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Finally bit the bullet and bought my dream scope

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#26 AtmosFearIC

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:15 PM

I used to use a standard EQ6 with my Mewlon 250 and for visual it does a good job but does take a few seconds for it to all dampen down.
As Kunama says, the tripod will be the weak point when it comes to “the shakes”.

#27 Reid W

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:57 PM

I use the Eq6 on JMI heavyweight wheelie bar, from there is a loaded C11 and then a Denk II binoviewer.  

 

It's not a Rock of Gibralter setup, but for me, even in planetary viewing, the rig is perfectly adequate .



#28 clusterbuster

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 12:00 AM

Very Nice, ENJOY the Great Views !!!

Mark



#29 junomike

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 06:12 AM

Congrats Tyson, can't wait for first report!



#30 Tyson M

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 10:13 AM

First Light- Friday night, April 12 2019

 

Backyard session amidst the border of a red / white zone in a small city. First quarter moon-my favorite phase.

 

Clear skies, great seeing, good to poor transition of transparency. 2.5 hours out.

 

Clear sky chart was wrong tonight and I was very thankful to have set up the Mewlon, because it said transparency was going to be more or less below average (EDIT: by average I mean every two hours it would transition from average to poor transparency throughout the whole night). I only set up because I was thinking about sucker hole lunar viewing, and testing eyepieces and collimation with it. 

 

I set the Mewlon outside to cool down about 30 mins or so as the sun is just starting to go down. I went out and set up my Takahashi dob first, then the Mewlon on the mount.

 

20190412_210637.jpg

 

After collimated the dob and aligning the RA finder (the longest part of the job it seemed), I started viewing the moon with the dob. With a 32mm TV plossl and corrector, I was taken back by the views. 

 

It appeared I was getting good seeing for dusk!  The views were actually refractor like in the MT-160. Definitely like a mak newt.  I got excited and brought out my gf to look.

 

20190412_210715.jpg

 

She is not an observer, just likes to look once every hour or so. She exclaimed it looked very sharp.  Realizing this is the time for high power, I put in a 6 Delos for 221x magnification and had a look. It was a bit dimmer, but image still holding up very well. In fact it was the best lunar viewing I ever had to date.  I could see the tiniest craters and grooves in the lunar surface that I never noticed before. The tiniest fluctuation of seeing would happen, but it would stop every other second or less.  Rupes Recta was dominating the viewing. 

 

I decided to get the Mewlon going. After a 3 star alignment on the EQ6 I went straight away to the moon. 

 

20190412_220733.jpg

 

I put in the 48 Brandon and focused the scope. The electric focuser was premium accessory I never knew I needed. Very cool.  Eye-placement was a bit tricky at first and was getting blackouts while trying to use my new-to-me Brandon EP.  This scope was shipped internationally and still in collimation! That to me is remarkable and a relief.

 

BAM! the view hit me hard in focus. At low power/high exit pupil the view was extremely bright and contrasty.

 

It too was refractor like and blindingly bright.  I put in my #8 Lumicon light yellow filter to tame the view without compromising (lumicon I think makes some of the best filters) and it was incredible. I got my gf and we looked, and just marvelled at how well the Mewlon was showing us a target we have seen many times before in telescopes. 

 

It really does take your words away. There was actually 4 dark patches of lunar soil around Montes Apenninus, not mares, that I never noticed before. Well, I should elaborate, I noticed one or two of them with refractors lots, it draws me in to observe each lunar session. Favorites in smaller scopes, now doubled in the larger one.

 

I put in the 32 Masuyama and had trouble finding words to describe I was seeing.  There was simply too much to take in, especially for a lunar observer who sticks to smaller scopes predominantly. Perhaps if I had observed with larger aperture dobs or cats more I would be use to observing smaller features. 

 

Regardless, I didn't use the MT-160 for the rest of the night, it seemed like a toy.

 

Montes Apenninus- what can I say about it?  I have never seen it so well before in my life.  I could see the slight elevation changes from the flat surface up to the peaks, with what almost seem like mini crater pockets everywhere and irregular terrain everywhere.  Here I put a 20XW, a 17.3 Delos (173x) which looked the best, and finished up with a 14 Delos on this target (the latter starting to dim slightly but image holding up very well).

 

I could see craters like Conon, Aratus, or Joy, easily, but I was drawn into smaller features like Rimae Fresnel and particularly, Rima Hadley the Apollo 15 lunar landing area. That was a first for me.

 

I pulled myself away from the moon and checked out some star clusters. I hit up M36,M37, and M38.  Messier 37 was the best viewed.  Still a bit bright out with light pollution and the moon but plenty of pin point stars with 48 brandon, 40XL and 32 Masuyama ( I rarely used the Pentax 40XL, mostly the other two only).

 

I observed M65 galaxy from the leo triplet, which was very faint diffuse ball of light.

 

I checked out M53 as well, which I initially thought might be a galaxy, but SS5 pro says it is globular cluster.  Seems far away so I read about it, 60 000 light years. Cool.

 

I tried for NGC 6825, the Bear Paw galaxy, but it was too faint for the conditions at mag 11.6.

 

I had a look at M64, the Black Eye galaxy which showed up very well.  Still a diffuse ball of light, but clearly visible in my backyard and conditions.  This one is 17 million light years away!

 

I changed directions and went for M81 and M82. I couldnt quite frame them both with the 32 masu, maybe they were just on the edges but I stuck to observing one at a time.  M81 was easy to observe, like M64. Bight and ovalish.

 

M82's cigar shape had hints of core details. 

 

After the galaxy run, I noticed that poor transparency finally creeping it's way to end the night. I went back to the moon to soak up the views with the 48B and 32M eyepieces before packing it in at 23:30.

 

This scope is exactly what I wanted, and I cant wait to bring it to a dark site. 4 years in the hobby and I can still be wow'd.  This scope was purchased for deep sky mostly but after a lunar session it has earned its permanent place in my stable.  Other scopes I own will be to do things that the Mewlon cant do, like wide field of views (the MT160 can still do that in 2" mode), or grab and go, or solar observing sessions.

 

Thanks for reading and clear skies!


Edited by Tyson M, 13 April 2019 - 12:38 PM.

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#31 Tyson M

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 10:19 AM

Oh, and just for kicks I tried to take an afocal cell phone single shot through the Mewlon when I was in disbelief of the views in the Brandon.  It turned out to be one of the best images from a cell phone I have ever seen lol! 

 

It still does not do it justice to the views, as it is no where near as sharp. 

 

This image is compressed even to fit on CN website. Full resolution at 500KB looks abit more impressive. You can zoom in on it and everything. No processing, single shot with a Samsung.

 

20190412_221940.jpg


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#32 Steve D.

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 10:42 AM

Great first light.   Now I'm really getting anxious to use my 180.


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#33 Scott in NC

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 07:39 PM

Congrats on the scope, and thanks for sharing your first light report and that lunar image with us! :waytogo:


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#34 payner

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 07:40 PM

Enjoyed your report, Tyson.  I believe you are about to be doubly wowed when Jupiter and Saturn reach good elevation.  The details, especially of the often unseen low contrast features will amazing you.  More detail than one really can sketch.

You may have bought it for deepsky, but where this instrument will really come into its own is in planetary, double star and the moon (you know that).

 

Randy


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#35 Tyson M

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 09:08 PM

I used to use a standard EQ6 with my Mewlon 250 and for visual it does a good job but does take a few seconds for it to all dampen down.
As Kunama says, the tripod will be the weak point when it comes to “the shakes”.

I don't doubt this, but I put vibration pads down and with the electronic focuser, I didn't notice obtrusive vibrations.

 

What tripods would you recommend, if the money tree somehow graced my presence again in a couple years lol.



#36 Tyson M

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 09:10 PM

Enjoyed your report, Tyson.  I believe you are about to be doubly wowed when Jupiter and Saturn reach good elevation.  The details, especially of the often unseen low contrast features will amazing you.  More detail than one really can sketch.

You may have bought it for deepsky, but where this instrument will really come into its own is in planetary, double star and the moon (you know that).

 

Randy

I am extremely excited for planetary viewing now. This scope essentially excels at everything except wide field of viewing. But that's what binoculars or refractors are for. Or even my dob.



#37 Tyson M

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 09:50 PM

Deep sky is, of course, wonderful, as all Mewlons have great contrast. But in good seeing, the Mewlon 250 will get you closer to the moon than Neil Armstrong.

 

Bob

You were right, see the first light report lol. I did observe Apollo 15 landing area lol.gif



#38 Axunator

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 10:32 PM

What tripods would you recommend, if the money tree somehow graced my presence again in a couple years lol.

Berlebach Planet (https://www.berlebac...sprache=english):

 

JPEG-kuva.jpeg


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#39 Kunama

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 04:41 PM

The Planet is a beautiful tripod and many miles ahead of the GMT128 that SW supply with these mounts but I take you point about the electric focuser.

 

I modified the stock tripod by making my own brace for it and eventually changed the rather flimsy 26" stainless tubes to thicker walled 40" that way there was no need to extend the legs other than to level the tripod...

 

 



#40 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 04:45 PM

That scope would be insane in my steady seeing.  650x on the moon easy.



#41 coopman

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 05:53 PM

Congrats on the new Tak, Tyson.  Great first light report.


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#42 Tyson M

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 06:38 PM

Thanks guys, I will update this thread with my next dark sky trip. 

 

I have a feeling I will be blown away yet again...



#43 Tyson M

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 05:27 PM

I set up the Mewlon in poor (1/5) to bad (2/5)seeing but excellent transparency but the full moon in the backyard.

 

I wanted to see first hand how the large aperture would do in less than ideal conditions.

 

The moon's light pollution rendered most galaxies invisible from the red/white zone.

 

Even my 80mm apo was having issues with the seeing flickering, with the 10 delos @ 48x mag being the best view on the lunar disk.

 

The Mewlon's view did not hold up nearly as well.  Even at low power with the 48 brandon it was hard to focus and once focused, it phases in and out with clarity.

 

For double stars though seemed unaffected. Cor Caroli , a white primary with green/whitish secondary was beautiful in the 32 masuyama.  Algieba in Leo was brilliant, could handle a 17.3 delos for a nice wide split. 

 

Tonight is looking much better than last night, yet still with a near full moon.  Clear sky chart is listed with above average seeing and average transparency.

 

I will set up the Mewlon again in the backyard to see some up close details of the lunar terrain.


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#44 JMKarian

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:46 PM

Tyson, 

I took the Mewlon plunge a year ago ... and have been extremely happy pairing it up with a refractor.  Last night was probably the best night I’ve had in a long time, spending  hours in the Virgo Supercluster.   The Mewlon’s contrast is exceptional.

 

Enjoy

 

 

John

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#45 Tyson M

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:50 PM

April 20, 2019  Clear skies, great to good seeing, average transparency. A big change from the last report in bad seeing.

 

Backyard session red/white zone, near full moon.

 

Had the Mewlon and Tak MT-160 dob out, mostly stuck with the former.

 

I had a look first before the moon lit up the sky, M67. A fine fainter cluster. I really do enjoy this one.

 

I had a look at Algieba in leo. Two yellow members.

 

I had a look at Porrima, difficult split with companion close by. I think diffraction spikes can get in the way of close doubles.

 

The same was true with Izar, barely able to detect the companion.

 

Cor Caroli is one of my favorite doubles, beautiful, nice and wide split.

 

Mizar and Alcor was very nice. Split Castor.

 

54 Leo was a first time split for me, blue/white duo.

 

I had a look at M81 and M82 (observed one at a time). The moon was just getting over the horizon. With the 55 plossl, m82 narrow shape was readily apparent. I worked up to a 22 nagler, which both galaxies looked great, viewed separately. M82 was one of the best views of the night.

 

I had a look at M3. Started seeing hints of individual members with a 48 brandon, looks like a crystal clear window into space. Loved it. Bumped up to a 10 delos here at 300x mag and held up. Although I didnt notice any improvement from the 22 nagler. All news showed more or less the same amount of stars, with the preference to the 22 rather than higher power. Probably the best views of the night for DSO.

 

I was able to observe each member of the leo triplet. Two galaxies at the same time, M66 and M65. NGC 3628 was a bit further away and fainter to detect.

 

M64 the blackeye galaxy was easy to detect, although my gf had trouble seeing it at all.

 

I observed various other stars, like Arcturus, and went back into the house to take a break and come back out later when the moon was higher.  I love observing the moon in good to great seeing with the mewlon, so I waited a good 1.5 hours inside and outside.

 

I got a good 10 minutes observing the moon with the 55 plossl and 48 brandon.  Both eyepieces are very similar and was hoping to choose one, but I liked them both. 55 for its a bit wider fov and the 48 for its darker sky background. I think I have to keep both eyepieces lol.  They are stunning lunar eyepieces. I use a lumicon #8 light yellow here to subdue the intensity of the light hitting my eyes though.

 

Highlight was seeing the Rimae Petavius in Pentavius crater, and its terraced crater walls. Also the raised ground around Langrenus crater drew my attention.

 

The moon is quickly becoming my favorite target in this scope.  

 

Thanks for reading thus far!  Still no dark site trip with no moon. 


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#46 Arief Muslim

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 05:33 AM

Great report Tyson and congrats on the new scope!

My favourite ep for the Mewlon 250 is a 27mm Pan. I couldn’t detect any coma across the 0.6 degree field.



#47 Tyson M

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 06:58 PM

Great report Tyson and congrats on the new scope!

My favourite ep for the Mewlon 250 is a 27mm Pan. I couldn’t detect any coma across the 0.6 degree field.

Thanks!  It is hard to pick a perfect eyepiece.  So far, the 55 plossl, the 48 brandon, the 32 masuyama, 22 nagler and the 20 pentax have been sublime.  The 48 brandon is truly something special for low power glob work. 

 

The fact I can spot individual stars at such low power in light pollution on M3 is unreal, like I did last night. I had another session in the backyard with no moon and hit or miss transparency.  The 20 pentax broke M3 up into fine diamond dust. Also, split Castor beautifully into its white/ blue secondary pair.

 

For galaxies, I observed M51 (two diffuse nucleus) and tried for M101, couldnt see it.  Tried for M84, not sure if I couldnt see it or if my goto was off.  M65, M66 were way off on the goto and had to find it manually, but once found they were a nice treat in the 32 masuyama.

 

I enjoyed my view of M67 star cluster at the start of the night as well.


Edited by Tyson M, 24 April 2019 - 07:13 PM.

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#48 starman876

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 10:18 PM

Beautiful scope. Got love Taks in the way they look and perform.



#49 Stargazer3236

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 01:54 AM

How come most Tak refractors and some reflectors don 't have dual crayford focusers?



#50 Tyson M

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 06:30 PM

How come most Tak refractors and some reflectors don 't have dual crayford focusers?

Takahashi are very proud of their focusers on their refractors/reflectors.  Not sure why not but they are very good stock focusers. 


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