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The Horror!

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#1 Araguaia

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 08:56 AM

I was walking the dog yesterday afternoon, gazing at the Moon.  As usual when near full, it is at the opposite side of the ecliptic to the Sun.

 

Thinking about its path around the ecliptic, suddenly it hit me: observers in temperate zones have the full Moon rising earlier and setting later in winter, when it higher in the sky for them!

 

This morning I got up for observing after the Moon set.  It set at 3:50 AM, but at 4:00 AM its glow was still annoying me as I observed M83.  Still, I had an hour of full darkness, enough to observe 3 DSOs and glance at a few more. Near the equator, every lunar month we have 9 days when you can observe in the evening without it, 9 days when you can observe in the morning without it, two days each when you can observe for less than an hour or two before it rises, and only 5-6 days that are a total loss.  But temperate observers have the Moon up for a lot longer, precisely in the season when nights are longest... and in the summer, when the Moon is lower,  they have to deal with long days and endless twilight...

 

No wonder all the snowbirds love their fracs so much...

 


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#2 csrlice12

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:03 AM

Ask yourself...if Mars was as close to the Earth as the moon, would you still feel that way.  Be sure to consider that the Earth/moon is really a double planet...and we've found few of those elsewhere.  


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#3 Gipht

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:11 AM

The moon has triggered many a romantic evening.  The moon sloshes our oceans creating tidal zones.   The moon has probably saved the planet from horrific asteroid impacts. The moon brightens our  paths in the dark.    Hmmm, maybe I can start imaging again in about a weekgrin.gif.


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#4 Araguaia

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:12 AM

Oh, I love the Moon.  It must be the object I observe the most - not least because it is often the only object worth observing as it washes out the sky with its glow - only Venus, Jupiter, and Mars survive unfaded.  But it's nice to get it out of the way once in a while so you can observe something else.


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#5 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:44 AM

"the Earth/moon is really a double planet"

 

 Well, almost but not quite. Currently, the center of mass of this system resides within the Earth.


Edited by Richard O'Neill, 18 March 2019 - 09:45 AM.


#6 Araguaia

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:01 AM

 Currently, the center of mass of this system resides within the Earth.

 

Just wait.


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#7 InkDark

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:23 AM

 

 

Thinking about its path around the ecliptic, suddenly it hit me: observers in temperate zones have the full Moon rising earlier and setting later in winter, when it higher in the sky for them!

 

 

The worst thing about the ecliptic and the current position of planets in the solar system is that Jupiter and Saturn are visible only around summer months when they never get high in the sky for us in the North. I miss observing the big guys.

 

Yet another reason why I like to observe during winter months.

 

So yes there are some down sides to be in the Northen hemisphere, but at least we don't hang with our heads up side down...


Edited by InkDark, 18 March 2019 - 10:24 AM.

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#8 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:52 AM

"Just wait."

 

 I ain't got that much time. flowerred.gif



#9 aeajr

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:58 AM

You play the hand you are dealt.  You can still win!

 

I enjoy it all!  :D


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#10 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 12:11 AM

The Moon is not really a moon, it is an artificial construct built by an alien intelligence and dragged here by powerful spacecraft approx. 10,000 years ago. And, it is Hollow!

 

Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go out and catch a glimpse of the planet "Nibiru" before I go to evening services at my local "Church of the Flat-earthers". Tonight will be extra special because we are finally going to set-up and use our 30-metre psychic telescope. I heard a rumour that one of the members has an honest-to-god, real, actual, bona-fide Sasquatch locked up in his basement...sshhh, don't tell anyone!

 

Insanely yours, RalphMeisterTigerMan.



#11 Astroman007

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 12:26 AM

Ask yourself...if Mars was as close to the Earth as the moon, would you still feel that way.  Be sure to consider that the Earth/moon is really a double planet...and we've found few of those elsewhere.  

We may even reside within a double solar system.



#12 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 12:34 AM

In the summer the full moon at my latitude (61°N) barely rises 7° or so just for a few hours, just like the sun does in winter. In winter the full moon is up for almost 20 hrs, just like the sun in summer. This last full moon rose and set along the suns path, roughly 12 hrs.
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