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Jupiter, Moon and Saturn: 2019-05-21

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#1 DMach

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 11:03 PM

It was a long weekend here last weekend, but cloudy every night except the night before I had to go back to work (of course)!

 

There was still some high level hazy cloud (the Moon casting a halo) but some good data resulted none-the-less.

 

All taken with: C11, ASI290MC, UV/IR cut filter, ZWO ADC

 

First capture was Jupiter, showing good detail (including two large ovals) in the polar regions. 9 x 90s captures, de-rotated in WinJUPOS.

Jupiter 2019-05-21 02-28 v2 500px.png

 

Then I grabbed a single video of the Moon (Petavius region) as it was crossing the meridian. The full-scale picture can be viewed here. Let me know your thoughts on the level of sharpening ... so tempting to go overboard when you see those smaller craters popping out!

Moon 2019-05-21 02-49 Petavius v3 500px.png

 

And finally Saturn, showing some nice banding in northern hemisphere (boosted the colour and tweaked the colour balance a little to emphasise this). 7 x 90s captures, de-rotated in WinJUPOS.

Saturn 2019-05-21 03-31 v2 33pc.png

 

All in all, a very enjoyable session.  smile.gif

 


Edited by DMach, 22 May 2019 - 11:18 PM.

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#2 Tom Glenn

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 11:34 PM

Darren, all very nice images.  As to your question, the lunar image is the appropriate level of sharpening imo.  Any more, and what starts to happen is you get ringing artifacts that exaggerate the size of the small craters and make it look unnatural.  Your version looks very natural, as does your Jupiter and Saturn.  



#3 B 26354

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 11:43 PM

I love the Moon shot. Wonderful detail, and perfectly sharpened. Petavius was the first lunar crater that I ever sketched... way back in 1956. Thanks for posting it.


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#4 Lacaille

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 11:57 PM

Nice work!



#5 Tyson M

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 12:09 AM

Killer images! 



#6 siriusandthepup

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 12:09 AM

Wow - I thought for sure that those were all C14 shots. Great great work with the C11!!! bow.gif waytogo.gif



#7 KiwiRay

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 12:19 AM

Love the Saturn image, Darren! (The others are great too.)  The hexagon is really sharp.  It looks like you've captured some small storms or kinks in the cloud bands - any chance of putting the 7 original images together in an animation to verify?



#8 oshimitsu

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 12:24 AM

Your images make me really optimistic about purchasing my C11 for planetary. I have a lot to learn about the process and plan on spending some time practicing this weekend. Do you have any advice for someone who is inexperienced in planetary imaging?



#9 happylimpet

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 05:05 AM

Those images are **** near perfect. In particular Im impressed with the lack of artifacts on Saturn - whenever i derotate saturn i get unpleasant effects on the limbs.  What settings are you using for LD (limb darkening)? Any other advice?

 

And as Kiwiray points out, some cloud features are well seen - I would also love to see an animation!

 

Nice work.



#10 Foehammer

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 05:16 AM

Exceptional imagery! Have you considered presenting at a slightly larger scale? Looks like the data can easily handle resizing.



#11 Tulloch

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 05:20 AM

Brilliant (as usual), glad to see you've been able to image Saturn, every bit as good as your Jupiter shots.

 

One question if I may, how do you stack your 7 x 90 sec captures in WinJupos, do you do this as the raw videos or as stacked photos?

 

Thanks, Andrew



#12 DMach

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 08:59 AM

Darren, all very nice images.  As to your question, the lunar image is the appropriate level of sharpening imo.  Any more, and what starts to happen is you get ringing artifacts that exaggerate the size of the small craters and make it look unnatural.  Your version looks very natural, as does your Jupiter and Saturn.  

Thanks Tom - given your level of experience and knowledge, gives me a good level of comfort that I'm on the right track with the settings.

 

I love the Moon shot. Wonderful detail, and perfectly sharpened. Petavius was the first lunar crater that I ever sketched... way back in 1956. Thanks for posting it.

It is an amazing crater ... has a bit of everything! The forces that went into creating all of those features blows the mind.

 

Nice work!

Thanks Mark!

 

Killer images! 

Thanks Tyson :)

 

Wow - I thought for sure that those were all C14 shots. Great great work with the C11!!! bow.gif waytogo.gif

Thank you!



#13 DMach

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 09:03 AM

Love the Saturn image, Darren! (The others are great too.)  The hexagon is really sharp.  It looks like you've captured some small storms or kinks in the cloud bands - any chance of putting the 7 original images together in an animation to verify?

Thanks Ray - the Saturn image is my favourite of the bunch too, would have to be my best to date. Good suggestion re: creating an animation ... I just need to tread a little carefully with the amount of time I'm putting into processing, it's creating a little tension at home lol.

 

Those images are **** near perfect. In particular Im impressed with the lack of artifacts on Saturn - whenever i derotate saturn i get unpleasant effects on the limbs.  What settings are you using for LD (limb darkening)? Any other advice?

 

And as Kiwiray points out, some cloud features are well seen - I would also love to see an animation!

 

Nice work.

Thank you! Yes, I found I get some edge artefacts if I don't use some LD. But I only need a little - I set it to 95. But my feeling is that the sharpening you perform prior to de-rotation matters as well, e.g. that you need to be careful not to bring edge artefacts in from the wavelet process. (Through experimentation, I have found that you can leverage the wavelet settings to minimise the Gibbs effect, for example.) Just a gut feel though ... maybe those with more experience and knowledge of the theory could comment more authoritatively.

 

Exceptional imagery! Have you considered presenting at a slightly larger scale? Looks like the data can easily handle resizing.

Thanks Foehammer! The image sizes about were chosen to respect the size limitations for Cloudy Nights ... which for some reason I thought was 500px (although now that I check again, I see that I was wrong on this ... or maybe I was thinking of a different forum).

 

In any case, you can always see the images at what I consider to be the optimal scale given the data quality on by Astrobin page. I tend to lean towards smaller image scales as I find it more visually appealing ... I feel that when I chase larger image scales when the data quality it not quite there, my eyes get distracted by the underlying blurriness. Personal taste, I guess lol.

 

Brilliant (as usual), glad to see you've been able to image Saturn, every bit as good as your Jupiter shots.

 

One question if I may, how do you stack your 7 x 90 sec captures in WinJupos, do you do this as the raw videos or as stacked photos?

 

Thanks, Andrew

Thanks Andrew! My typical processing workflow is:

  • For each capture:
    • Stack the best frames using AutoStakkert (with the number/% frames depending on the quality of the data) with Drizzle set to 3.0x.
    • Perform initial colour adjustment and wavelet sharpening on each stacked image in Registax.
    • Measure each image in WinJUPOS then de-rotate to a single image.
  • Perform some very minor "fine tuning" deconvolution in Astra Image (I find this software allows much more precise control, need at this stage as it's very easy to over-sharpen).
  • Bring the resulting image into Photoshop for final touch-up and colour adjustment.
    • [Edit] After tweaking in Photoshop, I export the final image. At maximum I use 33% scaling, bring it back to the original image scale of the camera. Often, however, I find scaling down further results in a more pleasing image ... around 28-30% seems to suit most captures. 

Edited by DMach, 24 May 2019 - 05:07 AM.

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#14 DMach

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 10:27 AM

Your images make me really optimistic about purchasing my C11 for planetary. I have a lot to learn about the process and plan on spending some time practicing this weekend. Do you have any advice for someone who is inexperienced in planetary imaging?

Hi Jonathan, glad you're feeling good about your C11 - you should be! 

 

I should preface by saying I've only been doing this myself for just over a year - you'll find others on this forum with much more experience and knowledge.

 

It would help to know what other equipment you have besides the C11 ... i.e. what camera you intend to use to capture images/video, do you have a barlow and if so what magnification, what filters you have available, do you have an ADC etc.

 

But the key things general tips I can offer:

  • The C11 needs some attention paid to thermal equilibrium - let it sit outside at ambient temperature for at least 30 mins before trying to collimate and image.
     
  • Invest some time dialling the collimation in and (if this is your first SCT telescope) getting familiar and comfortable with collimation.
     
  • Achieving good focus also takes some practice - unless the seeing is good/excellent, you're trying to focus on a constantly moving target.
     
  • But most importantly, have a go and have fun!  smile.gif  It'll take some time to get the best from your setup, but every step of the journey is rewarding.

Edited by DMach, 23 May 2019 - 04:06 PM.


#15 Billytk

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 02:59 PM

Those are pictures to be proud of.



#16 DMach

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 04:06 PM

Those are pictures to be proud of.

Thanks Billy  :)



#17 oshimitsu

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 10:39 PM

 

Hi Jonathan, glad you're feeling good about your C11 - you should be! 

 

I should preface by saying I've only been doing this myself for just over a year - you'll find others on this forum with much more experience and knowledge.

 

It would help to know what other equipment you have besides the C11 ... i.e. what camera you intend to use to capture images/video, do you have a barlow and if so what magnification, what filters you have available, do you have an ADC etc.

 

But the key things general tips I can offer:

  • The C11 needs some attention paid to thermal equilibrium - let it sit outside at ambient temperature for at least 30 mins before trying to collimate and image.
     
  • Invest some time dialling the collimation in and (if this is your first SCT telescope) getting familiar and comfortable with collimation.
     
  • Achieving good focus also takes some practice - unless the seeing is good/excellent, you're trying to focus on a constantly moving target.
     
  • But most importantly, have a go and have fun!  smile.gif  It'll take some time to get the best from your setup, but every step of the journey is rewarding.

 

I'm gonna try my Skyris 236c but I need to collimate a little more before hand. I'm having a really hard time collimating off of a star. Is there anything I can do to collimate inside if I don't have an artificial star?

 

I also have a 2x and 3x barlow, I plan on only using the 2x ad the 3 would be overkill I think. Sharpcap for capture software and I have a motorized focuser


Edited by oshimitsu, 23 May 2019 - 10:43 PM.


#18 DMach

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 11:53 PM

I'm gonna try my Skyris 236c but I need to collimate a little more before hand. I'm having a really hard time collimating off of a star. Is there anything I can do to collimate inside if I don't have an artificial star?

 

I also have a 2x and 3x barlow, I plan on only using the 2x ad the 3 would be overkill I think. Sharpcap for capture software and I have a motorized focuser

That motorised focuser will definitely make your life easier!

 

Yes, with the 2.8um pixels on the Skyris the 2x barlow would be more appropriate.

 

As for collimation using a real star, that's the only way to go in my opinion - my C11 has enough mirror shift/flop that it throws collimation off slightly (but significantly) if I slew to a different section of the sky. So it's worth spending time getting comfortable with it.

 

Unless I'm really rushed (e.g. clouds approaching) I check and tweak collimation on a nearby star every time I change targets ... maybe a little overkill, but it's so quick to do now that I figure "why not get squeeze out every little bit of detail"?

 

Depending on how far from collimated your scope is, you might need to with a very de-focused star and progressively tweak collimation as you approach focus. Seeing may limit how close you can get to an in-focus collimation check ... and for that, I can't recommend Metaguide highly enough! Provides a very clear assessment of collimation based on the Airy disk, and using your imaging setup instead of a diagonal/eyepiece ... high confidence collimation for imaging.  :)

 

Make sure you thermally equilibrate before attempting to collimate, and consider buying a red filter - this will help reduce the impact of seeing (and atmospheric dispersion).

 

Good luck, look forward to seeing your images!


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#19 Tulloch

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 12:19 AM

OK, MetaGuide, another software package to install and learn how to use! That makes at least 15 programs I've got so far for astrophotography purposes shocked.gif.  Maybe there should be an FAQ for "What software do I need?"

 

Sounds like its a good one though, thanks for the tip. MetaGuide with a red filter, I'll add it to the workflow waytogo.gif ...

 

Thanks again, Andrew




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