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Do You Find the Reticles of a Reflex Gunsight Too Bright?

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#1 Rexcat

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 08:44 PM

Hi All,

 

I have found that the Reflex Gunsight makes quite a nice zero power finder for my scope. They are reasonably priced, if you go to a sporting goods outlet and stay away from an astronomy store, light weight, and easy to adjust with the adjusting screws having click stops. Once aligned they maintain alignment well too.

_MG_0334.jpg

 

The one thing I found that I really didn’t care for with them is the brightness of the target projected on the glass. Being designed for day light use, even the dimmest level is too bright. I lose Sirius in the glare of the reticle when doing a star alignment. I had heard somewhere that putting a neutral density filter over where the reticle beam is emitted will do the trick and dim things down. Not wanting to try to cut a small rectangle of glass I looked for a plastic filter instead.

 

_MG_0333.jpg
What I found though was even better. In a search of eBay, I came across a thin self-adhesive ND filter material meant to be used on GoPro cameras. This stuff works great! Easy to cut the small .25 x .31 rectangle and with the help of a tweezers, it was no problem attaching it to the glass window. To reduce the light enough I found that a double layer of the ND 8 worked fine.

 

_MG_0332.jpg

Just used the sight tonight for the first time since applying the filter and I found the brightness of the target perfect for aligning. Here is the link to the listing on eBay:

 

https://www.ebay.com...353.m2749.l2649

 

 

Clear Skies,

Paul


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#2 homerdt

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:18 PM

Hi All,

 

I have found that the Reflex Gunsight makes quite a nice zero power finder for my scope. They are reasonably priced, if you go to a sporting goods outlet and stay away from an astronomy store, light weight, and easy to adjust with the adjusting screws having click stops. Once aligned they maintain alignment well too.

attachicon.gif _MG_0334.jpg

 

The one thing I found that I really didn’t care for with them is the brightness of the target projected on the glass. Being designed for day light use, even the dimmest level is too bright. I lose Sirius in the glare of the reticle when doing a star alignment. I had heard somewhere that putting a neutral density filter over where the reticle beam is emitted will do the trick and dim things down. Not wanting to try to cut a small rectangle of glass I looked for a plastic filter instead.

 

attachicon.gif _MG_0333.jpg
What I found though was even better. In a search of eBay, I came across a thin self-adhesive ND filter material meant to be used on GoPro cameras. This stuff works great! Easy to cut the small .25 x .31 rectangle and with the help of a tweezers, it was no problem attaching it to the glass window. To reduce the light enough I found that a double layer of the ND 8 worked fine.

 

attachicon.gif _MG_0332.jpg

Just used the sight tonight for the first time since applying the filter and I found the brightness of the target perfect for aligning. Here is the link to the listing on eBay:

 

https://www.ebay.com...353.m2749.l2649

 

 

Clear Skies,

Paul

Thanks for the info, I've got one (not the same brand) but too bright to use as is. I'm gonna try this.


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#3 Astrolite

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:28 PM

Your recommendation then is just get the ND8 and not bother with the ND4?



#4 Eric H

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:45 PM

Awesome! Thanks for the tip! Will have to give it a try.



#5 Rexcat

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:33 PM

Your recommendation then is just get the ND8 and not bother with the ND4?

Yes, if you can. You would have to find a different source since the listing I bought from sold both together.



#6 jcj380

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 07:32 AM

Red tail light repair tape.



#7 OldManSky

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:07 AM

I used a piece of exposed color negative film, thanks to a tip from another thread here.


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#8 Rexcat

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:31 AM

Red tail light repair tape.

I've tried red plastic filter first, the red light passed right through without dimming.



#9 Pauls72

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 08:48 AM

I used a piece of exposed color negative film, thanks to a tip from another thread here.

This works great!


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#10 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 10:58 AM

Indeed, trying to filter red light with a red filter is very likely to be a fruitless endeavor! ;) After all, a red filter is usually *designed* to pass as much red light as possible. Unless the red filter has a very sharp cut-off and passes light *more deeply red* than the red LED's emission.

 

A green filter would be better, if no neutral filter is to hand.



#11 DennisK

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 04:51 PM

I use a Browning Buckmark sight, it has a brightness adjustment on it, I turn it down to the lowest level, works fine for me.



#12 RandallK

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 06:24 PM

Is this why I see 2 or 3 stars when there should be only 1? 

 

(I also wear progressive tri-focals) but I think they used to work with the reflex sight. Having a very hard time with it now. Due to my careful alignment procedure I seldom find it necessary but when my scopes out of whack I really depend on the reflex finder.



#13 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 08:21 PM

I use a Browning Buckmark sight, it has a brightness adjustment on it, I turn it down to the lowest level, works fine for me.

Can you turn it down so you can't see it under dark skies? The Browning Buckmark appears to be another reticule sight from the same factory as Rexcat's.

 

In my experience, they are too bright for dark skies. The Telrad can be turned down so it cannot be seen.. that's how they ought to be. Then it can be turned up to it's barely visible.

 

Jon



#14 DennisK

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 05:44 AM

Can you turn it down so you can't see it under dark skies? The Browning Buckmark appears to be another reticule sight from the same factory as Rexcat's.

 

In my experience, they are too bright for dark skies. The Telrad can be turned down so it cannot be seen.. that's how they ought to be. Then it can be turned up to it's barely visible.

 

Jon

I've never had the opportunity to use it under REALLY dark skies.  From my home (Northeast Ohio, suburb of Cleveland, lot of light pollution) it works fine.  I've used it when we've gone camping in places with darker skies but still with some light pollution and it was acceptable.  I also have a Televue Starbeam finder, it gets VERY dim but then it cost a LOT MORE than the Buckmark.


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