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How Bright is that Meteor - in light bulbs!

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#1 Marty0750

Marty0750

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 12:25 AM

After months of calculations and consultations I have tried to answer this question.

 

https://martins-arti...efaultvmlo.html

 

 

Topic was started here

https://www.cloudyni...x/#entry8206367

 

 

Martin



#2 MikeTahtib

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 04:50 AM

So between 1 and 10 million? (I just skimmed the article).



#3 Marty0750

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 02:08 AM

So between 1 and 10 million? (I just skimmed the article).

The model works best for meteoroids only up to about 1kg. I suspect  at much larger masses and zenith distances the figures are probably increasingly divergent from reality. So I wouldn't say use this model for something like a dinosaur extinctor class meteoroid 

 

If anyone can improve on the modelling please feel free to throw your cards in the ring.

 

Martin




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