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ASI224 and Daytime testing question

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#1 Biggen

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:37 AM

So I purchased a 224 and have been playing around with it and my WO61 scope.  However, my question has to do with daytime testing.  I focused in on the roof line of a house quite a ways away this morning.  I'm using Sharpcap, so I had to dial down the gain to zero and set the exposure time to very fast.  I was in RAW16 mode and software binning 2x2.  I took a quick cell phone picture of the house line I was testing with:

 

gqMriq6l.jpg

 

Here is what I got with the camera via Sharpcap:

 

drLSmT1l.png

 

Why are the colors so terrible or is this normal during the day?  I hit auto white balance and then auto histogram in Sharpcap itself.  I then tried playing with the histogram but don't really know what I'm doing.

 

I've found the unofficial Sharpcap Tutorial that was posted here some time ago and used that as a starting point.

 

 



#2 mclewis1

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:54 AM

One problem with colors during the day with an astronomy oriented camera is the lack of a UV/IR filter. Adding one of these filters will cut out those shorter and longer wavelengths which really helps with the color balance and in some cases it makes the image a little crisper too.

 

Usually I find that a UV/IR cut filter, an auto white balance, and a little manipulation of the histogram gets me a satisfactory image of terrestrial stuff.



#3 Biggen

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 09:23 AM

One problem with colors during the day with an astronomy oriented camera is the lack of a UV/IR filter. Adding one of these filters will cut out those shorter and longer wavelengths which really helps with the color balance and in some cases it makes the image a little crisper too.

 

Usually I find that a UV/IR cut filter, an auto white balance, and a little manipulation of the histogram gets me a satisfactory image of terrestrial stuff.

Ok that helps a lot.  I don't mean to use this for terrestrial viewing.  I just wanted to make sure everything works and I could achieve focus before I start messing with this at night.

 

I'll fire it up tonight and see how it goes.  




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