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#1 TerokNor

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 02:42 PM

Hello everyone,
 
I'm a absolute beginner in astronomy - I used to be fascinated by it when I was a kid, but circumstances didn't allow for me to pursue that hobby, and I've only recently had the chance to get back into it. It has become apparent that I have no idea what I'm doing, so I'm here to ask for advice. Here's a quick rundown of the situation:
 
My interest came back recently after attending an astronomy event organized by a university. Some people from the local astronomy association brought their telescopes and made them available for everyone attending the event, they even let us try to take photos (that's where my avatar is from!). It was a lot of fun. Unfortunately, I didn't ask as many questions as I would have liked, because there were a lot of people waiting to try the telescopes and I didn't want to be a bother. This association also organizes its own events, but apparently it costs a significant amount of money to become a member (only members can attend), so I think first I should figure out if this is for me.
 
I am trying to decide if it would be worth it to get a telescope and begin learning on my own. I used to have a pair of binoculars (don't remember what kind), mostly for looking at the moon and whatever constellations I could identify. I don't have these anymore, and I'm not considering getting new ones because now it would be difficult for me to hold them up for any period of time. So I would rather get a telescope. I have a limited budget and I wouldn't want to go too much over ~100€. I think I would rather get a basic telescope now and upgrade later if I want to, than spend a lot of money now only to find out I don't really enjoy this that much. In that price range, I've seen the Orion SkyScanner 100mm recommended in a few different places (Amazon here has it for 109,99€). Any opinions on this telescope or any others in this range? Should I just try to save more or is this okay for a beginner? Is it a good idea to buy from Amazon or should I be looking at specialized shops?
 
Unfortunately, most of the time I would be observing in an area has a lot of light pollution - the Clear Outside app tells me it is Bortle 8. Would it be possible to see anything worthwhile from here? Frankly, I think if I could see some planets I would already be pretty happy. I also spend about one month a year somewhere else that according to Clear Outside is Bortle 4, which is decent if I understand the scale correctly. But I'm not sure if it's worth it to get a telescope I can only use for a month every year.
 
Sorry for the wall of text! I appreciate any advice or comments (and if I need telling off for saying something silly, please be gentle :P)


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#2 JGass

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 03:06 PM

I was going to suggest the Meade Infinity 80 refractor, or the Skywatcher Heritage 130p, but Amazon.es doesn't list the former, and they sell the latter for more than 200 Euros.

 

There is the Meade Adventure Scope 80

which is the same telescope section as the Infinity 80, but on a cheaper mount.  It is still over 165 Euros. 

This sort of telescope is better for low magnification views, and not as good for viewing the planets or the Moon.

 

If you can make friends with a local amateur astronomer who already has a telescope, that might give you a chance to better learn about telescopes, and the types of objects you most enjoy observing.  That would be valuable knowledge to have, before purchasing a telescope.

 

In the USA, there are a number of places to purchase used telescopes.  I don't know what the similar places are in Europe, and in Spain, in particular.  But, used telescopes can be purchased more cheaply than new.  Without some guidance, though, it would be easy to make a poor choice when buying a used telescope.



#3 lee14

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 03:17 PM

Fortunately, the planets are unaffected by light pollution. As is the moon. I would do some reading before deciding on a scope, determining what you would like to observe will influence your choice of equipment.

 

Lee



#4 aeajr

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 03:45 PM

Hello everyone,

snip...

 
I am trying to decide if it would be worth it to get a telescope and begin learning on my own. I used to have a pair of binoculars (don't remember what kind), mostly for looking at the moon and whatever constellations I could identify. I don't have these anymore, and I'm not considering getting new ones because now it would be difficult for me to hold them up for any period of time. So I would rather get a telescope. I have a limited budget and I wouldn't want to go too much over ~100€. I think I would rather get a basic telescope now and upgrade later if I want to, than spend a lot of money now only to find out I don't really enjoy this that much. In that price range, I've seen the Orion SkyScanner 100mm recommended in a few different places (Amazon here has it for 109,99€). Any opinions on this telescope or any others in this range? Should I just try to save more or is this okay for a beginner? Is it a good idea to buy from Amazon or should I be looking at specialized shops?

 
Welcome to Cloudy Nights.   We were all in the same situation at some point.
 
Here is a review I wrote on the Orion SkyScanner 100.  I own this scope.
 
SkyScanner 100
https://telescopicwa...r-100mm-review/

 

This may also be helpful.

 

How Much Does a First Telescope Cost?
https://telescopicwa...telescope-cost/
 

I buy plenty of astronomy stuff from Amazon.  But I also deal with the specialized sites like www.telescope.com and www.highpointscientific.com, www.astronomics.com .   But those are mostly USA sites as far as I know.   You need to evaluate what is available in your country. 
 
And, like most hobbies, the more you spend, the more capability you get.  The SkyScanner 100, and other options in that price range are the very bottom of the acceptable range.   If you could double or triple your budget you would have a much better set of options. 

 

Unfortunately, most of the time I would be observing in an area has a lot of light pollution - the Clear Outside app tells me it is Bortle 8. Would it be possible to see anything worthwhile from here? Frankly, I think if I could see some planets I would already be pretty happy. I also spend about one month a year somewhere else that according to Clear Outside is Bortle 4, which is decent if I understand the scale correctly. But I'm not sure if it's worth it to get a telescope I can only use for a month every year.
 
Sorry for the wall of text! I appreciate any advice or comments (and if I need telling off for saying something silly, please be gentle tongue2.gif)



My home observing site is just outside New York City and also a Bortle 8 location.  There is plenty to be seen, even with this much light pollution.  It is really a matter of picking your targets carefully.   Galaxies and most nebula are out.  Open star clusters, double stars, planets and the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn work very well. Mars, Venus and Mercury are also visible but you won't see any real detail. 

 

When  you got to a Bortle 4 location then you can try for galaxies, nebula and globular clusters.

 

Light Pollution

https://telescopicwa...ight-pollution/

 

 

The first two telescopes listed are low cost telescopes in your stated price range.   You named one of them. 

 

 

Meade Instruments 209003 Infinity 70 AZ Refractor Telescope - About 13 pounds – $80
70 mm Includes finder scope, 2 eyepieces and a barlow lens that doubles the mag of each eyepiece.
http://www.amazon.co...cope under $200
Video
https://www.youtube....h?v=ck0MQZiSc9Y
Discussion about what can be seen with a 70 mm refractor. Remember that light pollution has a significant influence on what can be seen.
https://www.cloudyni...actor/?hl=+70mm

 

 

Orion SkyScanner 100mm TableTop Reflector Telescope - 6.2 pounds – $110
Optimized for under 100X wide view
Includes 2 eyepieces and a finder scope.
Can also be mounted on a camera tripod or any mount with a dovetail. 
Consider adding a  Celestron 8-24 zoom or a 14-16 mm Plossl and 3X barlow in the future.
http://www.telescope...25/p/102007.uts

 

The SkyScanner 100 kit is a better value for $30 more – adds Planisphere, moon filter, Moon Map 260 and Exploring the Cosmos observing guide
https://www.telescop...ASADEgJXuPD_BwE
Video
https://www.youtube....h?v=-BEzRibaMds
https://www.youtube....h?v=NihZIw8f1-o
Product reviews - SkyScanner 100
https://telescopicwa...r-100mm-review/
http://www.skyandtel...opes-review.pdf
https://www.youtube....m0UWGppOq4&t=9s

 

 

These telescopes are above your price range but have greater capability.  I don't know what is available in Spain and I have no idea what prices would be in Euros. 

 

Meade Lightbridege Mini 130 – $175 – 14 pounds
Tabletop solid tube Dobsonian includes finder scope and 2 eyepieces.
Consider adding a 2X barlow in the future
https://www.amazon.c...ade Lightbridge
Video
https://www.youtube....h?v=xuIwEiHVMVI

 

Super Simple Tabletop telescope stand
https://www.youtube....h?v=HsGD9mU8cR0
http://www.eyesonthe...eTripod2x4.aspx

 

 

Meade Infinity 90mm Altazimuth Refractor Telescope - 600 mm FL - About 12 pounds $189
Received Sky and Telescope Innovative Astronomy Gear in Jan 2016. 
Includes slow motion controls, finder scope, 3 eyepieces and a 2X barlow for 6 magnifications.
https://www.amazon.c...inity+90mm&th=1
Video
https://www.youtube....h?v=FniHZOPwzYI
https://www.youtube....h?v=0mfGjiT_PPc
Product review
http://www.skyandtel...ds/3-scopes.pdf

 

 

Meade Instruments Infinity 102 AZ Refractor Telescope - About 14 pounds – $229

Includes 3 eyepieces and a 2X barlow and slow motion controls.  Gets many great reviews
https://www.amazon.c...02 AZ Refractor
Detailed Product Review
https://www.meade.co...nfinity-102-az/


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#5 sg6

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 03:58 PM

I suggest that the places to look as TS Optics Astroshop.eu and Bresser.

 

Bresser

TS Optics

Astroshop

 

You are going to get told that you need every one of the 3 options and in just about every size shape and form that exists.

 

My preference is a refractor and I have a 102mm 600mm focal length Bresser. Does a good all round job, and yes there is some CA.

 

They do a 90/900 (lots do these) but that is a good all round scope, guess about €140 area.

Not sure of the mount and that is more relevant then the scope in many instances.

 

Bresser do this Bresser 80/640 which seems a fair idea. Again mount may be shaky.

 

Budget for 2 or 3 eyepieces and please avoid the idea of high magnifications.


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#6 cuzimthedad

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 12:38 AM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights TerokNor!



#7 Carlos Flores

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 01:44 AM

Welcome TerokNor!

 

The 100€ is -in my opinion- a tight budget for a new telescope and certainly what you would buy can risk the hobby (under average optics, shaky tripod and regular eyepieces). Instead, i suggest to get a binocular. With the 100€ you can buy a 10x50 binocular which will help you to start the hobby, know the sky and by the time fill the time while you save for a telescope. 

 

If you are still thinking in the telescope, I would suggest to take a look on the second hand market. fortunately in Europe there are plenty of second hand telescopes, many in good condition. but you need to inspect them in person.

 

Please let us know what you decided. If you are in Spain, there are many astro-enthusiast and clubs who can also advise you without membership.

 

Saludos Cordiales / Clear skies

 

Carlos



#8 SeattleScott

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:46 AM

I agree 100 euros isn’t enough. The cost of entry is higher than that. Buying a 70mm department store refractor to see if you are interested in stargazing is like buying a tricycle to see if you are interested in mountain biking. You are setting yourself up for failure, and wasting 100 euros. Binos would be better and you could get use out of them looking at birds and stuff too. Hard to do serious stargazing with binos but at least you can get decent ones for 100 euros.

Scott

#9 Waddensky

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 07:39 AM

Hi TerokNor, and welcome! Nice to see that you're bitten by the stargazing bug again.

 

It suprises me that association membership is so expensive. Maybe there are other organisations in your neighbourhood you can join, or perhaps a regional astronomy forum like Cloudy Nights. Here in The Netherlands there are some quite active communities organising starparties or other events. These are great opportunities to ask as many questions as you like and a chance to look through all kinds of telescopes to set your expectations right.

 

I agree with some other users that € 100 budget is a bit tight for a decent telescope. Yes, you can get fairly good binoculars in this price range to sweep the Milky Way and discover some nice clusters and brighter nebulae. If it's difficult to hold it up for a longer time, try to find a cheap monopod - this will give you a more stable view too. Unfortunately, the planets don't show much detail at these magnifications. You can see the moons of Jupiter and perhaps a hint of Saturn's rings but that's about it.

 

Maybe you can find a used small newtonian scope like this one or this one for under € 100 on the second-hand market. These scopes allow you to magnify much more than with binos and will reveal a lot of detail on the Moon and the larger planets (light pollution doesn't affect planetary observing that much, a stable atmosphere is much more important). If you are able to raise your budget a bit, a second-hand 6" or 8" dobson (like this) is a great, all-round choice that will offer you a lifetime of observing possibilities. Be aware that they are quite large and a bit inconvenient to lift and move, but as far as visual stargazing goes they are excellent.

 

Some good European webshops (there are more, of course):



#10 JohnnyBGood

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 08:59 AM

I have a bunch of small, inexpensive telescopes and have spent a lot of time outside with them happily. You can absolutely enjoy the hobby with a modest telescope, but you have to have the right mindset. Is an expensive telescope better than a cheap one? Yes, in every way. Of course it is. If it wasn't, no one would spend the money on buying one.

 

However, this is a "soap box" topic that frustrates me a lot. Many people give the impression that you cannot participate in the hobby unless you can afford to spend several thousand euros or dollars on equipment and this is completely not true. If you have patience and tolerance and are the kind of person who appreciates what you have more than fixates on what you don't have then you can be very happy with a small, cheap telescope.

 

HOWEVER...

 

1) Optics: A cheap telescope actually usually has pretty decent main optics, but they are usually smaller than the optics on an expensive scope. So, a 70mm diameter refracting lens instead of a 120mm lens or a 76mm mirror instead of a 200mm mirror. Less expensive refracting telescopes also have a (usually slight) color fringing when looking at the moon at high magnifications. More expensive scopes have either fancier glass or extra lenses to sharpen up high power images. The color fringing (one edge of the moon has a purple glow to it, the other has a red glow) really doesn't bother me at all, and is mostly only noticeable at the edges of the moon. Longer refractor telescopes (high "f" numbers, like f/10) have less of a problem with this than shorter ones (like f/5). Smaller optics also support less maximum magnification (kind of like a photograph with less resolution that looks fine when zoomed out but worse when zoomed in) and gather less light meaning you won't be able to see fainter, dimmer objects. But you can't see those in heavy light pollution anyway... so not much loss there for most of your use. Can you live with imperfect images and only, say, 140x magnification instead of 200x magnification? I can. Not everyone can.

 

2) Tripod and mount: A cheap telescope usually has a lighter duty tripod and mount. In the very worst offenders (that usually look like camera tripods and mounts with pan handles to move them around) it can make it nearly impossible to track an object (Jupiter, for instance) at high power because the mount moves too jerkily. Most "horseshoe" style mounts (even the cheap ones) are more manageable. That's also not a problem with equatorial mounts. The other issue with mounts is vibration. Most cheaper mounts take a couple seconds to stop shaking when you bump them. A nicer mount takes one second to stop shaking. A really nice mount doesn't shake at all. However, is 100 euros worth 1 second of your time? I have enough patience it doesn't bother me. Some people don't have that much patience. With some cleverness and ingenuity you can usually find ways to improve cheap mounts and tripods to make them sturdier.

 

3) Eyepieces: Cheap telescopes come with cheap eyepieces, since the eyepieces can cost as much or more than the rest of the telescope. If the scope comes with "Huygens (H or MH)" or "Ramsden (R or SR)" eyepieces then they need to be upgraded. They *can* be used but they aren't as sharp, they have small fields of view (like looking through a skinny straw), and they usually have too much magnification for the telescope so they can print things like "675x power!" on the box. The max usable magnification for a scope is 2x the diameter of the main optics, so for a 70mm scope it's 140x (some would say less). More than that and the image gets dim and grainy. Even on a big scope the atmospheric conditions usually limit your max magnification to 200x, or 300x at the absolute best (on top of a mountain in the desert). At a minimum you'll need "Kellner (K), "Super" , or "Modified Achromat (MA)" eyepieces. "Ploessl (P)" ones are better but a little bit pricier. No need for anything more expensive than that.The better eyepieces are sharper and are like looking through a larger diameter straw--the "circle" you see when you look through them is physically bigger. If the scope comes with H or SR eyepieces you'll want to upgrade them pretty much immediately. As an example, for a 70mm scope you want good low power (20-30x), medium power (50-80x), and high power (100-140x) eyepieces (or two eyepieces and a 2x Barlow lens). That's all you need.

 

I'm not sure what scopes are available to you over there, but a 70mm refractor or 76mm reflector is enough to get started with. I wouldn't recommend starting with anything smaller because it does start to limit the things you can see with them. Meade, Bresser, Orion, and many other brands sell reasonably priced scopes in that size range that usually come with acceptable eyepieces. Celestron entry level scopes usually come with H and SR eyepieces--and are usually more expensive than the equivalent Meade. I personally really like Meade's entry level products because they come with two or three MA eyepieces and a 2x Barlow lens. Not the highest quality but perfectly usable, and everything you really need is in the box so you don't have to buy something else right away.

 

If you really get into the hobby you'll outgrow a smaller scope within a year or so, which is the risk of buying a small scope. You can usually only resell it for 1/4 to 1/2 what you bought it for, so you lose some money (or you can think of it as spending that money to learn something). Of course, this also means, if you can find a used scope in good condition that can be a great value. I have a couple $20 scopes I use regularly. On the other hand, after using a small scope for a few months or a year you'll know exactly what you enjoy looking at and can make a more informed decision about what nicer telescope to buy, since most nicer scopes tend to specialize in one area or another and you'll better understand the trade-offs you make with one design versus another. Then you'll feel more confident about spending more money on a scope.

 

EDIT: Forgot to add that a good book like Turn Left at Orion or Nightwatch is just as important as a telescope. Books like that help you find interesting things to look at with your scope. TLAO focuses on easy to find things, many of which are visible even under fairly heavy light pollution. Nightwatch is a more general book with charts but doens't have the step-by-step directions for finding things that TLAO does.


Edited by JohnnyBGood, 15 May 2019 - 09:05 AM.

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#11 SeattleScott

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:36 AM

In many ways the biggest issue with the sub $100 scopes is the mount. They are often simply unusable. My parents bought me a $99 refractor on a horseshoe mount when I was in middle school. The backlash was awful. You find a target in the scope, you lock the clutch, you let go of the scope to swap eyepieces and the target is no longer in view. Eventually you learn that the scope will drop when you let go of it, so you find a target, then move up above the target, and hope it is in view when the scope drops down. A buddy had the same exact with a Celestron GoScope. My uncle has a Celestron 70mm refractor that he got for terrestrial views, and it is at least usable. Very aperture limited and the mount is on the shaky side, but if you know what to look for, you can see some things. And it didn’t frustrate me and tempt me to throw it off the balcony. Biggest issue was lack of aperture.

That being said, the used market can be great. A close family friend just got a 90mm entry level GoTo refractor off Craigslist for $40. The finderscope was broken so a replacement is on order, but even without the finderscope their kid is having a blast with it. Yeah it shakes when focusing. But he is mainly star cruising at low power right now anyway. He probably has Bortle 5 skies so you can see a fair amount with 90mm. Personally I consider 90mm somewhat of a minimum aperture, especially if you are dealing with light pollution. Some people do visual with 80mm. They must have darker skies than me. My uncle with the 70mm lives in the country so that made a small scope usable at least. So you might check out local used deals. Granted pricing will probably be higher than here in the US but you might still get a decent scope for $100. Especially when you are at a dark sky site.

Scott

Edited by SeattleScott, 15 May 2019 - 11:17 AM.

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#12 aeajr

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 03:41 PM

So, back to the scope that the OP asked about, the Orion SkyScanner 100.  

https://telescopicwa...r-100mm-review/

 

From the review:

 

Bottom Line

To summarize this review of Orion Skyscanner 100mm tabletop telescope, this is a very cute little grab and go tabletop scope. It won’t compete with the larger, more expensive scopes but, with the addition of a 3X Barlow, it should be a great little grab and go scope. It might also be appropriate for a preteen looking for their first telescope.

 

I would give it 3.5 stars out of 5 with the focuser being the main detractor and the need to add a table or stand to use it. A tripod mounted scope might be a more convenient option for many people.

 

When you take into account the cost of adding a Barlow lens to reach higher powers, a possible alternative choice would be something like the Meade Infinity 80 mm or 90 mm refractors. These are tripod mounted refractors with similar light gathering power which do not require a table and they include a Barlow lens in the package.

 

Regardless where you start, over time, you will likely accumulate the following:

  • Binoculars - something in the 7X35 to 10X50 range
  • Grab and Go scope - something in the 70 to 130 mm aperture range.   Light and easy to grab and go.  Often these have relatively short focal lengths and are considered wide view scopes.  The SkyScanner 100 would fit in this slot.
  • Light bucket = Usually 8"/203 mm or larger

You can start with any of them and happily find your way into astronomy.   I started with $20 binoculars and got hooked very quickly in a very light polluted area.    I then added an 80 mm refractor.  Then I added an 8" 203 mm scope.  So I had all three covered.

 

Today I have 6 scopes though I don't need 6.  The SkyScanner is one of them. 


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#13 nimitz69

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 07:36 PM

Maybe this would be an option ....

 

you said the club whose star party you attended was expensive to join but depending on exactly what that was (only you can decide), ask if the club has loner scopes that members can check out & use.  Many clubs here in the U.S. have loner scopes that members can check out for free.  My club even has a 16” GOTO Dob!

 

this way for just the cost of a membership you’d be able to borrow a scope (probably a very nice one) and have access to club members for their knowledge.  After one year with the club you should be in a position to know exactly what kind of scope you want and have had a year to help save up for it ...



#14 Sky Muse

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:57 PM

Hello everyone,
 
I'm a absolute beginner in astronomy - I used to be fascinated by it when I was a kid, but circumstances didn't allow for me to pursue that hobby, and I've only recently had the chance to get back into it. It has become apparent that I have no idea what I'm doing, so I'm here to ask for advice. Here's a quick rundown of the situation:
 
My interest came back recently after attending an astronomy event organized by a university. Some people from the local astronomy association brought their telescopes and made them available for everyone attending the event, they even let us try to take photos (that's where my avatar is from!). It was a lot of fun. Unfortunately, I didn't ask as many questions as I would have liked, because there were a lot of people waiting to try the telescopes and I didn't want to be a bother. This association also organizes its own events, but apparently it costs a significant amount of money to become a member (only members can attend), so I think first I should figure out if this is for me.
 
I am trying to decide if it would be worth it to get a telescope and begin learning on my own. I used to have a pair of binoculars (don't remember what kind), mostly for looking at the moon and whatever constellations I could identify. I don't have these anymore, and I'm not considering getting new ones because now it would be difficult for me to hold them up for any period of time. So I would rather get a telescope. I have a limited budget and I wouldn't want to go too much over ~100€. I think I would rather get a basic telescope now and upgrade later if I want to, than spend a lot of money now only to find out I don't really enjoy this that much. In that price range, I've seen the Orion SkyScanner 100mm recommended in a few different places (Amazon here has it for 109,99€). Any opinions on this telescope or any others in this range? Should I just try to save more or is this okay for a beginner? Is it a good idea to buy from Amazon or should I be looking at specialized shops?
 
Unfortunately, most of the time I would be observing in an area has a lot of light pollution - the Clear Outside app tells me it is Bortle 8. Would it be possible to see anything worthwhile from here? Frankly, I think if I could see some planets I would already be pretty happy. I also spend about one month a year somewhere else that according to Clear Outside is Bortle 4, which is decent if I understand the scale correctly. But I'm not sure if it's worth it to get a telescope I can only use for a month every year.
 
Sorry for the wall of text! I appreciate any advice or comments (and if I need telling off for saying something silly, please be gentle tongue2.gif)

This telescope kit is very popular among beginners.  It's an 130mm f/5 Newtonian, and upon a Dobson alt-azimuth mount...

 

https://www.teleskop...--6years--.html

 

It has a 650mm focal-length, and with a 2x and even a 3 barlow, you would be able to reach meaningful magnifications of the Moon, the planets, and the double-stars.

 

The Orion "SkyScanner" is a 100mm f/4 Newtonian.  It is also sold by Sky-Watcher as the "Heritage" 100P, and by Zhumell as the Z100.  I have the Zhumell Z100...

 

kit2a.jpg

 

It has a focal-length of only 400mm, which would make it difficult to reach the powers necessary to observe the planets, at 100x and up.  I look upon it as a specialty telescope, and to acquire later after other, more-versatile telescopes are had.  I do not consider it a beginner telescope, despite its small "cute as a button" size and lower price.  It is those two aspects that draw many beginners to that telescope, regrettably.  Newtonians at f/4 are primarily for imaging, with a camera, and an expensive imaging mount.  In the case of my own, I purchased it solely for low-power wide-field views of dimmer deep-sky objects.  It works quite good for that.  The telescope can go as low as 13x, and binocular-like.  Here is an image of the Moon I snapped through it one night, and at 13x...

 

011217-30mm3.jpg  

 

The image, during the actual live view, was sharp and clear, at that lowest power.  But you and the telescope may struggle to produce sharp, pleasing images the further you go up in power, due to the telescope's short focal-length(400mm), and the short focal-ratio(f/4) of the main, primary mirror at the rear of the tube. 

 

At f/5, and with that longer 650mm focal-length, the Sky-Watcher "Heritage" 130P would be a more versatile telescope, there in Madrid, and at a darker site.  The telescope, at f/5, would also be easier to collimate, align, when the time comes.  In Madrid, you'll be limited to the brighter and brightest objects in the night sky, and that's going to be the Moon, the planets, and the brighter stars.  At the darker site, you can make use of the telescope's low-to-medium powers, wider views, and larger aperture for the dimmer, deep-sky objects.  With deep-sky objects, the larger the aperture the better.  The planets also benefit from a larger aperture.

 

But before you decide, read through this long-running thread here within Cloudy Nights about the AWB "OneSky".  It's the same as the Sky-Watcher "Heritage" 130P...

 

https://www.cloudyni...ithout-borders/

 

Incidentally, it's long overdue in making it a "sticky".


Edited by Sky Muse, 15 May 2019 - 10:11 PM.

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#15 Carlos Flores

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 02:47 AM

 

Some good European webshops (there are more, of course):

 

Another vendor, located in Madrid, is Astrocity.  They have a Youtube channel in Spanish and i bought from them my Baader Zoom eyepiece. The owner was very friendly and helpful answering my calls from Denmark.  It is always good to be able to visit a physical shop in your location and test some equipment.

 

Carlos


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#16 vtornado

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 10:29 PM

Hi, and welcome to the forum.

 

There is lots of good info here.  I'm not knowlegable about the European market.  Here in the states,  there are plenty of 4.25 inch reflector telescopes for sale on the used market.  They make excellent first scopes.

 

I like an 80mm f/11 refractor another good scope to start with.

 

As others have said, the mount is very important.  Generally bigger is better.   If you are handy, and pick up a used scope, you can

build a pipe mount.  Medical crutches can be used to make a tripod. 



#17 Cirax

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 02:14 PM

A lot good advices here, I'm going to resume my thoughts

 

I have an Orion Dobson telescope MC 90/1250 Starmax DOB that has the same mount of the Orion SkyScanner 100mm and it's pretty annoying to look up for something with it.  With such small aperture the obstruction of the secondary it's more than relevant (less light in the primary mirror), in my Mak 90mm the obstruction is 28% for example.  Also you have to collimate it before every use.  With a short focal relation of f/4 you will suffer coma aberration with stars at the edge of the eyepiece unless you buy good eyepieces.

 

Like many other people I recommend you to spare some money (keep in mind that you will have to buy some aditional eyepieces) and begin at least with something like this refractor:

 

Skywatcher Telescope AC 90/900 EvoStar AZ-3  cost double (215 euros) but It has a good altazimuth mount, a long focal ratio that fixes almost any posible chromatic aberration in planetary, no obstruction, no coma aberrarions in refractors, no collimations.  In my opinion one of the best telescopes to start without been dissapointed.  The only problem is its size, like a meter long.

 

I also have a Bresser Dobson telescope N 150/750 Messier DOB, with a bortle 8 of LP in city I was able to see the ring and dummbell nebulae, something I didn´t expect with only a 6" reflector in urban skies, the wild duck cluster look beautiful too.  In bortle 3-4 I was able to detect easily messier galaxies (like the Leo Triplet) and nebulae, globular clusters start to be resolved as individual stars, at least the brighter ones.  You can also look up for this one: Omegon Dobson telescope Advanced N 152/1200 that is 30 euros cheaper but longer.  In my opinion a 6 inches reflector it's the best option to begin in this hobby.  


Edited by Cirax, 19 May 2019 - 06:39 PM.


#18 maelstrom9999

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 04:49 PM

Others have recommended binoculars, but OP said he's not interested because of difficulties holding them up.  I don't know much about binoculars, but I know you can put them on a tripod.  Might be able to get a cheap pair plus a cheap tripod.

 

Otherwise, this is about the most aperture you can get for ~100 euros.

 

Meade LightBridge Mini 114mm:

 

https://www.amazon.c...ade Lightbridge

 

This was linked by another poster above but mis-described as the 130 mm version, which seems to be discontinued and not available new.

 

Based on current exchange rates, that's $110 Euros.  I really wouldn't go any lower or you risk just not being satisfied with your experience.  


Edited by maelstrom9999, 19 May 2019 - 04:51 PM.


#19 jpcampbell

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 03:48 PM

I have the Meade Mini 114 and I think it's just about right for a beginner if budget is a major consideration. While its limits become apparent in city skies, I think it's fantastic for the Moon and a good telescope to learn the sky with. But I really think you'll need binoculars living in the city. While some constellations, like Orion, can be made out with the naked eye in my city, others are too faint and binoculars help me get properly oriented to the area of the sky available to me. I can then more easily navigate within the constellation with a scope.

 

Binoculars can be expensive, but you don't need expensive binoculars to get started. I started with $50 10x50 Celestron Upclose G2 and they're just fine for my purposes at the moment.

 

https://www.amazon.e...U_i5W4CbB8MQYAD

 

If you buy these through Amazon, make sure you test them within the return period. There are many reports of these bins shipping out of collimation, which is what happened in my case. I just returned them and got another and they were fine. 

 

The Meade Mini 114 can also be had through Amazon:

https://www.amazon.e...id=BYANMDMPI1R3

 

If 100€ is your absolute limit, then I'd say get yourself the Celeston 10x50s and a sky atlas and when you can spend closer to 200€, get a scope. The binoculars and atlas will always be useful, but a 100€ scope will quickly lose its appeal and will most likely induce frustration.


Edited by jpcampbell, 20 May 2019 - 11:22 PM.

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