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Infrared security camera

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#1 Becomart

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 06:24 PM

I’ve just installed a couple of Nest iq cams to keep an eye on what’s happening outside. They have infrared lights for night vision. Will this cause any issues with imaging using a ccd? I can disable the ir element but then I wouldn’t be able to see my gear so I’m keen to leave it on. 



#2 44maurer

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 06:32 PM

Yes it can, but you can try it out. I have 2 in my backyard and it does not, but have had others confirm that it does.

#3 t_image

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Posted 20 April 2019 - 07:10 PM

I’ve just installed a couple of Nest iq cams to keep an eye on what’s happening outside. They have infrared lights for night vision. Will this cause any issues with imaging using a ccd? I can disable the ir element but then I wouldn’t be able to see my gear so I’m keen to leave it on. 

I'm going to presume that you are pretty intelligent and reasonable.

It would be safe to assume a parallel that the cameras (with IR illuminators) were instead direct beam spotlights or directional flashlights.

If you point your optics towards their direction and the cameras are elevated then you might as well be shining a flashlight towards the objective.

However if you are imaging the sky in the opposite direction, and there are no trees or other things that would reflect back the IR spotlights,

then you would see different results.

Also if you are doing NB, it would be a non-issue....

So it all depends.

Realize there may be alternative solutions such as positioning peripheral accessory IR illuminators low to the ground (while disabling elevated on-camera ones) so as to illuminate what you want but not have it at a level where you will contaminate your imaging.....

If you do a simple search on CN with the search feature you'll find others have already faced this dilemma and have discussed the matter....

ex:

https://www.cloudyni...-camera-lights/


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#4 spokeshave

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Posted 21 April 2019 - 06:42 AM

 

Also if you are doing NB, it would be a non-issue....

 

Not necessarily. Depending on the type of LED, there can be a fair amount of light that extends into the Ha band. I found that out the hard way. I never had a problem in the past, but I recently replaced the cameras in my observatory security system. The new camera caused this:

 

m82.PNG

 

The glare is noticeable only in the stack, not in the subs, and only for Ha - which are much longer exposures than the LRGB subs. In fact, today it is my mission to rig the camera so that I can toggle the IR illuminators remotely.

 

Tim


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#5 spokeshave

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Posted 21 April 2019 - 06:47 AM

This is what my camera sees. The scoped are parked pointing north.

 

lgo.PNG

 

Tim



#6 CharlesW

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Posted 21 April 2019 - 08:49 AM

If you have reliable equipment, you’ll tire of the coolness factor pretty soon but you’ll have to suffer the consequences till then. If you need to make sure it’s parked before the roof moves, you can install a mechanical/electrical interlock on the mount, or an optical one, that prevents the roof from moving if the scope isn’t parked. That’s how I run my Fosters and can’t remember the last time I turned on my camera. 



#7 dawziecat

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Posted 21 April 2019 - 09:31 AM

I am no expert on these devices. The intensity and the wavelength of light they emit for "night vision" purposes may well be variable with brand name, model, etc.

 

That said, I have had two. Both cast beams READILY VISIBLE in the guiding display. It was quite apparent . . . no "buts, ifs or maybes" about it! Just like turning a light on!

So the IR stays off until I actually need to see what is going on during a session. If, I'm awake, I like to turn night vision on to watch an autoflip or a slew to a new target.

While I can't "see" the night vision beam, the cameras certainly can! Been true for both the LAN cameras I have used. 



#8 t_image

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 09:51 AM

Not necessarily. Depending on the type of LED, there can be a fair amount of light that extends into the Ha band. I found that out the hard way. I never had a problem in the past, but I recently replaced the cameras in my observatory security system. The new camera caused this:

 

attachicon.gif m82.PNG

 

The glare is noticeable only in the stack, not in the subs, and only for Ha - which are much longer exposures than the LRGB subs. In fact, today it is my mission to rig the camera so that I can toggle the IR illuminators remotely.

 

Tim

Thanks for the correction I overlooked that NIR LEDs might have visible light spillover-oh yeah the ones with the faint red glow.....




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