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IDAS LPS-P2 vs Optolong L-Pro vs Orion Skyglow Imaging

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#1 Hsewalia

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 12:54 AM

Hello
I am trying to decide on which of these 3 filters are best for EAA from light polluted area.
I have great comparison curves provided by jimthompson but what I’m looking for now are actual comparison shots for the 3 filters. Or even if anyone has used them and can speak as to which they preferred and why.
Also, the LPS-P2 is 23% more expensive than the Orion, and the L-Pro is 3% more than the LPS-P2...so it would be nice to know whether you guys think they’re worth it!
Thanks
Hsewalia

#2 GaryShaw

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 09:48 AM

Knowledgeable folks will respond in detail but be prepared to read the famous words....”it depends...” they’ll be asking what you plan to view and will make suggestions based on your answers.

 

in the meantime, check out Prairie Astronomy website where’s a good summary of filters and their best uses. Hope this link works...

 

https://www.prairiea...ep-sky-objects/



#3 dani4

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 11:20 AM

I only tried the Optolong L-Pro so I can not compare but this one had a lot of reflections from the stars :S


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#4 Hsewalia

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 11:43 AM

I only tried the Optolong L-Pro so I can not compare but this one had a lot of reflections from the stars :S

Thanks. This is the kind of real-world info I’m looking for. 

As you can tell from the filters I selected, I’m trying to compare 3 popular multi-band LPR filters. 

I’m hoping to find out if one is really better than the other since they all have similar transmissivity curves. 

Maybe one has better anti-reflective coatings than the other, maybe one gives better natural color balance, maybe one gives better contrast, maybe one filters light pollution better? This is the type of feedback I’m looking for. 

Of course if someone has side by side photos of each that would be perfect!



#5 Stargazer3236

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 10:03 PM

I have heard a lot of good reviews pertaining to the IDAS LPS-P2. It seems like the best filter to use for deepsky AP.



#6 Alien Observatory

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 10:11 PM

I have tried IDAS LP2, D1 and D2 along with other filters,  using various ZWO color cams and can say the IDAS LP2 is the best for EAA imaging in average light polluted skies... Pat Utah smile.gif


Edited by Alien Observatory, 04 April 2019 - 10:13 PM.

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#7 Hsewalia

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 10:23 PM

Ok.

So far the P2 seems to be taking the lead. 

Interesting...when I first started looking at LPR filters it was the Optolong L-PRO that seemed to be the talk of the town. 

...waiting to hear if anyone’s backing the L-Pro

And what about the tried and true Orion Skyglow Imaging? 



#8 Alien Observatory

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Posted 05 April 2019 - 09:19 AM

Ok.

So far the P2 seems to be taking the lead. 

Interesting...when I first started looking at LPR filters it was the Optolong L-PRO that seemed to be the talk of the town. 

...waiting to hear if anyone’s backing the L-Pro

And what about the tried and true Orion Skyglow Imaging? 

I have tried that one also along with a Lumicon Deep Sky and UHC, Baader UHCS and the IDAS P2 is still the best when using ZWO color cams...The only reasonable explanation I can give is that the filters we used for many years on CCD cams (Orion, Lumicon, IDAS P1,...) do not work as well in the Color Balance area with the newer CMOS color cams (different efficiencies at different frequencies)... Pat Utah smile.gif


Edited by Alien Observatory, 05 April 2019 - 09:20 AM.


#9 Hsewalia

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Posted 05 April 2019 - 05:46 PM

Now the Orion Skyglow Imaging is about 25% cheaper than the IDAS and Optolong. 

Does anyone think it’s a better deal to go with the Orion?

I’ll be imaging with unmodified DSLR



#10 Ted Dobosz

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 11:08 PM

I'm a bit late on this discussion.  I can only discuss the Optolong L-Pro. The IDAS seems to be the most popular choice.

I recently acquired a ZWO294MC and being in a Bortle 7 sky I desperately need to use a light pollution filter.  The L-Po worked well and what I like is that it produced a natural looking colour balance, not withstanding tweaks by me after the fact :)

 

Here is a link to a FLICKR image of Eta Carina. The image consists of 90 x 4 minute exposures that were stacked on the fly using SharpCap software, 90mm lens, ASI294MC camera, Optolong LP-Pro filter and Losmandy G11 GT mount.

 

Ted

 

 https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/



#11 descott12

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 01:00 PM

I have the IDAS LPS P2. I like it but I have nothing to compare it to.  It is useful for nebula but not galaxies. I think you always want them to work better than they do so not sure it is worth it??? I think I spent about $200 for it so it was not cheap.

I would recommend trying to see one or more of them in action before spending the money.  And I guess it probably depends on the wavelength of light pollution you have to contend with.



#12 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 03:16 PM

DonBoy uses the P2 for galaxies with a 294mc and gets beautiful results. I've ordered one.

By the way I use an NB1 for moonlit nights on narrowband targets. It works like champ.
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#13 descott12

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 04:22 PM

DonBoy uses the P2 for galaxies with a 294mc and gets beautiful results. I've ordered one.

 

Hmmm, I may have to try it again for galaxies. I think I read that they didn't help and maybe I was pre-biased into thinking it would not work...



#14 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 05:07 PM

The P2 is his general go to for light pollution and EAA. The results speak for itself!

#15 descott12

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 05:40 PM

My understanding is that they do work well, however, since galaxies are basically just a bunch of stars emitting full-spectrum light, then you would actually loose alot if using an LP filter.  Nebula, on the other had would benefit greatly since they emit on very narrow bands. I definitely use mine for emission nebula and I think it works well. I seem to remember experiencing a significant dimming effect with galaxies so I stopped using it for them...Maybe time to re-assess that.



#16 DSO_Viewer

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 12:44 AM

My understanding is that they do work well, however, since galaxies are basically just a bunch of stars emitting full-spectrum light, then you would actually loose alot if using an LP filter.  Nebula, on the other had would benefit greatly since they emit on very narrow bands. I definitely use mine for emission nebula and I think it works well. I seem to remember experiencing a significant dimming effect with galaxies so I stopped using it for them...Maybe time to re-assess that.

The IDAS-P2 filter is fantastic also for galaxies when your stranded in light pollution like I am here in California.

 

Steve



#17 Stargazer3236

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 08:35 PM

I just recently bought the Orion Skyglow imaging 2" Filter. As soon as I can get some clear skies, up here near Boston, I will get out and take some images with it. However, I have inquired to Hutech about buying an LPS-P2 48mm filter, so I will have two choices when I go out imaging. I will post my results if and when I can get clear skies (Seems like we switched weather patterns with Seattle, Washington)




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