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Zhumell Z130 First Experiences and Initial Thoughts

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#1 Traffalger1698

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 12:02 PM

So a week or so ago I got my first Telescope from High Point Scientific.  I live in Bortle 4 skies and my deck/back yard face south over a field and the closest city at my back.  So viewing in my backyard is actually pretty good.

 

I decided to pick up a Zhumell Z130 telescope because of its size, weight, and portability.  I had very much considered the AWB Onesky but ultimately decided I liked the full tube of the Z130 better.

 

When I unboxed the telescope to my surprise it was actually clear out that night.  However the moon was full so there really wasn’t much else to look at and it was REALLY bright. (I now have a 13% moon filter on its way).  Armed with a camera mount and an aging iPhone 7 I was able to, in my opinion get a couple decent shots.  For this first time amateur anyway.  I have added a link to the Imgur album so I do not violate any rules of this forum. 

 

Being a tabletop Dob I found a small but surprisingly stable outdoor table and using a lawn chair worked very well. 

 

On my second night viewing I was able to observe Mars (just a big red dot right now with the 10mm Kellner eyepiece), Sirius, Canis Major, Betelgeuse, and a couple satellites that flew through the frame.  The satellites were really cool and not going to lie was a WTH moment.  The wife was even surprised saying how many stars she could see.  I don’t think it would take too much for her to get hooked as well.

 

The Z130 came with a 10mm and a 25mm eyepiece.  The 25mm isn’t bad and I like the wider FOV but the 10mm has very poor eye relief.  It is usable but I feel like my eye is literally almost touching it.  I have ordered a set of “Gold Line” eyepieces that should arrive within the next few days.  I’m getting a 20mm in that set but I think eventually I might want a better wide field eyepiece.  Does anyone have any suggestions that wont break the bank right off the bat?

 

I am quite happy I started small with the Z130, I did not want to start too big and be frustrated because I couldn’t move it right or find stuff etc.  With luck I’ll be able to add a second 8”-10” Dob next year in time for Mars to be a lot closer.  I can’t see that having a small portable telescope and a larger better one would be bad at all.
 

This morning as I was leaving for work (05:00) Jupiter and Saturn were both taunting me.  I cannot wait to wake up early (and it not be cloudy) so I can get a look at those.  I think Its safe to say I'm hooked.

 

Gallery of my first light expierience.

 

https://imgur.com/gallery/KF9ALba

 

Thank you to all the people that helped discuss my options and helped get this far.


Edited by Traffalger1698, 26 April 2019 - 12:03 PM.

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#2 clearwaterdave

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 12:17 PM

Good first scope.,I like my Onesky alot.,Open clusters are a treat with these.,A 32mm plossl will give you the widest fov you can get.,as will a 68*24mm ep..cheers.,


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#3 Traffalger1698

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 12:22 PM

Good first scope.,I like my Onesky alot.,Open clusters are a treat with these.,A 32mm plossl will give you the widest fov you can get.,as will a 68*24mm ep..cheers.,

Thanks thats almost exactly the same recomendation as a post I made over on Reddit.  Thanks I am excited to be here.


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#4 Tony Flanders

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 03:55 PM

One of the decent 8-24 zooms goes very well with that scope. They have ample eye relief at all focal lengths, and fairly wide apparent fields of view at the 8-mm end. Most of the cheaper ones have narrow fields of view at 24 mm, but your stock eyepiece covers that focal length very well indeed.

 

You do need something with a focal length around 5 mm to exploit the telescope's planetary capabilities. A Barlow lens can be very useful in achieving that.


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#5 Traffalger1698

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 04:14 PM

One of the decent 8-24 zooms goes very well with that scope. They have ample eye relief at all focal lengths, and fairly wide apparent fields of view at the 8-mm end. Most of the cheaper ones have narrow fields of view at 24 mm, but your stock eyepiece covers that focal length very well indeed.

 

You do need something with a focal length around 5 mm to exploit the telescope's planetary capabilities. A Barlow lens can be very useful in achieving that.

Thanks I'll look at that as well.  My "Gold Line" 6mm eyepiece was delivered this afternoon.  Still Considering a Barlow as well. 


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#6 aeajr

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 05:27 PM

snip...

 

I am quite happy I started small with the Z130, I did not want to start too big and be frustrated because I couldn’t move it right or find stuff etc.  With luck I’ll be able to add a second 8”-10” Dob next year in time for Mars to be a lot closer.  I can’t see that having a small portable telescope and a larger better one would be bad at all.
 

This morning as I was leaving for work (05:00) Jupiter and Saturn were both taunting me.  I cannot wait to wake up early (and it not be cloudy) so I can get a look at those.  I think Its safe to say I'm hooked.

 

Gallery of my first light expierience.

 

https://imgur.com/gallery/KF9ALba

 

Thank you to all the people that helped discuss my options and helped get this far.

Thanks for sharing your first experience with us.    We all enjoy a first light post.

 

As for multple scopes, it is the normal progression.  Typically you will end up with:

 

  • Binoculars
  • Grab and Go (you have that) 
  • Light bucket - typically 8" or larger.

Each has its place and you will make use of them all.    I now have six, though one is going up for sale and one is out on loan.

 

I just bought 4 used binoculars that I can use as handouts for outreach events. Got them from Goodwill for a great price.  I have two others that are hand outs and then two that are my "good" binoculars.

 

As for eyepieces, I have never used the Goldline so don't know anything about them.

 

Here are the eyepieces I usually recommend.

 

Eyepiece Review by price point

https://telescopicwa...cope-eyepieces/

 

 

Lower Cost Single FL eyepieces – for your Medium to high power magnifications.

AT Paradigm line 60 degree AFOV.   I don’t have these but I read so many good reports about them, especially in scopes of F5 or higher focal ratios.
The Agena Astro Dual ED are the same eyepieces under a different label.
https://www.astronom...pieces_c52.aspx

https://www.cloudyni...s/?hl=+paradigm

 

 

Meade 82 degree
https://www.astronom...pieces_c75.aspx

 

Explore Scientific 68 degree and 82 degree line.  I have two of the 82 degree and really like them.  Many reports compare these favorably with the premium eyepieces.

https://agenaastro.c...scientific.html

 

 

Meade 82 vs. ES 82

https://www.cloudyni...e-82-eyepieces/

 

 

Zoom Eyepieces

 

Lower cost zoom – Celestron 8-24 – This was my first zoom.  Works well at the price and a good way to test your interest in zooms. $66
Higher priced Zoom – Baader Hyperion 8-24 mm – My main eyepiece in my Orion XT8i – $290
https://agenaastro.c...lanetarium.html

 

 

Celestron Zoom eyepiece review

https://telescopicwa...yepiece-review/

 

 

Baader Hyperion Mark IV Zoom review   - The current model  -

https://astronomycon...ox-january-2018


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#7 Tony Flanders

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Posted 27 April 2019 - 06:07 AM

I might say that while the stock 10-mm eyepiece supplied with this scope has pretty short eye relief, I do find it eminently usable. In other regards, the eyepiece is just fine optically. And I do appreciate the simplicity, small size, and light weight of both the 25- and 10-mm eyepieces. Once you start looking at wide-field eyepieces with long eye relief, you will be considering units that bulk and weigh three or four times as much as the 25 and 10 combined. Balance while switching eyepieces can start to be an issue.



#8 Traffalger1698

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Posted 27 April 2019 - 06:10 AM

Thanks for sharing your first experience with us.    We all enjoy a first light post.

 

As for multple scopes, it is the normal progression.  Typically you will end up with:

 

  • Binoculars
  • Grab and Go (you have that) 
  • Light bucket - typically 8" or larger.

Each has its place and you will make use of them all.    I now have six, though one is going up for sale and one is out on loan.

 

I just bought 4 used binoculars that I can use as handouts for outreach events. Got them from Goodwill for a great price.  I have two others that are hand outs and then two that are my "good" binoculars.

 

As for eyepieces, I have never used the Goldline so don't know anything about them.

 

Here are the eyepieces I usually recommend.... 

 

I have a decent pair of binoculars as well they are only 10x50 but they work well enough.  :)

 

the write up on the eyepieces is great thank you, I'll check that out tomorrow. 


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#9 aeajr

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Posted 27 April 2019 - 09:53 PM

10X50 binoculars are perfect. That is what I used to get started in astronomy and what I continue to use as my primary astronomy binoculars.   I also have 15X70s.



#10 Traffalger1698

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 08:07 AM

10X50 binoculars a perfect. That is what I used to get started in astronomy and what I continue to use as my primary astronomy binoculars.   I also have 15X70s.

I just picked up a pair of Vortex Viper HD 10x50.  They are phenominal so far! 

 

This morning (before work did not have time to pull the telescope out) I was able to see Jupiter and a couple moons.  Looked at Saturn to and I swear it isn't quite round. Not sure if thats just my mind playing tricks on me because I know it SHOULDN'T be exactly round, or I actually am seeing a slight oval. 

 

My 6mm "Gold Line" came in yesterday, hopefully tomorrow morning it will be clear so I can test it out. 


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#11 aeajr

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 08:42 AM

As we learn about observing and the objects we observe we do start to see things we would have overlooked before.   You noticed that Saturn was not quite round.  In 10X50s I get that too.

 

While there are a million things to see up there, I have favorites which I visit again and again.  Each time I seem to notice something new, some little detail I didn't see before.   Sometimes this is due to atmospheric conditions.  Or maybe it is the result of some research I have done to learn about this target.

 

You are on the start of a wonderful journey.    So much to see and to learn and enjoy.   You have the first two optical tools you will want to have, binoculars and a grab and go scope.  Enjoy them and explore with them.

 

At some point you will catch a disease called aperture fever.  You will want a telescope with a larger aperture that will capture more light so you can see more detail in your favorites and dimmer targets that escape you now.  But resist for as long as you can.  Lean to see and to notice with what you have.

 

If you would like to learn about observing, I invite you to join our little community of observers, at the link below.  Some have only binoculars and some have scopes like yours. And some have larger scopes.  But we help each other and share our experiences.

 

I think you will enjoy it.   The discussion is long. I suggest you read the first 5 pages as it will feel familiar to you.  Then skip to the last 5 and you will understand what we are all about.   Come, join us.

 

A Newbies Observation log – come join me – Cloudy Nights
http://www.cloudynig...on-log-join-me/


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#12 Traffalger1698

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 09:36 AM

One of the decent 8-24 zooms goes very well with that scope. They have ample eye relief at all focal lengths, and fairly wide apparent fields of view at the 8-mm end. Most of the cheaper ones have narrow fields of view at 24 mm, but your stock eyepiece covers that focal length very well indeed.

 

You do need something with a focal length around 5 mm to exploit the telescope's planetary capabilities. A Barlow lens can be very useful in achieving that.

I have a 6mm "Gold Line" that I will be trying out as soon as it clears up.  I've read that depending on atmosphere conditions it may be tough to go below that.  I also have a 9mm "Gold Line" so I guess a 2x barlow would give me 3mm or 4.5mm. Think that would even be useful due to atmospheric conditions?


Edited by Traffalger1698, 28 April 2019 - 09:50 AM.


#13 tamara6

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 06:57 PM

I got a Zhumell Z130 about a month ago, and I've really only been able to use it about 4 or 5 times, due to clouds (it is funny, but I'd never really noticed how cloudy/hazy it is almost every night).

 

Mine was a birthday present from my husband, and my daughter gave me a 2x Barlow and a 6mm Svbony eyepiece.  The Svbony I've used only once.  It was nice to look through, and did give a larger image than the 10mm that comes with the scope.  But it felt like the 10mm lens gave a sharper image.  I'm hoping to get one of the 8-22 zooms for Christmas.

 

Our first night out we basically only saw the moon and the Orion Nebula.  But, man, that was awesome.  And the trapezium!  That was what really got us excited.   I'm really looking forward to warmer weather, and (hopefully) clearer skies as spring turns to summer.  I'm sort of dreaming of long summer evenings enjoying the telescope.

 

Can I ask what phone adapter you got?  I'd like one, myself, and I have an iPhone 7.


Edited by tamara6, 28 April 2019 - 06:58 PM.

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#14 Traffalger1698

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 10:51 PM

I got a Zhumell Z130 about a month ago, and I've really only been able to use it about 4 or 5 times, due to clouds (it is funny, but I'd never really noticed how cloudy/hazy it is almost every night).

Mine was a birthday present from my husband, and my daughter gave me a 2x Barlow and a 6mm Svbony eyepiece. The Svbony I've used only once. It was nice to look through, and did give a larger image than the 10mm that comes with the scope. But it felt like the 10mm lens gave a sharper image. I'm hoping to get one of the 8-22 zooms for Christmas.

Our first night out we basically only saw the moon and the Orion Nebula. But, man, that was awesome. And the trapezium! That was what really got us excited. I'm really looking forward to warmer weather, and (hopefully) clearer skies as spring turns to summer. I'm sort of dreaming of long summer evenings enjoying the telescope.

Can I ask what phone adapter you got? I'd like one, myself, and I have an iPhone 7.

yea it always seems to be cloudy unless I'm leaving for work at 5 in the morning then its clear as a bell and Jupiter and Saturn are taunting me!

I might wait a bit on the Barlow as I have the exact same 6mm SVBONY eyepiece. I might see how everyhting looks before I try to see if i want to try and Barlow it or get a smaller 3-4mm eyepiece. I have not been able to check out any nebula yet so your lucky there. (looks like it might be clear in a week or so tho lol who knows but fingers crossed.)

as for the camera mount this is the one I got:
https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It is metal and heavier than I thought it might be. There is a plastic option for a bit less money, however I was worried about ease of breaking. I would highly recommend a red light because it is a bugger to try and get lined up to the eyepiece in the dark.

I am looking forward to summer as well, but sadly the night time in summer is quite short. Not going to lie there is a part of me that is looking forward to the longer nights of fall and winter.

Edited by Traffalger1698, 28 April 2019 - 11:26 PM.


#15 Sky Muse

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 04:15 AM

This is the best 32mm Plossl going.  It sells out frequently...

 

https://agenaastro.c...l-eyepiece.html

 

Don't consider a 40mm.  The 32mm will give a power of 20x, and binocular-like.  Your telescope has a focal-length of 650mm...

 

650mm ÷ 32mm = 20x

 

The 32mm would provide the largest view of the sky, for deep-sky vistas like the star-studded fields of the Milky Way, and others; also for hunting the smaller objects, then to ramp up the power for a closer look.  I would suggest the 32mm over a pair of binoculars.  Also, consider the Meade 8-24 zoom instead of the Celestron, but only if you're curious about that type of eyepiece.  

 

Your new 6mm...

 

650mm ÷ 6mm = 108x

 

A 5" aperture is capable of up to 250x, particularly when viewing the moon at a phase less than full.  A barlow can wait for now, but keep in mind that a barlow is inserted between your eye and the object that you're observing, as well as an eyepiece, so invest a bit in one when the time comes.  As long as they're not lost or stolen, a particular eyepiece, a specific barlow and other accessories only have to be acquired once, and will last a lifetime.  They also have the advantage of being used with other telescopes that may be had in future, on and on.

 

In addition, learning how to collimate your Newtonian, close to perfection, will reap great rewards.  The higher in power you go, the more critical the collimation must be, and for sharp and pleasing images.  Then, if an object is difficult to view at the moment due to the atmosphere, that will require patience in waiting for the seeing to steady.  The object may sharpen up only for a few seconds, but it will knock your socks off when it happens.  Once, with my 6" f/5 Newtonian, I saw Jupiter's surface for those few fleeting moments, and every last detail the planet had to offer at the time.  The planet appeared as if during a NASA broadcast on an old-style colour television; glorious. 


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#16 Traffalger1698

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 08:34 AM

This is the best 32mm Plossl going. It sells out frequently...

https://agenaastro.c...l-eyepiece.html

Don't consider a 40mm. The 32mm will give a power of 20x, and binocular-like. Your telescope has a focal-length of 650mm...

650mm ÷ 32mm = 20x

The 32mm would provide the largest view of the sky, for deep-sky vistas like the star-studded fields of the Milky Way, and others; also for hunting the smaller objects, then to ramp up the power for a closer look. I would suggest the 32mm over a pair of binoculars. Also, consider the Meade 8-24 zoom instead of the Celestron, but only if you're curious about that type of eyepiece.

Your new 6mm...

650mm ÷ 6mm = 108x

A 5" aperture is capable of up to 250x, particularly when viewing the moon at a phase less than full. A barlow can wait for now, but keep in mind that a barlow is inserted between your eye and the object that you're observing, as well as an eyepiece, so invest a bit in one when the time comes. As long as they're not lost or stolen, a particular eyepiece, a specific barlow and other accessories only have to be acquired once, and will last a lifetime. They also have the advantage of being used with other telescopes that may be had in future, on and on.

In addition, learning how to collimate your Newtonian, close to perfection, will reap great rewards. The higher in power you go, the more critical the collimation must be, and for sharp and pleasing images. Then, if an object is difficult to view at the moment due to the atmosphere, that will require patience in waiting for the seeing to steady. The object may sharpen up only for a few seconds, but it will knock your socks off when it happens. Once, with my 6" f/5 Newtonian, I saw Jupiter's surface for those few fleeting moments, and every last detail the planet had to offer at the time. The planet appeared as if during a NASA broadcast on an old-style colour television; glorious.

Thank you for the suggestion and ironically there is a used one in the classifieds section that was added last night. (Seen it when I opened my browser back up.) Incidentally I picked up a Meade 4000 32mm Plossl yesterday. I guess I should have had some more patience. The GSO one looks very nice.

Obviously if time permits the telescope would be a better choice than binoculars but everything has a time and place. My binoculars will likely get use more when there is more than just me or time does not permit taking the telescope out.

What are your thoughts on the GSO Barlow?

https://agenaastro.c...arlow-lens.html

Edited by Traffalger1698, 29 April 2019 - 09:02 AM.


#17 aeajr

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 09:10 AM

Stick with the Meade Plossl.  They are excellent.  However the GSOs are good too.  Many branded eyepieces are actually GSO.

 

I agree about the 40.   No benefit there.  Stay with the 32 as your low power wide view eyepiece. 

 

I have two GSO barlows.  Very happy with them. 

 

My binoculars get lots of sky time, even when I have a telescope set-up.    When I go to outreach I bring some cheap binoculars as handouts for people to use and then return to the box.


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#18 Traffalger1698

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 10:58 AM

Stick with the Meade Plossl.  They are excellent.  However the GSOs are good too.  Many branded eyepieces are actually GSO.

 

I agree about the 40.   No benefit there.  Stay with the 32 as your low power wide view eyepiece. 

 

I have two GSO barlows.  Very happy with them. 

 

My binoculars get lots of sky time, even when I have a telescope set-up.    When I go to outreach I bring some cheap binoculars as handouts for people to use and then return to the box.

I was def thinking on trying it out before I tried anything else.  Both the Meade and the GSO looked very similar as it was.  Both seem to be reviewed highly.  

 

Because I already have a 6mm and a 9mm which would be a better idea, a 4mm standard Eyepiece or a 2x Barlow?  I see lots of debate from both sides of the Pro and Non Barlow crowds.  


Edited by Traffalger1698, 29 April 2019 - 11:01 AM.

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#19 aeajr

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 05:08 PM

The first benefit of getting a barlow is that is can be used with all of your eyepieces creating new magnification options.  So one purchase creates many options. 

 

The second benefit is eye relief.   Rather than getting a 4 mm eyepiece with very short eye relief you can use an 8 mm that has longer eye relief.

 

A barlow is like an adjustable wrench, you use it when you don't have the correct wrench size.   

 

Let's look at this two ways, these are just arbitrary focal lengths.  Not saying you need these. 

 

32

16 (32 with 2X barlow)

12

  8

  6 (barlow)

  5

  4 (barlow)

2.5 (barlow)

 

4 and 2.5 may be mags that you can rarely reach, so they may not justify an eyepiece.  6 is a bonus, most of the time  you will likely use the 5.   And a 6, 4 and 2.5 mm eyepiece may have very short eye relief.

 

Instead of buying 3 more expensive eyepieces with longer eye relief, 6, 4, 2.5.  Get 12, 8 and 5 mm of this "better" class with longer eye relief and let the barlow double duty them.   If you find you are using 4 and 2.5 a lot you may wish to add actual eyepieces later.

 

Your normal observing set will likely be, 32, 12, 8 and 5.   You only reach for the barlow when you need that intermediate 16 or 6, or when you have exceptional conditions where the 4  or 2.5 can be used.

 

So a barlow is not necessarily something you will use every night.  It fills in the gaps or extends the range at a very low cost.  Of course if you have plenty of budget, just buy better eyepieces with plenty of eye relief and skip the barlow.

 

Telescope Eyepieces
https://telescopicwa...cope-eyepieces/

 

Selecting an Eyepiece - Orion telescope
This is a very general discussion of eyepieces and why there are a variety of designs
https://www.youtube....h?v=m7u9Q5hV7yc

 

I have 1.5/2X and 2.5X barlows in my active eyepiece set.   I also have a 3X in the storage box that I rarely use, but it was cheap.



#20 Traffalger1698

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 10:47 PM

The first benefit of getting a barlow is that is can be used with all of your eyepieces creating new magnification options.  So one purchase creates many options. 

 

The second benefit is eye relief.   Rather than getting a 4 mm eyepiece with very short eye relief you can use an 8 mm that has longer eye relief.

 

A barlow is like an adjustable wrench, you use it when you don't have the correct wrench size.....

 

 

I guess when you put it like that it doesn't make sense NOT to have one.  Is there any specifically you would recommend? 

 

Is something like either of these any good?

 

https://www.amazon.c...L/dp/B014ZTKQ6O

 

https://www.amazon.c...sk_ql_qh_dp_hza


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#21 aeajr

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 11:01 PM

All depends on your budget.  Barlows can be $10 and they can be $100.   But if  you are trying to keep the cost down I think I would go with the GSO barlow you listed. 

 

That one has a neat feature in that you can remove the barlow element and put it directly on the eyepiece for 1.5X.  Now that is probably not going to be something you would use often but if you have a zoom eyepiece, then that feature would be very useful.

 

In fact I do that with my GSO 2X 2" barlow.  I have the element attached to the 2" adapter of my Baader zoom.  Does a good job of matching the zoom's magnification to the telescope for which I use it.

 

Here is the write-up I did on that.

 

=================================

Matching the Baader Hyperion 8-24 zoom to my Dob

 

I have the BHZ for my 8", 1200 mm FL Dob. It is now my primary eyepiece for this scope.  I now have three ranges where I use this zoom

  •  
  • 8-24 mm - 50 to 150X
  • 16-5.3 mm - 75 to 225X
  • 12-4 mm - 100 to 300X

Using this 2" GSO 2X ED barlow, I get 2X.  But I can remove the barlow element and use it as 1.5X by directly attaching it to a 2" eyepiece or the 2" adapter that comes with the BHZ. 
https://agenaastro.c...arlow-lens.html

 

This results in the BHZ operating as a 16 to 5.33 zoom. For me that results in 75X to 225X which is a perfect range for my scope as I can rarely get over 220X.  Even my single FL 82 degree eyepieces stop at 5.5 mm as I can rarely go above that so I would barlow above that.

 

If I want to use the BHZ in the low range, 50 to 150X, or in one of my 1.25" scopes, I just take it out of the BHZ 2" adapter. If I want it in the mid range I put the BHZ into its 2" adapter. If I want to use it in the high range, 100 to 300X, I put the element back on the GSO barlow for 2X,  or I use my 1.25" 2X barlow.

 

Comparing the BHZ image with the GSO element to my ES 82 8.8 and 6.7 and my Meade 82 5.5, I find the image comparable, but of course not as wide. I am no eyepiece expert but, but most of the time I stay with the BHZ + 1.5X. I love those 82 degree eyepieces but rarely use them anymore unless I need that wide view, which is not often.

 

Naturally this barlow allows me to barlow my 2" eyepieces at 1.5X or 2X, which is why I purchased this barlow.  But the BHZ 2” adapter +1.5X element gives me a 1.5X barlow for my 1.25" eyepieces too for a bit more flexibility.

 

I now store the BHZ with the 1.5X element attached. I open each session with my 2" 38 mm 70 degree /31.5X and/or my 20 mm 82 degree 60X eyepieces. Then I go to the zoom for anything 75X and above.  Works really well. 

 

Love the Baader Hyperion zoom and now it is an even better match for my Dob.


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#22 Traffalger1698

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 11:33 PM

All depends on your budget.  Barlows can be $10 and they can be $100.   But if  you are trying to keep the cost down I think I would go with the GSO barlow you listed. 

 

That one has a neat feature in that you can remove the barlow element and put it directly on the eyepiece for 1.5X.  Now that is probably not going to be something you would use often but if you have a zoom eyepiece, then that feature would be very useful.

 

In fact I do that with my GSO 2X 2" barlow.  I have the element attached to the 2" adapter of my Baader zoom.  Does a good job of matching the zoom's magnification to the telescope for which I use it.

You have no Idea how appreciative I am of the advice and chat back and forth.  Yes for the time being I would like to try to keep my cost relatively down.  At least until I completely get the bug.  At least that way I should get a general feel of what kinds of things I do like/want to upgrade. I've got the GSO Barlow saved so if/when I decide to try It I can just grab it.  


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#23 aeajr

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 07:39 AM

You may find something useful in these. 

 

How to use a Planisphere: A beginner’s Guide
https://telescopicwa...se-planisphere/

 

How to Use a Telescope:  First Time User’s Guide
https://telescopicwa...ope-user-guide/



#24 Sky Muse

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 09:02 AM

Thank you for the suggestion and ironically there is a used one in the classifieds section that was added last night. (Seen it when I opened my browser back up.) Incidentally I picked up a Meade 4000 32mm Plossl yesterday. I guess I should have had some more patience. The GSO one looks very nice.

Obviously if time permits the telescope would be a better choice than binoculars but everything has a time and place. My binoculars will likely get use more when there is more than just me or time does not permit taking the telescope out.

What are your thoughts on the GSO Barlow?

https://agenaastro.c...arlow-lens.html

The GSO barlow, as another stated, enables you to remove the lens-assembly for a 1.5x multiplier.  However, I have read of one instance where a user had dropped that assembly after having removed it from the barlow's body.  One or both lenses cracked and the barlow became a brick as a result; fyi.  Otherwise, GSO produces what I feel to be above-average products, save achromatic refractors which they do not make any longer as far as I know.

 

There will come a time, quite a few times, when you'll want to push the telescope for all it's got, and in wanting the closest look at an object or feature of same possible.  That will require a 3x barlow, and a 9mm and a 12mm eyepiece.  Such would give you a simulated 3mm and 4mm, and for powers of 217x and 163x, respectively.  At the same you can enjoy the larger eye-lenses and greater eye-relief of the 9mm and 12mm eyepieces, yet at those higher, simulated powers.  The collimation will need to be spot-on for those higher powers.

 

A 3x barlow, for example... http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_eba3.htm

 

Keep in mind that it's just a one-time acquisition.  A 5" f/5 Newtonian is configured primarily for low-to-medium powers, but a barlow will unlock the Easter eggs within.

 

Now, many will tell you that you won't have much use for the higher and highest powers, "Empty magnification!" they'll exclaim and howl, but a telescope is for seeing faraway objects up close in the first place; else, binoculars would serve.  Then, if you heed them, if you don't try, you'll miss out on what you might've seen instead.  

 

A telescope, the eyepieces, the barlow, and other elements placed into the light-path, between your eye and an object in the sky, do have to work harder as you go up in power, therefore you want the figurements and polishings of the lenses and mirrors of the equipment to be as top-notch as is reasonably possible, and again, the telescope itself well-collimated, but that doesn't always have to mean high prices.


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#25 Traffalger1698

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 08:49 AM

So with the warmer months coming up that means dew and moisture could become a problem. My question is when I acclimate the telescope (bringing from inside climate controlled to outside) how should I go about that?

Maybe bring it into the garage first to start acclimating it? Would bringing it outside and cover it somehow? Some telescopes I see covers for but I haven’t really seen anything like that for this scope.

Likewise storing it? Right now I’ve kept it in a horizontal position is that ok, or should I store it in a different configuration? Dust covers are on and the focuser is capped but would vertical be better or worse?

Any tips would be appreciated.


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