by moonlight.

 

I'm happy I was finally able to get out and enjoy a bit of observing!

 

Dave

 

 


  • Erik Bakker, Astrojensen, ianatcn and 5 others like this

#2 Mike Allen

Mike Allen

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 274
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2008

Posted 14 March 2019 - 11:33 AM

Really nice observing report.  Never tried my microguide eyepiece in the Q. Sounds interesting.



#3 coopman

coopman

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5472
  • Joined: 23 Apr 2006
  • Loc: South Louisiana

Posted 14 March 2019 - 11:38 AM

I had a fantastic view of clouds last night.  Glad that you could get out there.



#4 Kevin Barker

Kevin Barker

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 746
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Auckland, NZ

Posted 14 March 2019 - 02:15 PM

I was observing as well last night although from 36.7 degrees South.

Seeing was quite good once my Duplex Q 3.5 cooled.

I also split Eta Orionis and Rigel. Tried to see E and F in Orion's trapezium(no luck here ever). Tried to split Sirius also to no avail.

The Moon was really nice, quite low in our Northern Sky. 

 

Mosquitoes were quite bad and I beat a retreat after an hour or so. 



#5 RMay

RMay

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 54
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2019
  • Loc: NorCal

Posted 14 March 2019 - 09:37 PM

I have to agree that last night was pretty terrific, especially after probably five straight weeks of clouds (not that we have anything to complain about; we're well aware that most of the country is taking a beating right now).

 

Spent some time with the moon and took a few fair shots with an iPhone 6 close-coupled to a TV 19mm Wide Field lens. M42 was nice as well (only from the front yard, so we're hampered by streetlights). Also tried to split Sirius, and was using a TV 7.4mm Plossl, but even at ~175X I couldn't see it. Scope had not equalized and therefore also think I was asking a bit much of it.

 

Has anyone split Sirius with the Q 3.5?

 

Cheers,

 

Ron



#6 Loren Gibson

Loren Gibson

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 168
  • Joined: 04 Jun 2013
  • Loc: Northern Florida, USA

Posted 15 March 2019 - 05:35 AM

Yes, I've seen Sirius B in the Q 3.5 (and my 90 mm apochromat) and it isn't *always* difficult in these telescopes. The issues are:

 

1) Identification. It helps to know its current P.A. and separation, and for me it takes some thought to know, at a given magnification, how far away (say) 10 arc seconds from a star is in the field of view. The magnitude difference is profound, and knowing the two magnitudes as numbers isn't much help in preparing you what to expect! Sirius B is just an absolute, tiny little pinprick of light. After you've seen it once or twice, it becomes easier to perceive because you know what to look for. (A similar thing can be said about seeing Venus or Jupiter in daylight. Once you've experienced it, it becomes easier to identify.)

 

2) Magnification is less important, I find, than I had originally thought. I've seen it at multiple magnifications in the Questar. 50x-ish is difficult due to B's proximity to the irradiated A, but I've seen it. I find it to be much easier with my 16 mm Brandon, with or without the barlow. Going higher isn't necessary.

 

3) I tend to think that seeing is important. It's a hunch. It seems that the few times (out of the large handful of attempts) that I've failed to notice B, it was on nights with poor seeing. This also makes me think that it would help for the scope to be acclimated to ambient temperature.

 

I suggest looking at RIgel first. If you can see both components at a given magnification, its separation is roughly the same as Sirius (although Sirius is widening and has a bit more separation at this time) with less magnitude difference. It might give you a feel for where, in terms of separation, you should be expecting to see Sirius B, and maybe provides a hint of how "tiny" the faint component will look next to A. Rigel is a training aid for Sirius. wink.gif

 

Regarding the trapezium E & F. On good nights (again, seemed to be related to seeing more than anything) in south Florida, I could see them with my 90 mm apochromat, though F was not obvious. To me it was more difficult to see than Sirius B. I've trained the Q on the trap a few times, but could only see E (in good conditions). The extra light grasp of the refractor must have made the difference.

 

Loren


  • Erik Bakker, Kevin Barker, ianatcn and 1 other like this

#7 spereira

spereira

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 564
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Bedford, NH

Posted 15 March 2019 - 07:22 AM

I enjoyed your report very much, Dave!  Thanks for sharing.

 

I've been on a bit of travel lately, but that's been no matter because we continue with quite bad weather conditions up here in New Hampshire.  I am hoping for an early spring with a span of much more sun than clouds!

 

smp



#8 RMay

RMay

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 54
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2019
  • Loc: NorCal

Posted 15 March 2019 - 10:44 AM

Loren, thanks for the magnification information; it’s useful and greatly appreciated. If viewing remains clear this evening, I will give Sirius B another try, and will also go after Trapezium E and F.

Thanks again,

Ron
  • Loren Gibson likes this

#9 Optics Patent

Optics Patent

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1575
  • Joined: 30 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Dallas TX

Posted 15 March 2019 - 02:45 PM

Yes, I've seen Sirius B in the Q 3.5 (and my 90 mm apochromat) and it isn't *always* difficult in these telescopes. The issues are:

 

1) Identification. It helps to know its current P.A. and separation, and for me it takes some thought to know, at a given magnification, how far away (say) 10 arc seconds from a star is in the field of view. The magnitude difference is profound, and knowing the two magnitudes as numbers isn't much help in preparing you what to expect! Sirius B is just an absolute, tiny little pinprick of light. After you've seen it once or twice, it becomes easier to perceive because you know what to look for. (A similar thing can be said about seeing Venus or Jupiter in daylight. Once you've experienced it, it becomes easier to identify.)

For scale, the distance is like the smallest gap in the trapezium.  Look at not quite 4 o'clock (reversed in Questar).

 

I like the notion of how easy to see things can be after you believe you can see them.  It's related to the (perhaps exaggerated or even mythical) flattening of mile footrace times until the 4-minute mile was broken, then seemingly everyone could do it.


  • Loren Gibson likes this

#10 Kevin Barker

Kevin Barker

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 746
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Auckland, NZ

Posted 15 March 2019 - 04:25 PM

I will definitely target Sirius again. It had been a hot day and the radiation from bricks and concrete may have been a factor.

Sirius was overhead overnight. I should have observed. Never mind. I was glued to the TV watching the coverage re Christchurch and the terrorist attack. i grew up in Christchurch.

 

I have seen Sirius B in my 80 mm Zeiss, although it was only fleeting. I have also seen E and F in M42's Trapezium with this scope. It is an AS80/840.

 

My Q and the Zeiss are fairly similar at the eyepiece. A slight edge to the Zeiss in contrast and brightness.

 

IMG_0332.jpg


  • Erik Bakker likes this

#11 Kevin Barker

Kevin Barker

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 746
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Auckland, NZ

Posted 16 March 2019 - 04:31 AM

I was finally able to split Sirius this evening in the wee Q3.5. The scope from a warm house took about half an hour to cool but seeing was pretty steady up high. Was not able to see E or F in the Trapezium though. I hinted E but was not certain.

Rigel was nice. Stars were airy disc's above about 20 degrees.

 

I intended to hunt down doubles around Orion but cloud beat me inside ahead of Mosquitoes.


  • Erik Bakker and Loren Gibson like this

#12 Pragmatist

Pragmatist

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 288
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2018
  • Loc: Suffolk, UK 🇬🇧

Posted 16 March 2019 - 06:50 PM

Really great report. Winds here in the UK have been way too strong to observe in, even using a Tristand. 




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics