Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Caught something weird in a 3 sec frame and focus sub...

  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 19 March 2019 - 12:54 AM

Can you guys please tell me what i am looking at? Went through half the frame of an asi071mc pro in 3 seconds. Thanks

Had to practically destroy it to get to 500kb.

Attached Thumbnails

  • ufo.jpg

Edited by AntMan1, 19 March 2019 - 12:55 AM.


#2 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2354
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:00 AM

Don't see anything but it was likely a satellite or meteor.



#3 msl615

msl615

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 615
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2015
  • Loc: Fairbanks, Alaska

Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:22 AM

HI....I enhanced your image to bring out the contrast to be able to see it better. 

 

I think 3 secs is too long to be a meteor....I am thinking a dim satellite?

 

Mike

Attached Thumbnails

  • streak enhanced.jpg

  • AntMan1 and Mark Bailey like this

#4 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2354
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:24 AM

Thanks - What's the blue ball at the lower end?

 

EDIT - Its not like any satellite I have seen.  Somebody playing with a laser pointer?


Edited by Jim Waters, 19 March 2019 - 01:26 AM.


#5 JoeInMN

JoeInMN

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 176
  • Joined: 30 Oct 2015
  • Loc: Minneapolis, MN, USA

Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:29 AM

Did this (very) quick'n'dirty in GIMP just to bring out what I think this is about; it's visible once you know what to look for:

 

antman1_something_weird.jpg

 

Edit: Too slow, heh... Well I'll leave it up anyway.


Edited by JoeInMN, 19 March 2019 - 01:30 AM.

  • AntMan1 likes this

#6 rekokich

rekokich

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 751
  • Joined: 14 Sep 2014
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 19 March 2019 - 03:12 AM

The END of a meteor trail, exploding high in the atmosphere.

 

v7.jpg


  • AntMan1, psandelle, Mark Bailey and 1 other like this

#7 RalphMeisterTigerMan

RalphMeisterTigerMan

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 808
  • Joined: 01 Nov 2016

Posted 19 March 2019 - 05:18 AM

Oh, thank-god! The mothership has finally returned to pick me up. They took their sweet time, 50 years on the miserable rock...can't wait to get back home.

Are the rest of you from section Z9 all packed and ready to go..good. We'll meet at the designated staging area...think we should warn the inhabitants of this planet about the Asteroid headed...what do mean Humans can read this!

 

Ah, never mind! Clear skies and happy trails....hope I get out before the black helicopters show up!

 

LOL! April fools day...okay, so I'm a little early.

 

But seriously, really cool pic!

RalphMeisterTigerMan


  • AntMan1, psandelle, nemo129 and 2 others like this

#8 Dan Crowson

Dan Crowson

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2116
  • Joined: 08 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Dardenne Prairie, MO

Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:20 AM

This could also be a plane. The exposure started or stopped right as one of the lights on it flashed.
 
Dan


  • AntMan1 likes this

#9 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2354
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:42 AM

No running lights.



#10 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:21 PM

Weird weird photo... what is the chance of an meteorite exploding? Then again i seen one in the adk mountains years ago...  coolest thing i have ever seen.


  • mumbles likes this

#11 Dan Crowson

Dan Crowson

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2116
  • Joined: 08 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Dardenne Prairie, MO

Posted 19 March 2019 - 01:58 PM

No running lights.

If you're talking about my comment above, this was a 3 second exposure so I doubt there would be more than one light flash.

Dan



#12 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 19 March 2019 - 05:19 PM

If you're talking about my comment above, this was a 3 second exposure so I doubt there would be more than one light flash.

Dan

As far as i remember all airplane navigation lights "red and green" are on all the time.



#13 Dan Crowson

Dan Crowson

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2116
  • Joined: 08 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Dardenne Prairie, MO

Posted 19 March 2019 - 05:35 PM

I get flashing lights at times in my exposures (yielding 'new' stars). I wouldn't assume the blue would completely blank out the lights if that is where you're going.

Dan



#14 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 19 March 2019 - 05:51 PM

I get flashing lights at times in my exposures (yielding 'new' stars). I wouldn't assume the blue would completely blank out the lights if that is where you're going.

Dan

planes have both strobing and constant lighting. 

 

https://en.wikipedia...avigation_light


Edited by AntMan1, 19 March 2019 - 09:34 PM.


#15 Dan Crowson

Dan Crowson

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2116
  • Joined: 08 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Dardenne Prairie, MO

Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:28 PM

planes have both strobing and constant lighting. 
 
https://en.wikipedia...avigation_light

Sorry, I'm just missing what you're trying to say. I've seen similar results in my images from planes and helicopters. That's really all I'm trying to say. I tend to find that about 99% of the times these things are more man-made than meteors and the like.

Dan



#16 rekokich

rekokich

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 751
  • Joined: 14 Sep 2014
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 03 April 2019 - 01:56 PM

antman1,

 

Here is your image processed with a bit more care. It is a unique photo indeed!

 

meteor 6.jpg


  • mumbles and Earthbound1 like this

#17 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 03 April 2019 - 02:28 PM

antman1,

 

Here is your image processed with a bit more care. It is a unique photo indeed!

 

attachicon.gif meteor 6.jpg

Wow just wow! are you telling me all that detail was in that original photo? I am convinced it was some type of space junk or a rock burning up in the atmosphere now. Is there any agency that could help tell us what it is? What is your opinion?

 

link to original fit 

 

https://drive.google...1_ePHGJWqVVOup6

 

I also reported it to www.amsmeteors.org

 

Plate solved http://nova.astromet...65791#annotated


Edited by AntMan1, 03 April 2019 - 02:54 PM.

  • nateman_doo likes this

#18 freestar8n

freestar8n

    Vendor - MetaGuide

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 8552
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2007

Posted 03 April 2019 - 04:41 PM

I’m afraid it is much more likely to be a bright star that either started stationary and then moved out of frame - or it started outside and moved into frame and stopped briefly.

The other stars would have done the same thing but they may be too faint to show trails.

Images like this that - I think - capture multiple scenes and motions in a single frame do pop up occasionally.

Frank

#19 kledward

kledward

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 20
  • Joined: 26 Feb 2019

Posted 03 April 2019 - 05:40 PM

Wow just wow! are you telling me all that detail was in that original photo? I am convinced it was some type of space junk or a rock burning up in the atmosphere now. Is there any agency that could help tell us what it is? What is your opinion?

 

link to original fit 

 

https://drive.google...1_ePHGJWqVVOup6

 

I also reported it to www.amsmeteors.org

 

Plate solved http://nova.astromet...65791#annotated

 

Shrapnel from India's anti satellite missile test is supposed to be re-entering over the next few weeks:

https://www.space.co...est-debris.html

 

I wonder if that was a piece


  • AntMan1 likes this

#20 rekokich

rekokich

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 751
  • Joined: 14 Sep 2014
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 04 April 2019 - 07:33 AM

AntMan1,

I think the event was a small bolide which exploded high in the atmosphere. Looking at the path, there is evidence of initial entry, heating up, ablation and the final explosion. Some meteors, usually originating from comets, contain substantial proportions of volatiles like ice, dry ice (CO2), ammonia, and methane. When the volatiles in the interior reach high temperature, they rapidly evaporate, expand, and cause an explosion which disintegrates the meteor. You are very fortunate to have caught the entire event in a random 3 second exposure. I would consider submitting the image to various meteor societies.
https://www.amsmeteors.org/
https://www.imo.net/
https://ukmeteornetwork.co.uk/


  • AntMan1 and Earthbound1 like this

#21 nateman_doo

nateman_doo

    Viking 1

  • **---
  • Posts: 679
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Dirty Jersey

Posted 04 April 2019 - 08:27 AM

I wanna play around with the original sub later when I get home from work.  I need the practice processing...



#22 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 04 April 2019 - 12:50 PM

AntMan1,

I think the event was a small bolide which exploded high in the atmosphere. Looking at the path, there is evidence of initial entry, heating up, ablation and the final explosion. Some meteors, usually originating from comets, contain substantial proportions of volatiles like ice, dry ice (CO2), ammonia, and methane. When the volatiles in the interior reach high temperature, they rapidly evaporate, expand, and cause an explosion which disintegrates the meteor. You are very fortunate to have caught the entire event in a random 3 second exposure. I would consider submitting the image to various meteor societies.
https://www.amsmeteors.org/
https://www.imo.net/
https://ukmeteornetwork.co.uk/

Thank you for the information. I think this is the best explanation here so far. I tried the other two links but they all go back to the fireball reports fourm. I sent in a UK version. Someone looked at the report and grouped it with one other observer but did not say anything else. 

 

https://fireball.ams...w/report/165291

 

This report has been linked to the following event: Event 1232-2019


  • rekokich likes this

#23 AntMan1

AntMan1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2007
  • Loc: NY

Posted 05 April 2019 - 07:15 PM

At first Robert Lunsford from the American Meteor Society thought it may have been one of the most detailed photos of a meteor he had seen. He shared it with his colleagues and they came to the conclusion below..oh well still a great lucky shot!

 

 

"Anthony,

We have come to the conclusion that this was a satellite or space debris. To cross half of the frame in 3 seconds is much too slow to be a meteor. Meteors rarely last this long and if it did it usually covers ten’s of degrees within this duration.

Regardless of what it is, you have captured an extraordinary image. Thanks for sharing it with us!"

Robert Lunsford
American Meteor Society



#24 jdupton

jdupton

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1709
  • Joined: 21 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Central Texas, USA

Posted 05 April 2019 - 07:32 PM

Anthony,

 

   I don't follow the reasoning there.

 

   The frame was a 3 second exposure. The longest time for the object to traverse the frame and show the full track would be 3 seconds. However, a meteor that crossed the frame in 0.01 second during that 3 second interval would look exactly the same as your image. I still think it is a meteor.

 

 

John


Edited by jdupton, 05 April 2019 - 07:33 PM.

  • AntMan1 and rekokich like this

#25 ShortLobster

ShortLobster

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2016
  • Loc: Stamford, CT, USA

Posted 05 April 2019 - 07:35 PM

I'm not following Robert Lunsford's reasoning. Just because the exposure time was 3 seconds does not mean that the object in question was in the image for that entire time. It could have just been in the image for a tenth of a second. 


  • AntMan1 and rekokich like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics