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Help me set up my system for beginning astrophotography

astrophotography beginner Celestron dslr equipment imaging mount refractor
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#1 carbean

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 12:25 PM

Hello gang!

    I am interested in doing some astrophotography.  I have a couple Celestron Cassegrain scopes for visual which I have been enjoying playing with.  After some research I have started a shopping list for a starter setup for astrophotography:

 

STELLARVUE SVX080T-25SV PREMIER F/6 TRIPLET REFRACTING TELESCOPE

 

Baader Planetarium Sky Surfer V with Quick Release Dovetail - SSV

 

Large Photographic Field Flattener for SVX80T-25SV

 

Nikon D5300 DX-Format 24.2 MP Digital SLR Camera Body

 

a couple of spacer rings or extension tubes of unknown size?

 

something (is it a "T ring"?) to connect the camera to the scope

 

Celestron Advanced VX Mount

 

Dew controller, band for scope (just one for the objective?)

 

The Deep-sky Imaging Primer, Second Edition

 

 

  I am new to astronomy in general.  Please forgive my ignorance.  So I have come to the temple of truth for some guidance.  What do you think of my choices so far?  What else do I need?  I have an iMac for my home computer, I have a MacBook Pro, and an iPad Mini4 and an iPhone that I run SkySafari Pro on.  Do I need to get a Windows PC for processing?  I have two WiFi connectors, two StarSense units, and two Time and GPS modules and several Li batteries I use on my other Celestron mounts that I could use with this mount.  I have a bunch of (too many) eyepieces.  I'm sure I'll have more questions once I start getting some advice.  Thanks in advance.  I look forward to chatting!

 

Todd (carbean)


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#2 TinySpeck

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 12:47 PM

Instead of astrophotography, why don't you try something easier like neurosurgery?  grin.gif

 

Just a couple generic comments here: get the best mount you can afford.  That's more important than the telescope & camera, to begin with.  I don't know anything about the Advanced VX, maybe it's good enough.

 

Figure out your angular sampling in arc-s/pixel with your chosen optics and camera, and aim for about 0.5 to 0.9.  Higher leads to undersampling, lower leads to wasted pixels and higher noise.  This will also lead to your field of view (FOV), which you can use to see how big typical subjects will look in your images.  That can be a surprise.

 

I like that book -- it will help out a lot.  Jerry Lodriguss has a nice intro to AP with a DSLR too.

 

Do consider software.  You'll want an image-gathering thing like APT or Sequence Generator Pro, and image processing like StarTools or PixInsight.  Software may drive your hardware decisions.


Edited by TinySpeck, 22 May 2019 - 12:53 PM.

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#3 Peregrinatum

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:14 PM

Just went through this a few months ago...

 

First, what is your budget?

 

Second, what type of targets do you want to image?



#4 carbean

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:24 PM

Just went through this a few months ago...

 

First, what is your budget?

 

Second, what type of targets do you want to image?

About 2-3k/mo as long as I am interested in it and something more pressing does not come up! LoL

 

Not really sure till I try it, anything of beauty that lends itself to imaging I suppose, don't really know yet.  Is there a scope that would enable me to do planetary as well as DSO's?

 

Todd



#5 durak

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:45 PM

Hello gang!

    I am interested in doing some astrophotography.  I have a couple Celestron Cassegrain scopes for visual which I have been enjoying playing with.  After some research I have started a shopping list for a starter setup for astrophotography:

 

STELLARVUE SVX080T-25SV PREMIER F/6 TRIPLET REFRACTING TELESCOPE

 

Baader Planetarium Sky Surfer V with Quick Release Dovetail - SSV

 

Large Photographic Field Flattener for SVX80T-25SV

 

Nikon D5300 DX-Format 24.2 MP Digital SLR Camera Body

 

a couple of spacer rings or extension tubes of unknown size?

 

something (is it a "T ring"?) to connect the camera to the scope

 

Celestron Advanced VX Mount

 

Dew controller, band for scope (just one for the objective?)

 

The Deep-sky Imaging Primer, Second Edition

 

 

  I am new to astronomy in general.  Please forgive my ignorance.  So I have come to the temple of truth for some guidance.  What do you think of my choices so far?  What else do I need?  I have an iMac for my home computer, I have a MacBook Pro, and an iPad Mini4 and an iPhone that I run SkySafari Pro on.  Do I need to get a Windows PC for processing?  I have two WiFi connectors, two StarSense units, and two Time and GPS modules and several Li batteries I use on my other Celestron mounts that I could use with this mount.  I have a bunch of (too many) eyepieces.  I'm sure I'll have more questions once I start getting some advice.  Thanks in advance.  I look forward to chatting!

 

Todd (carbean)

If I were in your position (and I was very recently), I would spend less on the scope and more on the mount. Instead of 1600 on the scope and 900 on the scope, I would flip those numbers and get a EQ6-R mount and either an explore scientific, Astro-tech, or even an Orion 80mm triplet. 

 

Some people have had good luck with the AVX but it really does seem to be down whether or not you are lucky enough to get a "good" one. Almost everyone that I know that has an EQ6-R is happy with their purchase, myself included. Keep in mind though, the EQ6-R pro is a heavy bugger. 

 

You could also save a couple hundred dollars off the EQ6 and go with an Orion Atlas, not quite as good as the EQ6-R but also a few hundred dollars cheaper. You could then put the money you saved on the mount toward an autoguiding system which you can realistically get up and running for around $300.

 

Also don't forget to get a Bahtinov mask for focusing! They are cheap (~$15) and make focusing simple.

 

That's just my two cents, I am also a beginner but I have been extremely happy with my purchases so far.


Edited by durak, 22 May 2019 - 01:52 PM.

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#6 cfosterstars

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:46 PM

Instead of astrophotography, why don't you try something easier like neurosurgery?  grin.gif

 

Just a couple generic comments here: get the best mount you can afford.  That's more important than the telescope & camera, to begin with.  I don't know anything about the Advanced VX, maybe it's good enough.

 

Figure out your angular sampling in arc-s/pixel with your chosen optics and camera, and aim for about 0.5 to 0.9.  Higher leads to undersampling, lower leads to wasted pixels and higher noise.  This will also lead to your field of view (FOV), which you can use to see how big typical subjects will look in your images.  That can be a surprise.

 

I like that book -- it will help out a lot.  Jerry Lodriguss has a nice intro to AP with a DSLR too.

 

Do consider software.  You'll want an image-gathering thing like APT or Sequence Generator Pro, and image processing like StarTools or PixInsight.  Software may drive your hardware decisions.

I have a degree in Phd in nuclear physics and I do AP for the challenge...smile.gif  (actually true)

 

How much of you list have already purchased?

 

The mount quality if #1, then there is the mount quality followed by the mount quality! then we can talk about the OTA/camera and other lesser things. I would look at used mounts also since you can find nice used mounts from those getting out of this insanity or going deeper to join us  by upgrading.

 

The AVX is "OK" from what I have read but there seems to be a lot of variation in manufacturing so there are "good" ones and "bad" ones. If I was starting out, I would go for a EQ6 mount instead since you might find a used one. They are good mounts for AP and can run EQMOD which is an AWESOME free ASCOM interface. 

 

They choice of OTAs is a really good place to start. The new SVX80 is a fine scope and it has a good flattener/reducer. It wont be very good for most galaxies accept M31 and M33 or planetary so you are looking at mostly large DSO targets.

 

You have not mentioned any autoguider or guide scope/camera - that is required for most AP. With the AVX, you will definitely not be doing any unguided AP, so this is a must have.

 

I use SGP also and I highly recommend it. Very good bang for the buck. It takes some learning, but it is powerful - you get a really good platesolving tool for free for instance. I paid as much for just platesolving a while back.

 

YOu have not metioned how much LP you have at where you are imaging. That is important since LP will limit what you can do with your camera. Do you have the DSLR or are you looking at buying one? Since DSOs are the best match for your scope, an unmodified DSLR is limited for red and a lot of DSO is Ha so that it an issue. You can either live with it, modify your camera, or if you have not purchased  I strongly recommend a cooled AP camera instead. It all depends on your budget. You would have to pay more upfront but for me it is worth it with the low cost of cooled CMOS cameras these days.

 

I could go on more. these are just my opinions, so that them as just that. You can make AP work with a lot of different equipment, but when I started I got the wrong OTA and the wrong mount with the wrong camera. I got there but it was painful and expensive.


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#7 cfosterstars

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:51 PM

If I were in your position (and I was very recently), I would spend less on the scope and more on the mount. Instead of 1600 on the scope and 900 on the scope, I would flip those numbers and get a EQ6-R mount and either an explore scientific, Astro-tech, or even an Orion 80mm triplet. 

 

Some people have had good luck with the AVX but it really does seem to be down whether or not you are lucky enough to get a "good" one. Almost everyone that I know that has an EQ6-R is happy with their purchase, myself included. Keep in mind though, the EQ6-R pro is a heavy bugger. 

 

You could also save a couple hundred dollars off the EQ6 and go with an Orion Atlas, not quite as good as the EQ6-R but also a few hundred dollars cheaper. You could then put the money you saved on the mount toward an autoguiding system which you can realistically get up and running for around $300.

 

Also don't forget to get a Bahtinov mask for focusing! They are cheap (~$15) and make focusing simple.

 

That's just my two cents, I am also a beginner but I have been extremely happy with my purchases so far.

 

 

Also don't forget to get a Bahtinov mask for focusing! They are cheap (~$15) and make focusing simple!

I was typing my post when yours showed up! Fully agree with the mount discussion. The Orion is not that far off from the EQ6-R, but you can find them used for a good deal. The EQ6-R is nice. I have the HDX-110 EQ-G which is the same as the EQ8 and love it. Still has backlash (@#*@&(@), but it is rock solid.

 

There are also now some cheaper focus moterizers on the market. ZWO just came out with one. I love autofocus - I never worry about it and SGP work well for automation.

 

https://astronomy-im...product/zwo-eaf



#8 JP50515

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:16 PM

About 2-3k/mo as long as I am interested in it and something more pressing does not come up! LoL

 

Not really sure till I try it, anything of beauty that lends itself to imaging I suppose, don't really know yet.  Is there a scope that would enable me to do planetary as well as DSO's?

 

Todd

Very much a beginner question haha. Not jabbing you at all, but we get this a lot. The answer is kinda...but not really...the reflecting scopes that lend themselves better to both realms are not good to learn on, and based on the first part of your response, which indicates you may not stick with it if you get frustrated...your current choice of a small refractor is the best option. Keep in mind that FOV is also determined by sensor size...so you can use different cameras to get "closer" to galaxies or planetary nebula for example. 

 

 

To piggy back the others, a good mount is your top priority. The EQ6-R Pro is an exceptional mount that you will not likely outgrow for some time. 
Highly recommended. 
 

 

Are you buying the DSLR specifically for AP? If so you should consider one of the many cooled-One shot color cameras made for AP.  It will give you far better results than a DSLR with no added complexity. If however, you have the DSLR already...use it.  A cooled OSC would work wonderfully for planetary imaging as well. 

Let us know what you land on. 
 



#9 Sven_Bortle5

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:32 PM

I have also started last September and knew I would go for astrophotography.

 

So I originally planned to buy a Meade LX85 GoTo mount and a Skywatcher ESPRIT 80ED. I still think this might be a good starting point for a smaller budgets, because the mount is capable of carrying 15 kg and it's very portable. The ESPRIT 80ED has great specs and you'll find impressive shots.

 

Finally, the mount and the scope have not been available for 2 months. So I upped my budget and bought the EQ6-R Pro and a William Optics GT81. I only added a cheap guidescope, and my … good old … Canon EOS 450D was modified. This setup works great but to my mind it's close to edge of not being portable. Fully set up it weights about 40 kg right now, something you do not want to carry around much.

 

But this is actually what I prefer to do while learning. It's waiting to be carried out into the garden in the evening and to be carried back in in the morning.

 

So I would if budget is okay, also suggest to go for the EQ6-R Pro (and some hours in the gym). And with an old, modified Canon EOS you will quickly have some really cool images.



#10 carbean

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:35 PM

Alright guys,

 

"How much of you list have already purchased?" cfosterstars

None

 

"Instead of 1600 on the scope and 900 on the scope, I would flip those numbers and get a EQ6-R mount and either an explore scientific, Astro-tech, or even an Orion 80mm triplet." said durak

 

OK, I can swing a SkyWatcher S30300 EQ6-R Pro Mount at $1,600 but I'm getting conflicting advice on the tube.  

 

"The new SVX80 is a fine scope and it has a good flattener/reducer. It wont be very good for most galaxies accept M31 and M33 or planetary so you are looking at mostly large DSO targets." cfosterstars

 

Are you saying I need a better scope for a variety of targets?  It seems that durak is advising something of lesser quality or price at least.

 

Recommend me an "autoguider or guide scope/camera" in the <$500 range?

 

What is "SGP"?

 

As far as light pollution goes, I am not sure how to quantify it.  At my house I have some but I usually drive to what I have read are Bortle 2 skies at Calhoun County Park for any dedicated stargazing time.

 

Keep it coming!

 

Todd


Edited by carbean, 22 May 2019 - 02:39 PM.


#11 JP50515

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:36 PM

I have also started last September and knew I would go for astrophotography.

 

So I originally planned to buy a Meade LX85 GoTo mount and a Skywatcher ESPRIT 80ED. I still think this might be a good starting point for a smaller budgets, because the mount is capable of carrying 15 kg and it's very portable. The ESPRIT 80ED has great specs and you'll find impressive shots.

 

Finally, the mount and the scope have not been available for 2 months. So I upped my budget and bought the EQ6-R Pro and a William Optics GT81. I only added a cheap guidescope, and my … good old … Canon EOS 450D was modified. This setup works great but to my mind it's close to edge of not being portable. Fully set up it weights about 40 kg right now, something you do not want to carry around much.

 

But this is actually what I prefer to do while learning. It's waiting to be carried out into the garden in the evening and to be carried back in in the morning.

 

So I would if budget is okay, also suggest to go for the EQ6-R Pro (and some hours in the gym). And with an old, modified Canon EOS you will quickly have some really cool images.

One thing to keep in mind is that for AP we typically suggest cutting the rated weight in half so a 15kg scope can carry 7.5kg successfully for AP. 



#12 JP50515

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:52 PM

Alright guys,

 

"How much of you list have already purchased?" cfosterstars

None

 

"Instead of 1600 on the scope and 900 on the scope, I would flip those numbers and get a EQ6-R mount and either an explore scientific, Astro-tech, or even an Orion 80mm triplet." said durak

 

OK, I can swing a SkyWatcher S30300 EQ6-R Pro Mount at $1,600 but I'm getting conflicting advice on the tube.  

 

"The new SVX80 is a fine scope and it has a good flattener/reducer. It wont be very good for most galaxies accept M31 and M33 or planetary so you are looking at mostly large DSO targets." cfosterstars

 

Are you saying I need a better scope for a variety of targets?  It seems that durak is advising something of lesser quality or price at least.

 

Recommend me an "autoguider or guide scope/camera" in the <$500 range?

 

What is "SGP"?

 

As far as light pollution goes, I am not sure how to quantify it.  At my house I have some but I usually drive to what I have read are Bortle 2 skies at Calhoun County Park for any dedicated stargazing time.

 

Keep it coming!

 

Todd

Guidescope - https://www.highpoin...scope-kit-60280 - I love this scope but there are a ton of 50-60mm options out there for cheap. Doesn't need to be any special, just needs to be able to piggy back onto your imaging scope. 

The cameras for guiding are super sensitive and typically monochrome. This is a very popular option: https://www.highpoin...mera-asi120mini

 



#13 carbean

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:56 PM

"...if you have not purchased  I strongly recommend a cooled AP camera instead. It all depends on your budget. You would have to pay more upfront but for me it is worth it with the low cost of cooled CMOS cameras these days."  cfosterstars

 

    I have a couple of old Canon small sensor bodies around here somewhere but I haven't seen them in a year or so.  I read somewhere that the Nikon I referenced above was a good starting point and they are available cheap refurbished.  I looked at color CMOS cameras that, if I understand correctly, could acquire enough photons to generate acceptable images with an acquisition time low enough that I would not need a guider system but they were >1k in price.  Again, I am new to astronomy and might have been looking at something completely out there!  What dedicated camera would you recommend?

 

Todd



#14 Sven_Bortle5

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 02:57 PM

@Ranger4: Definately correct.

 

I also know the rule for cutting the rated weight in half. The ESPRIT ED80 is app. 4 kg and additional stuff like guidescope, camera and powerbox add app. another 2 kg. So the EQ6-R Pro will beat the LX85 in this respect. Nevertheless, it's half the price of the EQ6-R Pro. For someone who is not already planning the next 2 upgrades, it may be an option…

 

There seems to be this "15 kg"-class in mounts (see the HEQ5 Pro).



#15 Peregrinatum

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:09 PM

About 2-3k/mo as long as I am interested in it and something more pressing does not come up! LoL

 

Not really sure till I try it, anything of beauty that lends itself to imaging I suppose, don't really know yet.  Is there a scope that would enable me to do planetary as well as DSO's?

 

Todd

I think you should take more time to research exactly what it is you want to do, and what is actually involved with the AP process... you may not even like all that is involved before you actually get in the position to take one picture, and then the time and patience needed to process the image.



#16 JP50515

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:12 PM

"...if you have not purchased  I strongly recommend a cooled AP camera instead. It all depends on your budget. You would have to pay more upfront but for me it is worth it with the low cost of cooled CMOS cameras these days."  cfosterstars

 

    I have a couple of old Canon small sensor bodies around here somewhere but I haven't seen them in a year or so.  I read somewhere that the Nikon I referenced above was a good starting point and they are available cheap refurbished.  I looked at color CMOS cameras that, if I understand correctly, could acquire enough photons to generate acceptable images with an acquisition time low enough that I would not need a guider system but they were >1k in price.  Again, I am new to astronomy and might have been looking at something completely out there!  What dedicated camera would you recommend?

 

Todd

The benefit of the cooled one shot color camera is that it's cooled. This will let you image for much longer exposures with far less noise (the bane of DSLR cameras). It's also going to be awesome for planetary imaging and EAA (electronically assisted astronomy). 


They are designed and dedicate for AP purposes so if you were planning to spend around $1000 for a camera anyway I'd definitely look towards a OSC option. ZWO makes some really popular models, but specific ones are better for different target types. 

Again it's best to match it to your desired targets and the scope you choose. 


I just quickly threw that Stellarvue and the ZWO ASI183 into this calculator to see what the FOV would look like.  http://www.blackwate...maging-toolbox/  

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#17 Sven_Bortle5

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:17 PM

Guidescope: I bought an Altair Starwave 50mm (120 EUR) and a ZWO ASI290MM mini guidecam (300 EUR). Works perfect with PHD2 and can be connected to the mount using the ST-4 port.

 

Regarding the cam I have read a lot… but honestly did not test much. For starting I took the most simple solution by having my EOS 450D modified.

 

If you have a small focal length telescope, then you should at least check the suitability of the camera's sensor your heading for (https://astronomy.to...ccd_suitability). Especially when you have good seeing, those dedicated cameras may undersample quite significantly. Take your time and experiment.

 

I have been happy with the 450D, but have just bought a 70D due to its smaller pixel size and low noise (for a DSLR). I payed less than 400 EUR for that. Again not the best you can (what would be a cooled AP cam), but definately a well working option.



#18 carbean

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:19 PM

So is the ESPRIT ED80 a better option than the STELLARVUE SVX080T-25SV I was looking at for the price?  I read that the Esprit has "FPL-53 ED and Schott BK-7 glass" and that the Stellarvue has an "Ohara FPL-53 center element".  The two are about the same price but the Esprit comes with the field flattener which Stellarvue charges an additional $270 for.

 

Todd



#19 JP50515

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:21 PM

Yeah if you have some old Canons laying around you should honestly just start on those and decide if you like the hobby. I can fairly confidently say some DSLR's are better than others but none compare to a dedicated AP camera so maybe save your money, since the barrier to entry is financially pretty darn steep and use your existing DSLR's for a while. 

Poke around on Astrobin.com to see what people are doing with the dedicated AP cameras if you want and decide down the road once you know if you're gonna stick with it. 



#20 Sven_Bortle5

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:37 PM

So is the ESPRIT ED80 a better option than the STELLARVUE SVX080T-25SV I was looking at for the price?  I read that the Esprit has "FPL-53 ED and Schott BK-7 glass" and that the Stellarvue has an "Ohara FPL-53 center element".  The two are about the same price but the Esprit comes with the field flattener which Stellarvue charges an additional $270 for.

 

Todd

I think the difference between comparable APOs which use FPL-53 shouldn't be that big. Compare pictures at Astrobin - they are more or less within the same range if the scopes are of the same configuration. At least I couldn't judge the influence of the scope alone.

 

At least that was the reason why I shifted budget (like those 270$ you mentioned) to components which make things easy. Spending e.g. the 300 EUR for a Polemaster was definately one of the best ideas. Perfect polar-alignment means way less fumbling around while setting up and you get better images, because your alignment works.



#21 Phil Sherman

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:38 PM

Your Celestron scopes are reasonable instruments for "lucky" planetary imaging. You can do this by using your Nikon's video mode and existing alt-az mounts. For deep sky objects, a short focal length 80mm recractor and cropped frames from your Nikon will, let you get your feet wet.

 

Serious DSO imaging requires a guided equatorial mount. At your investment level, the mount's rated capacity should be double the weight if the imaging gear. Other mounts for you to consider are Skywatcher (also Orion), and Ioptron offerings. Another alternative for your gear could be a wedge to convert your mount into an equatorial one. My preference for an entry level mount is Orion's Sirius or the equivalent Skywatcher, the HEQ5.

 

Backyard Nikon may be the least expensive camera control program you can get. ImagesPlus, if it handles your Nikon raw images, is a great image processing program that will also serve you well when you graduate to a true astro camera that creates FITS files.

 

You should expect a year or two of imaging to become competent with image processing. I'd suggest holding off buying an astro camera until you've gained some image processing experience.

A book I like is "The New CCD Astronomy". The sections in it describing specific image processing programs are very dated but everything else in the book still applies to astro imaging.



#22 carbean

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:38 PM

Yeah if you have some old Canons laying around you should honestly just start on those and decide if you like the hobby. I can fairly confidently say some DSLR's are better than others but none compare to a dedicated AP camera so maybe save your money, since the barrier to entry is financially pretty darn steep and use your existing DSLR's for a while. 

Poke around on Astrobin.com to see what people are doing with the dedicated AP cameras if you want and decide down the road once you know if you're gonna stick with it. 

You don't understand man, my last wife accused me of having a hobby/shopping problem.  I derive a lot of joy out of shopping for and procuring good @#$%!  Don't get me wrong, I play with my toys, but I don't mind spending a little coin on quality instruments.  If I should be considering a dedicated camera I would like to know which model(s) are a good bang for the buck with an eye towards quality over cost.

 

Todd



#23 Sven_Bortle5

Sven_Bortle5

    Sputnik

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  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Düsseldorf, Germany

Posted 22 May 2019 - 04:03 PM

I understand that. I am into innovation and technology and do also strive for best quality. That's why I plan these things like a project.

 

First phase were all parts, which can't easily be upgraded: The mount (EQ6-R Pro) and the scope. Canon 450D, spotting scope (Starwave 50mm with a crosshair ocular) were cheap and good quality.

Second phase were the goodies: Astro Powerbox and Polemaster … plus dew heater straps.

Thrid phase was the guidecam ASI290MM mini (for the Starwave 50mm)

 

… now I'll see… well, the Canon 70D is on the way.

 

I have already tried shooting with clip-in filters. Works fine, too.

 

In phase 4 I plan to go for a cooled astro cam - but maybe next year, definately not earlier. As the Canons are good at full colour imaging, I can only imagine to go for a mono astrocam. Adding the required filters, tubes and so, this will be a package of 2000 EUR! This is why I am patient.

 

I have always tried to max my results in each phase. It's great and really rewarding to see how things get better and better - by slowly becoming more experienced and upgrading the setup.


Edited by Sven_Bortle5, 22 May 2019 - 04:19 PM.


#24 Peregrinatum

Peregrinatum

    Mariner 2

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  • Joined: 27 Dec 2018

Posted 22 May 2019 - 04:11 PM

If you want quality, and money is not so much a concern, this is how I would spend your money to get started:

 

Stellarvue 80mm (mentioned above), with flattener

EQ6-R mount

ASI1600 Pro (mono cooled)

Astrodon LRGB and NB filters 1.25" mounted

EFW 8 position filter wheel

ASI290MM mini as a guide cam

Stellarvue 60mm guide scope

Polemaster

Sequence Generator Pro

PixInsight

 

Acquiring all of that and getting it running smoothly together will keep you busy for a while.


  • schmeah likes this

#25 carbean

carbean

    Explorer 1

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  • topic starter
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 01 May 2019
  • Loc: Charleston, WV, USA

Posted 22 May 2019 - 04:28 PM

If you want quality, and money is not so much a concern, this is how I would spend your money to get started:

 

Stellarvue 80mm (mentioned above), with flattener

EQ6-R mount

ASI1600 Pro (mono cooled)

Astrodon LRGB and NB filters 1.25" mounted

EFW 8 position filter wheel

ASI290MM mini as a guide cam

Stellarvue 60mm guide scope

Polemaster

Sequence Generator Pro

PixInsight

 

Acquiring all of that and getting it running smoothly together will keep you busy for a while.

That's what I'm talking about!  Do I need a Windows based PC for processing?  I'm all Apple right now.

 

Todd




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