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asi294mc vs ultrastar c

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6 replies to this topic

#1 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 10:36 PM

Well I finally did it.
I've been wanting to compare these two cameras using a narrowband filter for those bright moonlit nights. Ya know... those nights that keep visual observers inside and EAA observers outside and humming with excitement.
Because of clouds (and I'm borrowing the ultrastar color from umasscrew) I was only able to get one target in. The rosette nebula. Here's all the details of gear...
8" f4 Chinese newt
AVX mount
IDAS NB1 2" filter
Starizona filter slider
Urban location, red zone
Moon was waxing gibbous
Used 20x30s unguided subs
Used darks, no flats
No post processing
Used Starlight Live for the ultrastar color and Sharpcap for the 294mc.
The brighter image of the two is the 294.

rps20190415_230952_611.jpg rps20190415_231012_445.jpg

Some thoughts...
Starlight live is incredibly easy to use. It has given me countless nights of hassle free EAA.
Sharpcap is the exact opposite. The learning curve is a lot steeper yet I see superior results from other (smarter) CN users with this software. So I've kept at it, taken notes, asked questions, and learned a lot. (Thanks saguaro and donboy and don rudny)

The best metaphor that comes to my mind is cooking... specifically baking. I enjoy making cookies. They are easy, simple, and straightforward. Pies, on the other hand, are much more involved. But a well crafted pie is worth it, and behind every good pie maker is a lot of crappy pies.

So that's it. Nothing scientific. Just a fun spring night with some cameras.

As far as this NB1 filter goes it's a keeper. I've been doing Hubble palette EAA style with my ultrastar mono and three Orion narrowband 1.25" filters. It's a different barrel of monkeys and the NB1 really streamlines the process of getting nice emission nebula shots. For general purpose light pollution (galaxies) I don't recommend it.

Edited by 39.1N84.5W, 15 April 2019 - 10:41 PM.

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#2 GaryShaw

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 07:59 AM

For clarity, which camera was used on the first image?

thanks

Gary 



#3 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 08:46 AM

The first, top image is asi294mc. Gain 300, brightness 8, cooled at -15.

#4 DSO_Viewer

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 02:47 PM

The first, top image is asi294mc. Gain 300, brightness 8, cooled at -15.

The first image made with the 294mc is hands-down better in every way with much tighter stars, more nebula, richer color, and less noise. Thanks for sharing this.

 

Steve



#5 Startex

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 03:10 PM

I've been researching a camera upgrade recently and the 294 keeps coming up and appears to be the gold standard for EAA these days? Am I wrong?



#6 OleCuss

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 04:11 PM

I've been researching a camera upgrade recently and the 294 keeps coming up and appears to be the gold standard for EAA these days? Am I wrong?

Maybe.  It depends on what you want to do and how you want to do it.

 

One can argue that for certain purposes it can be beaten by the IMX183, the ASI1600, the IMX224, the IMX385, the IMX290, and/or other sensors.  But if one wants OSC the IMX294 cameras can do most forms of OAP really well and if one is to be limited to one camera for that purpose I'd tend to choose the IMX294 camera.

 

As it is, I have several other cameras and while I'd like to have an IMX294 from either QHY or from ASI (they have both made the sensor effectively bigger), I'm not sure I'll get one myself any time soon.  But if I could have only one camera, it'd be the IMX294.


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#7 Startex

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 05:14 PM

Well I just started doing EAA/VA but to be honest I'm basically doing low end AP cause I'm doing 2-4-8 second exposures of DSO's(what I'm most interested in), stacking in DSS and processing in GIMP. I'm using a Nexstar 8SE with a Revolution IMX224 Advanced Imager Kit and ultimately if I stick with it, I'll be upgrading to a nice equatorial mount and get into guided AP. Right now I do have a LXD55 mount but I haven't tried mounting the Nexstar on it as I'm pretty sure it's not up to snuff for AP.

 

The next presumption is that the ZWO ASI294 would be a good camera for more advanced AP and I could use the RI 224 for a guiding unit.


Edited by Startex, 16 April 2019 - 05:17 PM.

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