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Starry Night 8

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#1 stringbeans

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Posted 17 March 2019 - 06:09 PM

Anybody using this at all? I remember when 7 came out this forum seem to be buzzing with quite a few threads giving their thoughts and opinions on the newly revamped software as well helping the Devs get all the bugs sorted out and the reinstatement of certain features that were in the fantastic 6.3 version but omitted in 7.

 

Version 8 has been out for a while but I see nothing on here about it. I can't find any reviews and there isn't one single YouTube video uploaded from the Devs on their channel helping to promote it. Has SN fallen out of favour for different software to meet peoples needs?

 

 

 



#2 RandallK

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 11:28 AM

I had it but didn't like it. To me it was a graphics improved version 6 but nothing stunning. They were excellent in refunding me right away. I have now moved on to The SkyX Serious Astronomer...a bit more expensive, only limited to 2 machine installs, and a heck of a lot more for the extras. But I already used SGP and PHD2 for imaging and I do not have an observatory, so I don't need Dome Control either. If you tally up the extras it comes in around $500.00 Canadian. But the Astronomer version was $201.00 Canadian.

 

I really am enjoying The SkyX Serious Astronomer. If you have two monitors it really runs well. You can click on an object and its picture will appear. This is why two monitors are good to have. Creating an observation list is a snap and every well implemented. So, apart from cost, I am still glad I switched over.


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#3 Greyhaven

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 07:28 AM

You're right there seems to be a real lack of feed back on V8.... Could be that they are busy on their own site dealing with issues. They seem to prefer to help there not in this public forum. Lessons learned from V7.

Grey


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#4 dongallo

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 06:25 AM

Starry Night 8 is a major huge, big time improvement over Starry Night 7 for 2 reasons.

 

The engine, the heart and soul, the absolute most important thing about astroware is the deepsky database. top 10 things to look at when choosing astronomy software, 1 through 8 is the deepsky database. It's that important. It needs to be large, plotting every single last thing without exception visible in binoculars and 2" to 20" scopes. It needs to be accurate with good info to help you plan observing sessions. It also needs to be crossed indexed. The deepsky database of Starry Night 7 was a haphazard mess of text files thrown in without a *&^% given that sucked major *&^. Starry Night 8 has made a major overhaul to its deepsky database. It is now cross indexed, and plots most everything visible in amateur equipment. The info is a little better though not as good at SkySafari, Skytools, and others. Double star info is poor. Nonetheless, the deepsky database has improved so much I now recommend it as a consideration as a serious tool at the telescope.

Reason two: Modern computing consist of data syncing in real time from device to device. Gone are the days when we only had one desktop. Now we have smartphones. When you edit an Excel file on your laptop, it syncs in real time to your phone, so you can view and make changes on your phone. You find a great recipe on your laptop, copy it to Onenote, go down stairs, pull it up on your phone and cook. That is 21st century computing. Starry Night along with the mobile app SkySafari are the only astroware that is modern. Create an observing list in Starry Night and pull  it up on your phone when you are at your telescope. Create a log entry on your phone and view it in Starry Night the next morning. Starry Night and SkySafari syncs in real time, observing sessions, equipment, logs, locations, and observing list. That is mega huge.

Because of these 2 major ground breaking, major huge improvements, I now use Starry Night over Skytools and TheSky.   



#5 Ron359

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 02:50 PM

Anybody using this at all? I remember when 7 came out this forum seem to be buzzing with quite a few threads giving their thoughts and opinions on the newly revamped software as well helping the Devs get all the bugs sorted out and the reinstatement of certain features that were in the fantastic 6.3 version but omitted in 7.

 

Version 8 has been out for a while but I see nothing on here about it. I can't find any reviews and there isn't one single YouTube video uploaded from the Devs on their channel helping to promote it. Has SN fallen out of favour for different software to meet peoples needs?

No reviews SNP8 ?  What, you missed all these?  

 

https://www.cloudyni...ght-8-released/

 

https://www.cloudyni...ry-night-pro-8/

 

I got my money back soon after trying it.  

 

Apparently even SC considers it beta since it still doesn't come up on their products page.   https://simulationcu...-astronomy.html

 

Maybe some day they'll figure it out. Or maybe its just a 'ploy' to finally dump SN and only offer Sky Safari.  


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#6 Steve Cox

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 04:31 PM

Starry Night 8 is a major huge, big time improvement over Starry Night 7 for 2 reasons.

 

The engine, the heart and soul, the absolute most important thing about astroware is the deepsky database. top 10 things to look at when choosing astronomy software, 1 through 8 is the deepsky database. It's that important. It needs to be large, plotting every single last thing without exception visible in binoculars and 2" to 20" scopes. It needs to be accurate with good info to help you plan observing sessions. It also needs to be crossed indexed. The deepsky database of Starry Night 7 was a haphazard mess of text files thrown in without a *&^% given that sucked major *&^. Starry Night 8 has made a major overhaul to its deepsky database. It is now cross indexed, and plots most everything visible in amateur equipment. The info is a little better though not as good at SkySafari, Skytools, and others. Double star info is poor. Nonetheless, the deepsky database has improved so much I now recommend it as a consideration as a serious tool at the telescope.

Reason two: Modern computing consist of data syncing in real time from device to device. Gone are the days when we only had one desktop. Now we have smartphones. When you edit an Excel file on your laptop, it syncs in real time to your phone, so you can view and make changes on your phone. You find a great recipe on your laptop, copy it to Onenote, go down stairs, pull it up on your phone and cook. That is 21st century computing. Starry Night along with the mobile app SkySafari are the only astroware that is modern. Create an observing list in Starry Night and pull  it up on your phone when you are at your telescope. Create a log entry on your phone and view it in Starry Night the next morning. Starry Night and SkySafari syncs in real time, observing sessions, equipment, logs, locations, and observing list. That is mega huge.

Because of these 2 major ground breaking, major huge improvements, I now use Starry Night over Skytools and TheSky.   

I really want(ed) to agree with this.  Unfortunately, your Reason Two is where it fell way short on promise and still doesn't work for me, and why I asked for a refund.  As I've mentioned in another thread, as an SNPP8 beta tester, I was surprised when the product was released with none of the issues discovered during beta fixed (at least none I discovered and let them know).  I was quite put off finding out I had bought the full product to find out it was still beta for all practical purposes, without any fixes applied, and to my knowledge still aren't.

 

Most of the issues are directly related to shared files.  Between LiveSky and SkySafari, there is 100% sharing of databases, so 100% correct transfer of observing lists and logs.  Not so for Starry Night 8.  It's still using its own database for many items such as stellar database, comets, meteor showers and others.  What this means is observing lists don't always fully sync, and if not, then observing logs are not transferred or are unable to be read even though they report as present.  To date, reading the Sim Curr Community Support forums since I was refunded for the product, it doesn't sound like this has still been fixed.  Also broken, still to my knowledge is the pointer record for the external data (AllSky Image, Horizons, Exoplanet Planetary Images, etc).  The files are reported as being installed and run from one folder, but the pointer is incorrect, which means unless you're aware of the issue and manually rename the folder (in the hidden ProgramData directory) you're having to constantly stream the data.  And yes there are still people without fast internet, or those like me who do not wish to constantly tie up their pipe streaming data if it's available locally, as it slows down the entire program.

 

All this said, I really do have high hopes that Simulation Curriculum will get all the known issues fixed and a stable version 8 releases, and sooner than later, so they don't scramble with a lot of stuff hanging when SN9 is released one day.  I really want to like the product and hope it will one day meet my needs of full integration between my desktop and SkySafari/LiveSky; sadly at present it still falls way short.

 

edit - if DSO's and solar system objects (aside from those I mentioned above) are mostly all you're going to observe then SN8 is likely going to be an excellent product for you.  I'm not disagreeing with you dongallo, I'm just letting the OP know it all depends on their needs and how they plan to use the product as to whether it's an excellent product or if it'll come up short.


Edited by Steve Cox, 22 March 2019 - 05:20 PM.

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#7 stringbeans

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 02:01 AM

Apparently even SC considers it beta since it still doesn't come up on their products page.   https://simulationcu...-astronomy.html

 

Maybe some day they'll figure it out. Or maybe its just a 'ploy' to finally dump SN and only offer Sky Safari.  

It's on their Home Page.

 

https://starrynight....l-software.html



#8 Ron359

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 11:00 AM

It's on their Home Page.

 

https://starrynight....l-software.html

which makes even less sense...  if you don't know there is a SN8 you won't be looking for it... The maker, SC, doesn't want people to find it on their Products page?    



#9 rmollise

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Posted 25 March 2019 - 01:30 PM

I liked 6...it was buggy, but I liked it. 7 was more buggy. I am using the company's other program, SkySafari and am quite happy with that.



#10 Sky_LO

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Posted 07 September 2019 - 02:52 PM

How do you find the NGC designations in SN8 ? 

 

Some NGC are showing....others have been converted to LBN (brigh nebula) LDN (dark nebula) and FSR (open cluster) 

designations.

 

My telescope control does not show LBN, LDN, and FSR

so for me SN8 is less functional until I can figure out how to see the NGC or IC designation for these "converted" objects.

 

FYI - My version was free with a telescope    

 

-LoLo 



#11 dongallo

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Posted 07 September 2019 - 03:28 PM

How do you find the NGC designations in SN8 ? 

 

Some NGC are showing....others have been converted to LBN (brigh nebula) LDN (dark nebula) and FSR (open cluster) 

designations.

 

My telescope control does not show LBN, LDN, and FSR

so for me SN8 is less functional until I can figure out how to see the NGC or IC designation for these "converted" objects.

 

FYI - My version was free with a telescope    

 

-LoLo 

Starry Night 8 has all 13,000 NGC/IC objects and all are labeled as NGC and IC. LBN, LDN. FSR, Collinder, melottle, king, Do, Barnard, and others are additional objects not part of the NGC/IC catalogs. There is nothing to convert. These additional objects are very visible in amateur telescopes and even in binoculars for some. Any good astronomy program plots these additional objects. In fact, never buy astronomy software that doesn't.

 

To find an ngc object just type ngc and it number in the search bar and it will find it lightening fast.



#12 Sky_LO

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Posted 07 September 2019 - 06:00 PM

Ok so these are extra objects, got it TY 



#13 Sky_LO

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 12:24 PM

I think I figured out my issue. 

The free edition that came with my SE6 is missing all of the filters for object type and for

catalog  !!!  

 

There is ONLY a deep space object toggle.  I either get them ALL or none.   

Not so good.  

 

Sounds like objects are upgraded.... but not so much if you can't screen them 

 

-Lauren   




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