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M106, another try this year

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#1 buckeyestargazer

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:04 AM

Every few years I try to capture M106 but I never seem to quite do it justice.  Most of the problem is that the galaxy lies toward my most light polluted area so I can never quite get the contrast and detail I'd like.  Still, I do seem to improve on it each time I try.  

 

One thing to note is to compare last year's image, taken with a CFF250RC at an image scale of 0.62"/px, to this year's image taken with a CFF135 APO at an image scale of 0.86"/px.  In general I see the same amount of detail in both images.  There is the same amount of LRGB data in each image (around 20 hours).  My local seeing conditions, more than the size of the scope aperture, determines in large part the quality of my images.

 

This image has a crazy amount of total integration time, over 36 hours in LRGBHa.  Ha accounts for about 15hrs of that, taken during bright moonlight.  

 

As always, comments and constructive criticism welcome.

M106_4.png


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#2 Svalbard

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:32 AM

Nice work, I'd be happy with that!


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#3 pyrasanth

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:36 AM

That's a nice bright image. I like it!

 

M106, as you may have seen from my recent images, is packed full of detail. I wonder if you would benefit by trying to recapture at a larger image scale. This may help deal with those depressing gradients which trouble all of us. It is possible that you don't have a sufficiently large image scale to see lots of detail and that's why your struggling to improve the image. I might be completely wrong on this but it's good to explore thoughts!


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#4 buckeyestargazer

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:52 AM

That's a nice bright image. I like it!

 

M106, as you may have seen from my recent images, is packed full of detail. I wonder if you would benefit by trying to recapture at a larger image scale. This may help deal with those depressing gradients which trouble all of us. It is possible that you don't have a sufficiently large image scale to see lots of detail and that's why your struggling to improve the image. I might be completely wrong on this but it's good to explore thoughts!

More than likely I wouldn't see much difference at an image scale range of 0.8 - 1.8 given my seeing conditions.  This image was taken with a QHY163M.  As you know I have a G3-16200 as well that I could have used at an image scale of 1.35"/px.  In retrospect it may have been better to use that camera instead, but when it comes to galaxies and fine details I'd rather be oversampled to try and recover some of the detail.



#5 elmiko

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 08:20 AM

Joel, what an awesome display of your improvement over the years! I really like the way you showed that.

Your first image in 2010 is really good. But your latest with the Ha data is amazing! It brought out those pillars of intense spewing gases! That is really cool. 

Question, if we were located on a planet in M106 and near ( I mean visually near) what would one of those jets of gas look like in the night sky? Am I correct in thinking it would look like Maybe the Lagoon Nebula?

Just curious, if any scientist out there knows the answer, please tell. 

Thanks Mike


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#6 buckeyestargazer

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:54 PM

Joel, what an awesome display of your improvement over the years! I really like the way you showed that.

Your first image in 2010 is really good. But your latest with the Ha data is amazing! It brought out those pillars of intense spewing gases! That is really cool. 

Question, if we were located on a planet in M106 and near ( I mean visually near) what would one of those jets of gas look like in the night sky? Am I correct in thinking it would look like Maybe the Lagoon Nebula?

Just curious, if any scientist out there knows the answer, please tell. 

Thanks Mike

Thanks Mike!  

I really have no idea as to the answer to your question, but I'm curious also.  Hopefully someone will chime in.


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#7 astrovienna

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:17 PM

Great work, Joel.  The Ha really adds a lot to the image.

 

Kevin


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#8 mike8888

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 05:05 AM

Fabulous detail on the galaxies. Loved expanding the image to view the faint fuzzies you captured as well. 


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