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I just bought a brand new Questar 3.5

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38 replies to this topic

#26 JamesMStephens

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 09:06 PM

Yep, I looked at and took some pics of the sun yesterday, and I got sunspot detail I never got with my c-8.  There was only one sunspot, but it looked great in the Q.

I've always thought that my Q was a great solar scope.


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#27 munirocks

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 04:08 PM

I think it is as long as you've got a full-aperture solar filter of some sort.

 

The standard off-axis filter is way too small even for casual use, for me at least. The exit pupil is so small that any sunspots are mixed in with eyepiece dust spots and eye floaters. Using a full-aperture filter is a huge improvement.



#28 rcwolpert

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 06:42 PM

Actually, other than scopes specifically designed for solar work, I think the Q with the full solar filter is the perfect solar telescope. It’s so easy to set up and use and take pictures. A no-hassle solar scope!



#29 JREnglar

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 11:42 PM

I think it is as long as you've got a full-aperture solar filter of some sort.

 

The standard off-axis filter is way too small even for casual use, for me at least. The exit pupil is so small that any sunspots are mixed in with eyepiece dust spots and eye floaters. Using a full-aperture filter is a huge improvement.

munirocks,

 

When I used my 1964 Standard Questar to observe the solar eclipse of a year or two ago (~89% totality) from Vancouver, BC using the off-axis solar filter and the Questar 40/80 eyepiece (~26 mm equivalent) I was quite pleased with the view. A cluster of sunspots was clearly visible for me without problems (and my 70 year old eyes have floaters aplenty).  What size eyepiece were you using?

 

JR



#30 munirocks

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 03:21 AM

16 and 12 mm Brandons. I tried to increase the exit pupil by using a 24 Brandon but for my particular off-axis filter the image is actually too bright for comfort. 

 

I think that maybe my daytime eye pupil is very small.



#31 CaptKirk

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 10:08 AM

I would never pay 6K for just a 3.5 inch scope, but I am not rich either.

I did have one of the most respected members on this cite, a real telescope expert, tell me one time that if you took one of the real good meade 90ETX with USA optics, and a questar 3.5, and put them side by side, and cover them up so you would not know which one was which, that the average observer would not be able to tell which scope was which when observing with the same eyepiece. 

As far as optical quality is concerned my experience has been the same. Mechanically, however, the Questar is light years ahead of the ETX. To me it's not worth the high price Questar commands. Plus, I can't afford it anyway.



#32 Pragmatist

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 05:06 PM

Congratulations on your Q. It’s a stunning instrument and the portability is amazing and has easily doubled my viewing time. Such an easy set up and to be able to be observing so quickly is a godsend. It was enough to tempt this Brit into joining the Questar family. No regrets from me. 

Matty


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#33 Toxo144

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 09:02 PM

TheGuppy,

 

Ditto on Matty's post above.  The Q 3.5 is so easy to use and is such a consistent performer that it is easily my most-used scope for visual observing.  Trust me, I have plenty of others, including a Q 7.  I easily spend three times more observing hours with the Q3.5 than any other scope, including some premium refractors.  Why?  Because they take MUCH more mount to set up, are much bulkier, and take a LOT longer to put away.  Baby Q is out and I'm polar aligned, tracking, and enjoying the view in less than 5 minutes.  EXT isn't a bad little scope - until the plastic gears in the drive go bad, or the hand paddle pfutzes out.  Q 3.5 has never let me down - all I had to do was change a 9 volt battery.

 

The more you use your baby Q, you'll find that you love it more and more as the years go by.  It becomes an old familiar reliable friend under the night sky.  Remember, no matter what the cost the best scope is the scope that actually gets used.  Learn the fine points of the Questar, and you'll never regret your decision.  

 

Congrats on owning a truly fine  instrument.

 

Cheers and Clears,

 

Toxo


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#34 RMay

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 09:23 PM

That’s really well said. My first telescope was a C8, which my wife referred to as ‘the bomb’ because of the footlocker that it came in. I kept it for six months before selling it and getting my Questar 3.5, now almost 35 years ago. You’re absolutely right in that a telescope is only as good as how convenient it is to use, and when you add convenience to the optical quality of the Questar, it’s hard to beat.

Ron

Edited by RMay, 16 April 2019 - 10:33 AM.

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#35 TOMDEY

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 09:37 PM

It's a categorization thing. Is a Questar 3.5 worth $6K? Well, sure it is. In the same sense that (real) B&L Ray Bans are worth $300,  my Zeiss 20x60 IS Bino is worth $8K, or a Porsche is worth $70K. Moreover, the chicks dig it.

 

PS: We had Q-7s at work. Never used on the stars. The moment they arrived, we stripped off the back ends and turned them into Lab Collimators! Felt kinda sinful, but it was actually faster and cheaper than making them in-house. And the irony... we were making similar-sized scopes that are used as laser communication collimators!

 

If you don't want to come across as too hoity-toity, you can modestly camouflage your Questar to masquerade as a Celestron... a Classic Celestron... >>>   Tom

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  • 25 questar 7 to celestar camo job.jpg

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#36 Toxo144

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 11:03 PM

Okay, Tomday, this boarders on sacrilege!!!!

 

To the Spanish Inquisition with you.......



#37 Joe Ellis

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 03:51 PM

NO ONE can resist ze Spanish Inquisition!!!

#38 cbwerner

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 07:31 PM

If you don't want to come across as too hoity-toity, you can modestly camouflage your Questar to masquerade as a Celestron... a Classic Celestron... >>>   Tom

NOOOOOOO!!!!! bigshock.gif  :lol:



#39 BillHarris

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Posted Yesterday, 06:20 PM

I've been doing astronomy and working on telescopes for 50 years.

This week, while I've been working on the mount and drive, I have been setting the Q3.5 on the tailgate of my pickup in an Alt-Az mode. Been doing photography (with a Smartphone) and visual observations up to 208x. I've enjoyed that-- little vibration but tracking in two axes.

Now that I have the mount set up and the drive working, this will be a joy to work with.


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