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Does this look right? 8" Celestron SCT & Revolution Imager R2

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#1 Chianzi

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 03:29 AM

So tonight, I got my first glimpse of Jupiter!  I live in north Orange County, so obviously light pollution is an issue.  Per the title of the post, I've got an 8" Celestron Evolution SCT and the Revolution Imager R2.  

 

I was able to see some of Jupiter's moons, but Jupiter looked like a blob of white.  No bands, red spot, etc.  I know from looking at other posts that I should be able to see the bands and red spot of Jupiter if I'm doing things right.  

 

Is this what I can expect from this camera?  Any tips on settings adjustments?  This is my first telescope, and probably my 8th time using it, so any tips would be appreciated.  The tip may seem basic to you, but I'm green as can be when it comes to astronomy.

 

R2SCT.jpg



#2 BinoGuy

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 07:06 AM

Congrats, and welcome to Cloudy Nights!  It looks blown out (overexposed) to me.  I had one of those cameras for a couple of months and struggled with this same issue.  Fortunately, CN is a great place with lots of smart and experienced people that are happy to assist.  I am sure some of them will drop by and immediately pinpoint the problem for you.  In the meantime, there are a LOT of options in the menus but perhaps start with Gain and Brightness and maybe I recall an exposure interval too, drop them way down individually and see if that makes a difference.



#3 Sam Danigelis

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 08:30 AM

I agree with Binoguy. I always start out with my gain and exposure dialed way up so I can see dim objects. Once I have Jupiter or Saturn centered, I dial down the gain first, then the exposure. As you go darker, you'll begin to see the bands. Once you can see the bands you'll likely need to refocus. So it's a multi-step operation.

Edited by Sam Danigelis, 26 April 2019 - 08:32 AM.

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#4 RedLionNJ

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 09:24 AM

So tonight, I got my first glimpse of Jupiter!  I live in north Orange County, so obviously light pollution is an issue.  Per the title of the post, I've got an 8" Celestron Evolution SCT and the Revolution Imager R2.  

 

I was able to see some of Jupiter's moons, but Jupiter looked like a blob of white.  No bands, red spot, etc.  I know from looking at other posts that I should be able to see the bands and red spot of Jupiter if I'm doing things right.  

 

Is this what I can expect from this camera?  Any tips on settings adjustments?  This is my first telescope, and probably my 8th time using it, so any tips would be appreciated.  The tip may seem basic to you, but I'm green as can be when it comes to astronomy.

 

 

Not quite sure what you mean by "obviously light pollution is an issue".  Light pollution is a total non-factor when viewing or imaging Jupiter.

 

You'll likely want to increase the viewing scale on your setup - not sure if you're using a barlow or eyepiece projection, but you want Jupiter to cover at least 200 pixels on the display for optimum viewing.

 

That in itself will result in the light being spread over a wider area, so the brightness will diminish slightly. Probably not enough to see detail, though. For that, you'll need to reduce exposure time and/or gain, as mentioned by others, above.

 

As also mentioned, fine focus requires a ton of patience, particularly if you have the stock focusing mechanism on your SCT.

 

Collimation should also be verified and tweaked, if necessary.

 

And the scope should be at ambient temperature, inside and out.

 

The difference between applying all of the above and skipping even one of them can be INCREDIBLE. This cannot be exaggerated.

 

And finally, you're at the mercy of the stability of the atmosphere - some nights/hours/minutes will be better than others.

 

Keep at it, though - I like where this might go.



#5 jerahian

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 10:00 AM

Hey Chianzi, welcome to CN!!
 
+1 to what the others have already said.  I too believe you’re overexposed.  Although I do not have direct experience with the R2 imager, I have used Live Stacking in SharpCap.
 
You may already know this, but what you are doing is referred to as Electronically Assisted Astronomy, or EAA.  There is a forum here dedicated just for people engaged in EAA.  It’s under Specialty Forums > EAA Observation.

 

-Ara



#6 Gary Z

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 10:10 AM

Welcome to Cloudy nights and congrats on your astronomy purchases. 

 

First off, I want to ask that you be patient and discover your camera settings. 

 

I've found this site that may be of use to you with regard to different settings with the Revolution Camera: https://www.revoluti...m/pages/planets

 

Second, I'd also look into the Celestron F/6.3 focal reducer/corrector.  This will allow you to have a wider view and faster focal length which will require less exposure time when imaging planets and deep space objects.

 

Best wishes for more clear skies and time with your gear.

 

Gary



#7 burb scope

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 08:22 AM

Yes, the R2 settings can be a challenge!  Stray light, aperture, focal length, etc. will affect the view, and consider any published list of settings to be a SUGGESTION of where to start experimenting.

There is a Facebook group dedicated to the Revolution imager, but it is not nearly as active as this website.  Look for the "Revolution imager users Group".

Jupiter is tough because getting the moons to show up will blow out the bands.  

I suggest starting on the Moon, to help get used to things.


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#8 Stephen Kennedy

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 04:20 PM

Getting an image of Jupiter showing details in its clouds and including its moons is hard. The moons have a high albedo but so does Jupiter which due to its size is so much brighter than its moons. The dark cloud bands on Jupiter are easy to overexpose if one tries to image the moons as well. Here is my best effort using a 210 mm F/7.7 Newtonian reflector and a Canon T3 DSLR.

_MG_0549 (2).JPG

#9 bobzeq25

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 05:30 PM

Overexposed is the major problem.  All else is tweaks.



#10 Stephen Kennedy

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 08:44 PM

Overexposed is the major problem.  All else is tweaks.


The problem is that when you use the optimum exposure time to see detail in Jupiter's clouds, the moons will not be visible. If you use an exposure time that clearly shows the moons then you overexpose Jupiter itself. In the image I took I tried to use an exposure time that preserved some of the detail on Jupiter while just barely making the moons visible.

Now, the only post-processing software I have is the picture editing feature that comes with the Windows software. If I had, and knew how to use, dedicated Astronomy software I might have been able to get more of the detail on Jupiter and brighter images for the moons. When I look at the Jupiter system visually with my telescope I can clearly see the moons resolved into disks but the image shows them elongated. This might be due to the fact that the moons are moving very rapidly around Jupiter and therefore have motion relative to us that is different from Jupiter's motion from our frame of reference. It is really easier to get a good image of Solar System objects by making a video of them and processing them through Registax than it is to take a single exposure.

#11 Sam Danigelis

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 09:28 PM

As mentioned earlier, by playing around with your exposure, you can get shots of Jupiter with moons.  It's a tricky balancing act.

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  • Jupiter with her moons.jpg

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