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Solar EAA?

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#1 descott12

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 08:35 PM

EAA is not just for DSO's.  Here are a few shots from yesterday using a Lunt 50HTa solar scope and an ASI 178 MM camera.

 

Solar imaging is like planetary imaging. There are no background stars so you can't live stack. All of the beautiful solar images you may have seen are the result of alot of post-processing (stacking, sharpening, etc) but you can still see some cool stuff live with EAA.

 

As you can see, I have my Lunt scope piggybacked on my Evo 8. This way I can use the Evo's tracking capabilities and remote control. The balance is way off but I usually don't track for long so hopefully I am not putting too much stress on the motors...

One image is of some surface detail and the other is of a few small prominences (small but actually as big as the earth!).  The exposure required to capture each is markedly different so they are usually captured separately and them combined later in post-processing.

 

The exposures used were 0.86 ms for the surface shot and 31 ms for the prominences. Gain 79. Single frame live screen capture in Sharp Cap.

 

I hope you enjoy. The sun is really interesting in that is its very dynamic. Even in a slow solar period, there is always something to see in the H-alpha band. And it changes daily or even more frequently.

 

OBLIGATORY WARNING - DO  NOT LOOK AT THE SUN. DO NOT POINT YOUR SCOPE AT THE SUN UNLESS YOU HAVE THE CORRECT EQUIPMENT AND FILTERS

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#2 t_image

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 03:21 PM

Solar EAA?

 

Well yes, but the CN EAA community is mostly DSO slanted.

I find my EAA Solar activities more a fit in the Solar Observing and Imaging section of CN.

 

EAA Solar gives opportunities for this:

https://www.cloudyni...transit-of-sun/

 

and this:

grow prom

Cropped, animated from 4K video 30fps recorded out of Sony a7s, Lunt 100LS Solarscope.

Animation speed up. Regular speed impressive, but shortened for sake of presentation.  Happened while I awaited an ISS Solar transit...

 

Also this:

https://www.youtube....zIIMp_ECVWhrgIg

 

 

Not sure if it is the video tools I have access to or the camera or the scope,

but I have decent success capturing disk edge proms along with surface detail simultaneously.

I think it is mostly a dynamic range issue that some video live-color-correction tools can offer if dialed in properly....

 

Cheers!


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#3 descott12

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 04:05 PM

very cool

#4 jwestervelt

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Posted 24 March 2019 - 02:59 AM

My first guess is that the object is a satellite, but I did the math.  Even if it were as low as 200km from the observer, the speed of the object would be just north of 12km/s, which is considerably higher than the ~7.8km/s speed for a circular orbit at that height.  

My best guess is that it is a 3' weather balloon which would put it at about 11 miles from the observer and moving at about 22mph.  If it were an 8' weather balloon, it would be about 29 miles out and moving at 60mph.



#5 t_image

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Posted 24 March 2019 - 08:10 PM

My first guess is that the object is a satellite, but I did the math.  Even if it were as low as 200km from the observer, the speed of the object would be just north of 12km/s, which is considerably higher than the ~7.8km/s speed for a circular orbit at that height.  

My best guess is that it is a 3' weather balloon which would put it at about 11 miles from the observer and moving at about 22mph.  If it were an 8' weather balloon, it would be about 29 miles out and moving at 60mph.

Yeah, the original 4K video gives a tad more detail where you can see the balloon warp as it floats by...I would think a weather balloon might have a tethered payload...

I figure it is one of those 3" foil party balloons that a child lost hold of a few bits away.....

Talking to a veteran airline pilot-he says he has seen those toy balloons up there floating around--....

Also excepting Tiangong 2 (now de-orbited) and the ISS(60 arc seconds @ highest zenith pass),

it's pretty unreasonable to resolve any orbiting satellite which usually have an angular diameter of 1 arc seconds at most. Most seeing opportunities don't offer that level even if one's optics allow.....

I have another silhouette capture of a larger round balloon (another day) that misses the Sun but is illuminated by the fringe h-a disk glow.... Depending on one's terrestrial situation, one is bound to capture particular things transiting!



#6 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 29 March 2019 - 06:05 PM

By the way... you can use mono cameras in Firecapture and with the display settings give your live image a nice golden yellow color.
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#7 Larry Mc

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Posted 01 April 2019 - 09:20 PM

Hi Dave,

 

I use to be more into doing solar videoastronomy with my old Stellacam-EX and other analog cameras, using white-light, PST Ha & CAK, and a Daystar .6A T-Scanner.  Here's my solar website, http://www.stellar-j...olar/Bwwso4.htm   , though i haven't added anything new in the past couple of years.

 

Once I upgraded to a cooled Stellacam-3 camera and learned how to achieve an accurate polar align in the field,,,, I've gone to the dark side (deep-sky objects).  LOL

 

Here's a picture of my solar setup inside my observatory:

   Celestron 8" Ultima SCT (f10) with Daystar .6A T-Scanner Ha filter & Stellacam-EX 1/2" CCD 600 TV lines analog camera
   Piggybacked Coronado PST & Coronado PST CaK with 'GSN Video' Sony Super HAD B&W security CCTV cameras 1/3" CCD 600 TV lines
   Piggybacked 80mm RFT with a Baader Solar Film filter (white-light) for visual.

 

Though recently, I've been thinking about getting back into solar video-observing. Probably after I finish-up my current Herschel-2500 video-capture project.

 

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#8 descott12

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Posted 01 April 2019 - 09:49 PM

Wow! That is quite a setup!




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