Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

DSO observations from a light polluted sky.

beginner dob dso observing reflector
  • Please log in to reply
56 replies to this topic

#51 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 78370
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 06 May 2019 - 01:22 PM

NGC-1502 or Jolly Roger Cluster, lies in Camelopardalis and has a mag. of 6,9.

The Jolly Roger Cluster is another one of the nicknames that Stephen O'Meara coined simply to fit the title of his book Deep-Sky Companions: Hidden Treasures.

 

https://books.google... omeara&f=false

Dave Mitsky


  • alexantos likes this

#52 REC

REC

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11143
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2010
  • Loc: NC

Posted 06 May 2019 - 02:51 PM

Thanks REC,

 

I always try to replicate, as close as I can, what I see.

Bare in mind that seeing conditions vary all the time, so I try to choose the best observation, that I've had so far, of a determined object.

Galaxies are the hardest to represent because they are so dim, so sometimes to see them in sketches, you have to use averted vision, or check the brightness/contrast on your monitor.

 

 

 

Thanks for concerning, but I've already done that, as you can see in here.

The next to build is a Dew Shield, when I have the time...

 

Take care.

 

Alexandre

Very nice solution! Nice looking scope too.


  • alexantos likes this

#53 alexantos

alexantos

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Estoril, PT (White Zone)

Posted 06 May 2019 - 06:06 PM


I've said this I think before, but again.  It seems perhaps ironic, but many people who have some sort of scope will also buy RV's and other camping and fishing gear and on a weekend or vacation head for say a state park, NP, or lake and swim, go boating, fishing, spend a bunch of money at Bass Pro Shoppe or Cabelas or Dick's (put it all on plastic and make payments) and go to places which have significantly darker skies than their light polluted backyard or balcony...But then say they cannot, or will not, or refuse to use their scope unless they can do it in their LP back yard, or hang it out of some high rise apartment, or attend some organized star party.  Some will say, "but I don't like the idea of going out alone in the dark to some remote rural dark sky place."  But they will turn around, pack the family, kids, and amigos and all head for the lake for the weekend or a vacation. I can't figure why they don't include doing at least some dark sky observing in with this?  I've seen lots of cat fisherman set their poles out and sit on the lake or river bank all night alone. It this so much different than astronomy? Is there some unwritten commandment somewhere that says, "Thou shalt not explore the night sky unless it is from you backyard, or balcony, or driveway, or a star party?"  Even the late J Dobson might start out showing folks the wonders of the sky from the streets of the left coast SF, but he also took it to terrific places like Crater Lake, Or.    I don't get it: there must me some reason for this inconsistency; I guess I just don't get it?  You're not scared of the dark or say aliens are you?  When I started out dark sky observing I packed a gun which I would load upon arrival at the dss.  But as I did more dark sky observing I just carried a hand held tear gas spray used by utility workers called "Bad Dog."  I don't think it legal any more in this PC world we live in.  So, I just carry regular pepper spay.  Bass Pro has some "Bear Stopper".  It will powerful enough to stop the worst bad guy, but I think it's a bit over priced.   Well, that's all for now.  I'll just say what I always say: "it's your hobby, so do it the way you want."

 

Cool down Philler,

 

I bought my telescope only three months ago.

And of course I have made plans for some getaways to dark places.

I'm not afraid of the dark, and I've met some aliens once.

My country is very peaceful and secure. No need for weaponry.

 

Take care,

 

Alexandre


  • ziridava likes this

#54 alexantos

alexantos

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Estoril, PT (White Zone)

Posted 06 May 2019 - 08:17 PM

Planetary Nebulas M-97 and NGC 2392.

 

Having tried many times to watch Nebulas and, aside from M42, I was getting somehow frustrated all the time for not seeing no traces at all.

By the end of April I've pointed my telescope to these two objects, having not any expectations of perceiving them.

But I was wrong.

 

M-97 is located in the Ursa Major constellation and has a 9,9 magnitude. Very hard to see but it can be seen using averted vision. I used the asterisms to locate the exact spot and then took my time. Then a fuzzy ball started to detach against the (bright) sky.

 

NGC 2392 (C-39), the Eskimo Nebula may be mistaken for a star at 48x, but if you look closer it's not. Because of its small size of only 48 arcsec, you need to use higher magnifications to see it better. It has a mag. of 10,1, it is located in Gemini and belongs to the Herschel 400 catalogue.

 

 

gallery_304439_10942_16412.jpg

 

 

gallery_304439_10942_21336.jpg


Edited by alexantos, 06 May 2019 - 08:23 PM.

  • ziridava likes this

#55 alexantos

alexantos

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Estoril, PT (White Zone)

Posted 08 May 2019 - 07:02 PM

Globular Clusters M-5, M-68 and NGC-4147.

 

I find very hard to resolve stars in Globular Clusters. The ones that I saw before looked like faint balls of light, like diffuse Silkworm Cocoons. Although they could be detected and seen fairly easy, like M3 or M53, I could not resolve any individual stars on them, even with higher magnifications. And then I looked at M5...

 

M5, the Rose Cluster mag 5,95, is located in Serpens. It's very easy to find because it lays very close to the bright star 5 Serpentis. I also had to put the star out of eyepiece's sight because it was dazzling me. I then saw distinct individual small stars around the core, and with higher magnification I could resolve them. Very beautiful cluster.

 

M68 looks faint maybe because of his size, about half of M5, and his low brightness. Also it was low in the sky, at about 23°, which doesn't help at all. In spite of this It can be easily seen, although I wasn't able to resolve any stars on it. It's in Hydra with a mag. of 9,67.

 

NGC 4147 is a small cluster. During last April, I tried to see this cluster with no results at all. Finally last 2nd of May I had a glimpse of it, and I saw a very dim glow, like a fuzzy galactic core. I tried higher magnification with no results. It was best seen, only averted, at 48x. It lays in Coma Berenices and has a mag. of 10,74.

 

 

gallery_304439_10942_1184.jpg

 

gallery_304439_10942_30557.jpg

 

gallery_304439_10942_17517.jpg


Edited by alexantos, 08 May 2019 - 07:03 PM.


#56 alexantos

alexantos

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Estoril, PT (White Zone)

Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:40 PM

Open Star Clusters M16, M20 & M21, M23 and M25.

 

About a month ago, very late at night, I had a very first glimpse at the Sagittarius/Serpens zone.

I was able to see, in a exceptional white zone night, this Star Clusters. That region of the sky is truly marvelous, even when observing under light polluted skies.

 

M16, in Serpens, is known as the Eagle Nebula. It is also known for holding one of the most famous regions in the sky, the Pillars of Creation. Unfortunately I couldn't see the nebula, although averted I saw some very faint nebulosity. Nevertheless, the young Star Cluster is a very beautiful sight. It has a mag. of 6.

 

M20 and M21, mag 6,3 and 6,5 in Sagittarius, can be seen together in the eyepiece's field of view.

M20, the Trifid Nebula, located in the upper part, is an H-II region. I couldn't see traces of the nebula, but with a H-II filter probably I would.

M21, in the low part, is a star rich Open Cluster, very distinctive and very bright.

An asterism, named Webb's Cross, lies between these two objects.

 

M23, also in Sagittarius has a mag. of 5,5. Very beautiful Cluster.The number of stars is estimated between 169 up to 414.

 

M25, the brightest of this objects with a mag. of 4,6, can be seen with binos even in poor conditions like mine. It has 601 stars. It lies in Sagittarius. According to Wikipedia, "The cluster is located near some obscuring features, with a dark lane passing near the center.[3]"

 

 

gallery_304439_10942_21576.jpg

 

gallery_304439_10942_36205.jpg

 

gallery_304439_10942_31149.jpg

 

gallery_304439_10942_19718.jpg



#57 TiSaph

TiSaph

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 418
  • Joined: 24 Jan 2017

Posted 12 June 2019 - 03:18 PM

I could only wish that Sagittarius and Scorpio were up for longer and much higher ....


  • jcj380 and alexantos like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: beginner, dob, dso, observing, reflector



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics