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Electron Shell = Gravity Shield?

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#1 Brian Albin

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 06:20 PM

Here is one of my wonderings.

Does the electron shell shield Protons from all Gravitation outside the Atom?  So that the only Gravity each proton is subject to is the Gravity of the Neutrons and other Protons of that Nucleus? 

 

If Gravity slows Time, a Proton would experience time at a rate different from us.  Does this explain why Proton decay takes so very long in our time count? 

 

Brian



#2 Taosmath

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 07:18 PM

The brief answer is no.

 

The gravitational force between protons in a nucleus is miniscule , about 2 x10-36N, or about 1 ten billionth of the weight of a proton. The electrostatic (Coulomb) force between protons is about 2 N, i.e. about the weight of 1026Protons.  This repulsive force is exceeded by the attraction of the strong nuclear force, which is why all nuclei don't fly apart due to electrostatic repulsion.  The forces on an electron in an inner shell due the a proton in the nucleus are - gravitation about 1x10-47 N (about 1 billionth of a billionth of the weight of an electron) and the electrostatic force between an electron and a nuclear proton is 2x10-8 N, which is the weight of  about 2x1021 electrons.

 

So not only will the electrostatic force not shield objects from gravitation (otherwise objects inside of charged containers experience a reduced gravity), but the gravitational forces are negligible compared to the electrostatic forces between the components of the atom and the nucleus and the nuclear components experience the Strong nuclear force which is even stronger than that.

 

Current understanding is that a free proton (i.e. one in space outside of the nucleus) is perfectly stable - lifetimes greater than the universe lifetime. Neutrons in the nucleus are stable, but free neutrons have a lifetime of only about 14 minutes, it is believed that the nuclear neutrons are stabilized but the Strong Nuclear force., but I don't know how that happens.


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#3 TOMDEY

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 07:42 PM

Agree with Taosmath! Gravity applies to all massive particles (and systems of particles)... but is profoundly weak, compared with the others  three. So the e.g. electromagnetic fields on the atomic level don't ~shield~ particles from gravitation... rather, it profoundly dominates the miniscule gravitational interactions to insignificance. It all makes nice sense. Large scale... gravitation dominates... small scale, EM dominates... miniscule scale, weak and strong nuclear dominate.

 

Thing is also that large massive bodies (planets, stars, galaxies) are essentially charge-neutral... so ~potential~ electrostatic interactions are effectively zero. But gravitation enjoys no such neutralization. All bodies attract all others by that cumulative GMm/R2 and that adds up to a lot of attraction!    Tom


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#4 Brian Albin

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 07:50 PM

I thank you both for the replies.

I thought I had a clever idea there. But it did not pan out.

 

Brian



#5 Keith Rivich

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Posted 21 April 2019 - 11:52 AM

Since gravity is the curvature of space/time in response to mass there is nothing to shield the proton from. There will be no anti-grav machines anytime soon!

 

For a real world proof cosmic rays follow the curvature of space (gravity) just as one would expect of any object with mass. 




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