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What’s your favorite size binoculars for open clusters

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#26 25585

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 05:39 PM

11x70 Helios Lightquest. Same as the APM I believe.



#27 Beg

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Posted 25 April 2019 - 07:18 PM

Seems that the thousands of open clusters are excellent with just about anything. Very much enjoy cruising around with the 15X50 Canon IS in the arm chair looking at clusters. The 100mm BT's with a range of Morphs at different magnifications takes that to a whole different level and perspective. And the Denk Binoviewer on the 9.25 SCT on Caroline's Rose is one of the most awesome views I've ever seen.

 

What they have in common is two eye's. It's all good.......


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#28 Erik Bakker

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 02:34 AM

For large clusters like the Hyades, I enjoy the very wide field of my 8x30's, encompassing 8.8 degrees of the stars, although it's small aperture benefits from very dark and transparent skies. I prefer the much brighter 10x56 for viewing the vividness of the stars, although it's 6.3 degree field is already a bit tight for the largest star clusters. For cruising the sky and seeing the diversity of the clusters in their surroundings, it is my most used instrument by far. But in search for more detail or to enjoy the glorious 4 degree views they present, nothing is quite like my 18x70's on a showpiece like the Pleiades.

By todays standard, even 70mm binoculars seem quite small now.



#29 Tony Flanders

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 05:47 AM

Open clusters are just so different, they're definitely not a one size fits all object.  Large, bright open clusters can be nicely framed in 10x50s with a 6.5 degree AFoV.

 

Actually, I can think of very few open clusters where I find 10X binoculars ideal. The Hyades and Coma Star Cluster are too big for 10X, and I much prefer the Pleiades and Beehive at 15X or even 20X.

In general, I like open clusters best when they fill half the field by linear measure, though that depends a lot on their brightness, richness, and the darkness of the sky. So in the overwhelming majority of cases, I find conventional binoculars too small to give really pleasing views of individual clusters. They are great, however, for showing clusters in context. For instance NGC 1981 is no great shakes on its own, but its location directly north of the 1977 complex and M42 makes it truly special.



#30 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 02:19 AM

Actually, I can think of very few open clusters where I find 10X binoculars ideal. The Hyades and Coma Star Cluster are too big for 10X, and I much prefer the Pleiades and Beehive at 15X or even 20X.

In general, I like open clusters best when they fill half the field by linear measure, though that depends a lot on their brightness, richness, and the darkness of the sky. So in the overwhelming majority of cases, I find conventional binoculars too small to give really pleasing views of individual clusters. They are great, however, for showing clusters in context. For instance NGC 1981 is no great shakes on its own, but its location directly north of the 1977 complex and M42 makes it truly special.

 

Tony:

 

The Hyades fit in a 6.5 degree field, there are a variety of larger clusters like Collinder 65 that are a nice fit.. Mel 20 fits and while maybe not optimal, the Pleiades are still stunning in 10x50s.

 

But my point wasn't that 10x50s are optimal, it was just the opposite:

 

"Open clusters are just so different, they're definitely not a one size fits all object.  Large, bright open clusters can be nicely framed in 10x50s with a 6.5 degree AFoV.  Others are best in larger binos, I like my Resolux 15x70s with plenty of eye relief and a 4.4 degree AFoV. 

 

Many clusters are best seen in a telescope.  M7 is a far different animal in 12.5 inch or 16 inch than it is in 10x50s or a 20x100s. 

 

My thinking is one wants a wide range of capabilities."

 

Jon



#31 Thphy

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 11:55 PM

I guess mine will have to be the Oberwerk 20x110mm since that’s all I use at the moment. These frame M45 nicely. M44 looks awesome as well. I haven’t seen the double cluster yet with them, but have seen Omega! Nice.
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#32 Binojunky

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:08 AM

Cannon IS 12x36, D.



#33 AxelB

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 10:36 PM

The flat field of my Orion Resolux 15x70 is great for open clusters. Of course for very large clusters I may prefer my 8x42 Celestron Granite and for tiny ones, a telescope provides a better view.

#34 Bonco2

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 03:27 PM

I use my 10X50's or 7X35's to locate the clusters then switch to my tripod held 20X80's for prolonged views.

Bill


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#35 jerobe

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 04:22 PM

My 10x50s are where I start the observation. If I need more magnification, which is the usual case, I grab the Oracle 3 refractor and start cycling through eyepieces giving me 14x, 20x, 32x and 56x. I have been tempted to buy 15x70, 20x80 or other more powerful binoculars but I wouldn't have any more versatility than I already enjoy.


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#36 jaraxx

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 05:28 AM

Nikon AE 12x50s


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#37 Miranda2525

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 01:41 PM

Open clusters are probably my favorite binocular views

 

but not sure if I like the wide views of lower power binoculars better to see the whole area or higher magnification to bring out more of the diamond like sparkle 

 

so whats your go to binoculars size for open cluster?

For me, low power binoculars just don't cut it for astronomy. Everything is so small. I prefer at least a 10x50 up to 20x80. 

 

I am currently using a pair of 16x50 Nikon Aculon. I really like the image scale of higher power binoculars for astronomy. 




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