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Is this stick PC good enough for EAA?

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#1 Lorenz0x7BC

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 01:25 PM

I found this:

 

https://www.amazon.c...®/dp/B078Z3YB58

 

Here are the interesting specs:

CPU Type: Quad Core Intel® Celeron® N3450, 4 x 1100 MHz with Intel® Burst Technology up to 2200 MHz, passive CPU cooler, silent
Hard Drive: 64 GB eMMC/SSD memory - 18 GB free
Memory: 4 GB DDR3 RAM
Graphics: Intel® HD Graphics 500 with Intel® Quick Sync Video, Intel® Clear Video HD Technology and Intel® Wireless Display - HDMI 1.4b
Motherboard: Mini PC motherboard, SOC, 2 x USB 3.1 (Type A) - HDMI 1.4b output (audio/video), Micro SD card reader (SDXC/SDHC, Max. 256GB Solid State Drive, Bluetooth 4.2, 1 x Micro USB Power Connector, Kensington lock, headphone output
Network: 10/100/1000 Mbit/s Gigabit Ethernet LAN
WLAN: 433 Mbit/s Wireless LAN, Intel® a/c 3165, 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi, transfer rate: 300 Mbit/s (2.4 GHz); 433 Mbps (5 GHz), Bluetooth 4.2
Sound: Integrated onboard 5.1 Controller HD Audio/Stereo Jack output 5.1 audio adapter from HDMI Power
Card Reader: Micro SD card reader for SD/SDHC/SDXC up to max. 256 GB
Casing: Mini PC on a stick casing 150 x 54 x 17 mm.
Power supply: External 5 V/3 A Power Supply, mute, Micro USB, Cable Length: 2 m
Operating System: Windows 10 Pro, 64bit, pre-installed

My plan is to pin it to the Evo8 mount and connect it to a ZWO ASI 294 MC Pro (+Hyperstar) via USB3 cable. (I would then remotely connect to the stick PC from my MacBook via RDP)

 

As a suitable battery pack for the stick pc (apparently needs 5V/3A) i found this: 

https://www.amazon.c...e/dp/B00P1WQHQ8

(Poweradd Pilot X7 20,000mAh 2x 5V/3.1A)

 

I was wondering if the stick has enough amperage through its USB3 output to power the (uncooled) camera or if I need an extra powered USB Hub? (Obviously to use the camera cooled I would need another 12V/3A power supply)

 

In summary: Do you think this tiny Win10Pro PC has enough computing power to run SharpCap, get all captures from the camera in realtime and then send its screen output via WiFI/RDP? 



#2 ccs_hello

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 02:34 PM

N3450's TDP is 6W.  It is not suitable for stick PC form factor without significant throttling-down.  Then you'll have to ask why pay that much to get a crippled one...

 

(Actually, even for a 2.5W TDP Intel ATOM in stick PC form factor, some already complains about its performance de-rating...



#3 Noah4x4

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 04:05 PM

It might (just) suffice if you disable RemoteFX compression in Windows Remote Desktop to permit the screen data to flow unrestricted between the two computing devices. However, each frame is likely to be around 48mb. It is likely to be potentially too slow and clunky. My personal opinion is that you may need more computing ooomph for a camera of this resolution and sensor size.



#4 CityObserver

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 04:35 AM

I do almost exactly what you’re trying to do. I have the 294pro and a M3 compute stick and use rdp on my iPad, iPhone and Mac to control it.

There are two issues you’re likely to find. First... the Celestron processor may not be that responsive for eaa. The M3 is fast enough... just... to deal with SharpCap livestacking the full res images. It’s fine I suppose but I get irritated by any lag at all, and there is definitely lag when you play with the histogram in SharpCap with the 294.

The second issue is the hub. It will entirely depend on the stick’s psu. However, I would strongly reccomend a smal powered external hub for two reasons. First even if it works 95% of the time you don’t want a small power requirement surge to kill your machine and reboot. I tried to use the stick this way and it’s just too annoying. It was happening once a session and it was a real pain. A small powered travel usb hub is an easy fix that doesn’t add much size or weight. I got an anker one that is the same size as the stick.

The other thing is that 2.4g WiFi signal interferes with usb3. This is a known problem with the standards specifications. This causes your rdp connection to drop randomly. Either way, using the external usb hub helps minimise the interference - at least it did on mine.

And it gives you the added benefit of extra usb connections...

Power wise I use a standard phone/laptop lithium ion power bank to run everything (stick, hub, mini WiFi router, cameras). The key thing is to get the high voltage versions usually branded quick charge. It’ll give you the voltage output on the specs. If I remember right my stick is rated at 3 but sometimes needs more so you want the headroom.

Edited to change 5 to 2.4 as mentioned below.

Edited by CityObserver, 08 April 2019 - 10:38 AM.


#5 Lorenz0x7BC

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 05:04 AM

Could you point me to that Anker powered hub? That sounds like a perfect fit.

 

Regarding the interference issue: I thought that's only happening when combining USB3 devices with the 2.4Ghz band... Are you sure 5GHz is affected as well?



#6 roelb

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 09:18 AM

Interference is indeed between USB3 and 2.4 GHz. 5 GHz is fine.

#7 CityObserver

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 10:37 AM

Apologies. You’re right it is 2.4 not 5. Edited the post to correct.

#8 Noah4x4

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 12:28 PM

I see that the OP has an Evolution scope. Celestron WiFi also uses the 2.4Ghz channel. Here are four thoughts about WiFi interference in the event that Celestron WiFi or 2.4Ghz might feature in his plans...

 

1. Celestron has just released a new version of the Evolution mount firmware which is in beta-test in TeamCelestron. It should be in the public domain very soon as early reports are satisfactory.

 

The latest generation of Celestron WiFi is much superior to previous versions but to optimise its benefits and eliminate a few other minor bugs this firmware update is desirable. 

 

2. Avoid having your USB3 cables running too close to your SkyPortal external WiFi accessory  and/or Celestron internal WiFi receiver (which is inside your mount) even if Celestron WiFi is not in use (n.b. it still broadcasts if not connected). 

 

I originally had my camera USB3 cable running (from Hyperstar) down my OTA and past my SkyPortal dongle in AUX2 and down the vertical arm of the mount where the internal WiFi is located. I had lots of problems with inexplicable disconnects with versions 1, 2 and 3 of Celestron WiFi. However, now that my cables run freely to my Intel NUC that is now located in a portable plastic Toolbox and since these cables are well away from the scopes WiFi devices I have had no further problems with my SkyPortal WiFi device.

 

3.  Avoid cheap 'dual band' wireless extenders and similarly cheap router/hubs if possible.

 

My British Telecom router/hub permits me to seperate the 5Ghz and 2.4Ghz wireless channels. My MESH enabled Netgear EX8000 wireless extender is similar. Ever since I forced my 5Ghz devices to use only the 5Ghz channel that too has contributed to stability. Previously, "Windows" was determining which channel each device might use. Some 5 Ghz were defaulting to the 2.4Ghz channel and I am convinced were suffering from conflicts with the USB3 that my camera prefers. This tip also applies to Windows Remote Desktop. 

 

4.  If using Windows Remote Desktop then disable or reduce RemoteFX compression.That allows screen data to flow unrestricted. Gets rid of lag and stutter even with 4K UHD cameras.

 

Solving remote control by WiFi can be frustrating. You need the right amount of computing 'ooomph', network capacity and battery power. But even then, issues like those I describe above can trip you up. If possible, get everything running on USB3 and 5Ghz. It is perhaps time Celestron upgraded its wireless products to 5 Ghz. However, using these tips the latest generation will work fine. 


Edited by Noah4x4, 08 April 2019 - 04:12 PM.

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#9 CityObserver

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 01:06 PM

https://www.amazon.c... powered&sr=8-5

It works powered and unpowered.

#10 Lorenz0x7BC

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 02:19 PM

CityObserver, thanks for the usb hub link!

 

Noah4x4, very insightful thoughts. 

 

This whole issue is a real bummer: having the Evolution mount with built-in WiFi (2.4Ghz!) and then not being able to pair it with USB3 devices (which the current generation cameras demand) ruins the whole point of having a WiFi-enabled telescope! bawling.gif

 

Noah4x4, I have read in one of your previous posts that you even bought the latest SkyPortal WiFI module to overcome those WiFI connections problems. Kinda crazy to need an internal and an external WiFi module...

 

2 questions:

Does the latest SkyPortal use the 5 Ghz frequency band?

When I switch the internal module off with the hand control, will I then get rid of those interferences?



#11 Noah4x4

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 04:05 PM

CityObserver, thanks for the usb hub link!

 

Noah4x4, very insightful thoughts. 

 

This whole issue is a real bummer: having the Evolution mount with built-in WiFi (2.4Ghz!) and then not being able to pair it with USB3 devices (which the current generation cameras demand) ruins the whole point of having a WiFi-enabled telescope! bawling.gif

 

Noah4x4, I have read in one of your previous posts that you even bought the latest SkyPortal WiFI module to overcome those WiFI connections problems. Kinda crazy to need an internal and an external WiFi module...

 

2 questions:

Does the latest SkyPortal use the 5 Ghz frequency band?

When I switch the internal module off with the hand control, will I then get rid of those interferences?

If only life was that simple....

 

There are three generations of Celestron WiFi.

The first, identified by a signal named 'SkyQLink' is not very good.

The second, identified by 'Celestron.xx' is much better.

The third, 'Celestron.xxx' is vastly superior.

 

I had the misfortune to buy a 2015 vintage Evolution with generation one WIFI. But it works fine with generation two or three SkyPortal dongles, that is until you bring other more recent complex factors into the mix. I now use the latest third Generation SkyPortal external WiFi accessory and switch off internal WiFi. But more recent internal Evolution WiFi is fine. This simply reflects the rapid progression of the technology. Consider how far a mobile telephone has advanced in the same time frame. Nobody would expect a manufacturer to upgrade a five year old phone from G3 to G5, or an older television from 1080p HD to 4k UHD without cost. Yet, we seem to expect our older equipment to benefit from new advances. But why? Redundancy is part of any technology cycle.

 

ALL are 2.4Ghz. However, this is perfectly normal for this type of device because 2.4Ghz signals are stronger than 5Ghz, and 2.4Ghz has better range, but this channel has quite recently been found to be vulnerable to USB3 interference. But USB3 came much later, so we cannot blame Celestron for any unexpected consequences of future technology. I believe Celestron is looking at this as ever more clutter pollutes 2.4Ghz. But again, technology redundancy is natural and eventually inevitable. But in the world of astronomy we seem reluctant to accept this.

 

However, lets not make a big deal of this. Both Celestron second and third generation WiFi will work fine if you keep your USB3 cables a reasonable distance from their receivers, which is quite easy with sensible cable management.  So, any interference is wholly manageable, provided that you are aware of its possible existence and take precautions. Frankly, I doubt if Celestron upgrading SkyPortal devices to 5Ghz is an easy solution given that telescope controllers are inherently older serial/RS232 technology for backwards compatibility. But for how long that is sustainable is debatable. Is there any contemporary computer manufactured today with a serial port? Again, why are we clinging on to old technology? 

 

What is (IMHO) more challenging is when using a 2.4Ghz internal wireless adapter in your scope side computer into whiçh you have also plugged in a USB3 cable, hence both are in extreme close proximity. 

 

I have found it better in my dual computer remote control rig to dedicate any older internal 2.4Ghz wireless adapter device to my 2.4 Ghz Skyportal dongle connection and use a seperate 5Ghz external plug in USB wireless adapter for computer to computer. However, you ideally need to be able to seperate your 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz channels on your network to force the latter to connect only over the 5Ghz channel. If you use 'dual band' devices you might be leaving it to Windows discretion. More recent equipment is far superior (notably MESH technology).

 

But these issues are nothing to do with Celestron WiFi that will happily run on the 2.4Ghz channel if you clear that path. Of course, the newer and more modern your computer equipment, then the fewer problems with legacy devices will be incurred, provided they too are upgraded.  Unfortunately, Wireless is inherently temperamental and what many of us are doing is challenging the paradigm. Camera technology is racing ahead of wireless technology.

 

Three months ago I was saying 4K UHD over wireless was not possible due to lag and stutter. Today, the community (e.g. credit to JamesCA) has identified how to disable RemoteFX compression and now it is possible to transmit 4K UHD over wireless. It's just great that we have so many pioneers in Cloudy Nights willing to assist others through this minefield. But let's not blame telescope manufacturers as they can only offer the currrent technology available, and if cameras/USB3 move on, there is inevitable some lag before other technologies catch up. Then when they do, we can't always expect manufacturers to be able to offer new solutions for older technologies.


Edited by Noah4x4, 08 April 2019 - 04:37 PM.

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#12 descott12

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 05:20 PM

 

 

This whole issue is a real bummer: having the Evolution mount with built-in WiFi (2.4Ghz!) and then not being able to pair it with USB3 devices (which the current generation cameras demand) ruins the whole point of having a WiFi-enabled telescope! bawling.gif

 

 

I use the built in Evo's wifi and my ASI 294 camera on an 30 foot active USB3 cable without any trouble whatsoever.  I am not sure what the difference is other than the fact that my SkyPortal device is only about 10 feet from the scope. But this means it can be done.

 

My USB3 cable is usually coming off the front of the scope away from the mount's base but it also seems to work without trouble when the camera is at prime focus and the cable runs right over the scope's base.

 

Unrelated point: I think your original post had a system with 4GB RAM. It thing that is really pushing it unless you are ONLY running SharpCap. If you have all your other apps hosted on the remote system it may be ok but I would splurge and get a little more memory. It is cheap and those mini system probably aren't upgradeable later.


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#13 CityObserver

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 03:45 AM

The interference is (mainly) not a huge problem in most applications. It becomes an issue when you have all the electronics packed together in the size of a compute stick and you’re trying to do something like rdp that requires a constant and reliable data stream. Using an external hub reduces the interference.

#14 Blackwikkett

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 05:03 PM

I've done a lot of Live stacking with AstroToaster and SharpCap.  I've tried a few different compute stick PCs with varying levels of performance.  The problem with compute sticks is their inherent low performance due to heat and power availability.  The form factor is perfect and performance is fine if you just want basic control of your mount and other equipment.  The compute stick is even fine for capturing for later processing.  The performance becomes a huge bottle neck when you start stacking on the fly.  As you stack you're applying live processing via stretching, noise reduction, sharpening, color balance etc...  The limits of these under powered devices becomes very evident. 

 

If you have a Micro Center or some other national chain that sells compute sticks in your area.  Take advantage of their return policy and give one a try.  Maybe once you have one in hand the performance will not be an issue for your use case.  If like me the performance is not good enough you'll be able to return it.

 

If you need something assembled, small form factor and performance able to handle live stacking of high resolution images  check out Intel NUC (Skull Canyon.)  These are pricey but performance is also there.

https://www.intel.co...igurations.html



#15 Noah4x4

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 01:27 AM

The other less obvious EAA advantages of an i5 NUC with Iris Plus Graphics....

 

1.  Sufficient USB2 and USB3 ports to not need any external hub.

2.  4K UHD graphics that will support modern CMOS 16 megapixel cameras.

3.  Optane Memory, optimised for graphics intensive use like EAA

4.  Can be pre-installed with Windows 10 Pro (for RDP).

5.  Thunderbolt display port.

6.   Sufficient RAM and processor power.

7.   Can be run "headless"

8    Footprint merely 4 inches x 4 inches.

9.   Easy to attach to scope using supplied VESA plate.

10. 802.11ac 433 Mbps wireless adapter.

 

To put this in perspective, the above NUC specification + 4K UHD monitor = under £800. Cheapest 4k UHD Laptop =£1,800. Yes, much more expensive than a compute stick, but fantastic value (compared to equivalent laptop) given its future-proofing performance. CMOS, large sensor, high resolution astro cameras are becoming mainstream. Cheap Compute Sticks won't support these.



#16 Clouzot

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 01:37 AM

Noah, what kind of voltage would these NUCs need? The most recent ones are rated at 19V (and consume up to 70W) but would they accept something lower?

#17 Lorenz0x7BC

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 02:16 AM

Thank you all for your suggestions, i really appreciate them and I get your point, i really do. Usually I am totally in favor of enough computing power (whatever the cost), I have worked long enough in IT.

But in this case I would like to be able to do live stacking "in the field" with battery supply for the whole night (without having to drag along an enormous and heavy power generator).

Like clouzot asked, I was thinking how do you even supply the needed power for a skull canyon NUC in the field?

I don't know, perhaps my wishes are totally unrealistic... Perhaps I wish for something that simply can't be done.

So I know that a stick PC is limited, but It would be small, lightweight and its power consumption needs would be low. If it is too weak to perform live stacking with SharpCap while controlling mount and camera then I am on a false route.

Another idea: What about reducing the camera resolution? Ie. taking the ASI 385 MC Cool with only 2 megapixels. I know that's really not the best solution (and not future proof at all) but would this allow decent live stacking with a stick PC? Or is this even worse in terms of live EAA experience?

#18 Blackwikkett

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 02:55 AM

Not sure how much weight you want to haul into the field but you may want to consider building a battery / DC/AC inverter.  I picked up a marine deep cycle battery dropped it in a battery box and connected a true sine wave dc to ac inverter.  This was enough to power 90w laptop, iOptron mount guide and image camera, dew heater for 3 straps and power supply for image camera cooler.  Lasted two night before I charged it.  Didn't put a meter on it to see the level but handled the load for two 6 plus hour nights of imaging and stacking while I RDP'd to the system.  Total cost was about $200 if memory serves.  

 

This rig would handle the NUC for a night at least probably more.  Keep in mind the computer will not be constantly under max load.  Only those times when making adjustments then mostly just sites there grabs frames and stacks.



#19 Noah4x4

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:04 AM

Noah, what kind of voltage would these NUCs need? The most recent ones are rated at 19V (and consume up to 70W) but would they accept something lower?

Good question!

 

Also, whilst I agree with the previous post, modern large sensor cameras can churn out individual frames exceeding 48 Mb. One should not underestimate the processing power and memory requirements.

 

But the latest 19v/70w NUCs are probably over-kill. Correspondingly, cheap Compute Sticks might be underpowered for the latest generation of CMOS cameras. I would advocate a minimum M3 processor for  (say) an ASI1600, ASI294, Atik Horizon or similar. I do know people that use an M3 NUC, but acknowledge it is on the limits. I use an i5 NUC, which is more comfortable. But you probably don't need i7, i8 etc. and/or higher voltage specifications.

 

My Intel i5 NUC with Iris Plus Graphics is rated "12v to 19v + or - 5%". But it's a bit more subtle than that. They do seem to prefer the higher end, but with enough Amps will run at 12v (But no less).

 

In my experience they don't like cheap Chinese "12v" batteries that actually offer 11.6v and have a steep discharge curve reducing from that. But they will work fine with good quality 12v batteries like a Tracer 22Ah. But do watch the overall amps requirement for your rig (see below).

 

The best value budget priced power source that I found is a MaxOak K2 "50,000 mAh" (£112) using its 20v output that is actually measured at 19.3v so within tolerance.  This unit offers 185 watt-hours and outputs 3 Amps at 20v (or 2.5 Amps at its 12v output). Runs a NUC for many hours at "20v". However, the low amps means you need a seperate battery for camera etc. But the unit is pocket sized and portable, so having two MaxOak K2 is possibly a good solution for many EAA situation (one outputting 12v for camera etc).

 

The i5 NUC typically requires around 25 watts. However, at peak load it might demand 40 watts. The MaxOak K2's 20v x 3A = 60w is fine, but one can see why 12v x 2.5A = 30w is marginal and why cheap "12v" batteries are unwise. However, load depends on what you are processing. You might be fine with just Sharpcap, but add focusser, scope control and guiding software and you probably need the 'ooomph' of an i5 processor, plus bags of storage.

 

In summary, this post further endorses why you need more computing 'ooomph' and decent battery power with large sensor, high resolution cameras that might also demand 2A in isolation. If you use cheap compute sticks and cheap 12v batteries you may struggle. 


Edited by Noah4x4, 10 April 2019 - 04:12 AM.

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#20 Clouzot

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 07:21 AM

Good question!

 

Also, whilst I agree with the previous post, modern large sensor cameras can churn out individual frames exceeding 48 Mb. One should not underestimate the processing power and memory requirements.

 

But the latest 19v/70w NUCs are probably over-kill. Correspondingly, cheap Compute Sticks might be underpowered for the latest generation of CMOS cameras. I would advocate a minimum M3 processor for  (say) an ASI1600, ASI294, Atik Horizon or similar. I do know people that use an M3 NUC, but acknowledge it is on the limits. I use an i5 NUC, which is more comfortable. But you probably don't need i7, i8 etc. and/or higher voltage specifications.

 

My Intel i5 NUC with Iris Plus Graphics is rated "12v to 19v + or - 5%". But it's a bit more subtle than that. They do seem to prefer the higher end, but with enough Amps will run at 12v (But no less).

 

In my experience they don't like cheap Chinese "12v" batteries that actually offer 11.6v and have a steep discharge curve reducing from that. But they will work fine with good quality 12v batteries like a Tracer 22Ah. But do watch the overall amps requirement for your rig (see below).

 

The best value budget priced power source that I found is a MaxOak K2 "50,000 mAh" (£112) using its 20v output that is actually measured at 19.3v so within tolerance.  This unit offers 185 watt-hours and outputs 3 Amps at 20v (or 2.5 Amps at its 12v output). Runs a NUC for many hours at "20v". However, the low amps means you need a seperate battery for camera etc. But the unit is pocket sized and portable, so having two MaxOak K2 is possibly a good solution for many EAA situation (one outputting 12v for camera etc).

 

The i5 NUC typically requires around 25 watts. However, at peak load it might demand 40 watts. The MaxOak K2's 20v x 3A = 60w is fine, but one can see why 12v x 2.5A = 30w is marginal and why cheap "12v" batteries are unwise. However, load depends on what you are processing. You might be fine with just Sharpcap, but add focusser, scope control and guiding software and you probably need the 'ooomph' of an i5 processor, plus bags of storage.

 

In summary, this post further endorses why you need more computing 'ooomph' and decent battery power with large sensor, high resolution cameras that might also demand 2A in isolation. If you use cheap compute sticks and cheap 12v batteries you may struggle. 

Thanks Noah, a very thorough summary of what to expect (and to choose) when it comes to current stick PCs offerings.

 

The reason I was asking is I initially thought a simple setup using alligator clamps and a deep-cycle ("house" / "service", not engine starter) 12V marine battery would probably do, as the latter come in all sizes (from 20Ah to 140Ah and more). And boy do they deliver: the ones I have on my boat can happily power lights, freezers, radar, water pressure pumps, TV... for days when anchoring out at sea, even during winter.

 

But I understand that compared to (brand) turnkey powerpacks, one still has to add fuses, DC outlets, and most probably some form of regulator (mine typically delivers 12.8V when fully charged and gradually decreases to a bit less than 12V before it dies) in order to power those i5 stick-PCs, a camera, the focuser, and charge the tablet in the meanwhile...

 

Not an easy choice!



#21 Michaeljhogan

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 04:26 PM

Good question!

 

Also, whilst I agree with the previous post, modern large sensor cameras can churn out individual frames exceeding 48 Mb. One should not underestimate the processing power and memory requirements.

 

But the latest 19v/70w NUCs are probably over-kill. Correspondingly, cheap Compute Sticks might be underpowered for the latest generation of CMOS cameras. I would advocate a minimum M3 processor for  (say) an ASI1600, ASI294, Atik Horizon or similar. I do know people that use an M3 NUC, but acknowledge it is on the limits. I use an i5 NUC, which is more comfortable. But you probably don't need i7, i8 etc. and/or higher voltage specifications.

 

My Intel i5 NUC with Iris Plus Graphics is rated "12v to 19v + or - 5%". But it's a bit more subtle than that. They do seem to prefer the higher end, but with enough Amps will run at 12v (But no less).

 

In my experience they don't like cheap Chinese "12v" batteries that actually offer 11.6v and have a steep discharge curve reducing from that. But they will work fine with good quality 12v batteries like a Tracer 22Ah. But do watch the overall amps requirement for your rig (see below).

 

The best value budget priced power source that I found is a MaxOak K2 "50,000 mAh" (£112) using its 20v output that is actually measured at 19.3v so within tolerance.  This unit offers 185 watt-hours and outputs 3 Amps at 20v (or 2.5 Amps at its 12v output). Runs a NUC for many hours at "20v". However, the low amps means you need a seperate battery for camera etc. But the unit is pocket sized and portable, so having two MaxOak K2 is possibly a good solution for many EAA situation (one outputting 12v for camera etc).

 

The i5 NUC typically requires around 25 watts. However, at peak load it might demand 40 watts. The MaxOak K2's 20v x 3A = 60w is fine, but one can see why 12v x 2.5A = 30w is marginal and why cheap "12v" batteries are unwise. However, load depends on what you are processing. You might be fine with just Sharpcap, but add focusser, scope control and guiding software and you probably need the 'ooomph' of an i5 processor, plus bags of storage.

 

In summary, this post further endorses why you need more computing 'ooomph' and decent battery power with large sensor, high resolution cameras that might also demand 2A in isolation. If you use cheap compute sticks and cheap 12v batteries you may struggle. 

 

I just ordered my two Intel NUC8I5BEK, i5-8259U with 512gb SSD and 16GB of DDR4 2400mhz just have to get a 1080p IPS monitor

i might need a Pegasus Pocket Powerbox because the powertank i have only has 3 12v leads yet i have to power the mount the ASI294mc Pro

the dew strap and the I5 NUC thats 4 12v leads.




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