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Single Exposure Messier 5110157

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15 replies to this topic

#1 geneva_min

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 11:22 PM

Last night I accidentally slewed during an exposure and it gave me an idea. 

 

I'm sure you guys have already mastered this, but here's my attempt at a single 15 min slewed exposure.  PinWhirlRing?  Ringy PinPool?

 

Exposure times were 8 min Pinwheel, 4 min Whirlpool, 1 min Ring

 

I keep my computer in the house so the other 2 minutes were spent running around like a madman with a lens cap, while impatiently cursing Stellarium and PHD2.  I actually broke a sweat!  
In retrospect, I suppose I could have done a 20 min exposure and added more lens cap time to take the pressure off but what fun would that be?

 

 

PinWhirlRing.jpg


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#2 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 11:28 PM

That is flippin cool! Like a fantasy rearranged universe! I'm not an imager but I think your onto something...

#3 Gipht

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 11:32 PM

I was just starting to learn the location of the various Galaxies and now this.


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#4 TxStars

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 11:49 PM

Heh.. Did this with film back in the 80's.

 

Imagine manual guiding for an hour then capping the scope and moving to a new target and doing another hour and half of manual guiding. Then developing the roll to find out you forgot to advance the film..

 

After the first time you learn to make a check list and follow it.


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#5 Sleep Deprived

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 12:07 AM

What? No Jupiter???

#6 Joshuasnoesky

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 01:32 AM

Nice, have you tried solving thru http://nova.astrometry.net/?


Edited by Joshuasnoesky, 24 May 2019 - 01:33 AM.


#7 schmeah

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 05:21 AM

That’s really cool, but I’m not sure I understand it? Is this like a collage of three separate exposures over 15 minutes with the program jumping from one target to the next? How could the targets and background not be blurred if it was slewing during an exposure?

 

Derek



#8 geneva_min

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 06:39 AM

Schmeah   It really is just one continuous exposure.  It doesn’t show evidence of slewing because I did so with the lens cap on.  The method i used was....when exposure time on target is complete,  1 kill guiding, 2 apply lens cap, 3 slew to next target, 4 restart guiding, 5 remove lens cap

 

SleepD.  It’s funny you joked about Jupiter because I was seriously considering including it but threw out the idea because i figured it would just look like a star and / or I’d screw it up.  To accomplish it and still remain true to the single exposure I thought I could take a large piece of cardboard and cut a thin open slot in the middle leaving enough cardboard on either side to sully cover the aperture.  Slew to Jupiter with the lens cap on.  Remove lens cap with the cardboard covering the scope then quickly snap the open slot past the aperture.  It was late and I couldn’t stay up last night so I scrapped the whole idea.  As I type this I had another thought.  If one could somehow change focal length or even scopes during the exposure one could pull off a pretty cool Jupiter about the same size as the ring nebula in the composition.  



#9 ImNewHere

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 07:22 AM

If there was a section of sky with that set of things IRL it would be one of the most photogenic area up there. Cool concept!

#10 schmeah

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 08:37 AM

Schmeah   It really is just one continuous exposure.  It doesn’t show evidence of slewing because I did so with the lens cap on.  The method i used was....when exposure time on target is complete,  1 kill guiding, 2 apply lens cap, 3 slew to next target, 4 restart guiding, 5 remove lens cap

 

 

That’s insane! Love the creativity! You should do this with many more targets over the course of an evening. The results would be fabulous I bet.

 

Derek



#11 John Miele

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:27 AM

FAKE NEWS!!!...LOL!

#12 BenKolt

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 12:21 PM

I thought the universe was supposed to be expanding!  How did these galaxies and nebula get closer together?

 

Interesting result!  Since we have all these toys, why not play with them?

 

Ben



#13 JP50515

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 12:46 PM

so to clarify, the background stars are those of all 3 locations right?



#14 geneva_min

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 02:23 PM

Yes.  The background is a messed up hodgepodge of all three neighborhoods.  I think that’s why Joshua brought up plate solving.

 

In the lower right I can see NGC5422 which is near the pinwheel and in the lower left I can barely make out IC4263 which is near the whirlpool.  



#15 MikeMiller

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 02:48 PM

This is kind of a throwback to how plate astrophotgraphy used to work. Since photographic plates were expensive, they would expose the same one multiple times in different areas, so the stars did not overlap. This was exceptionally useful for comet hunting, since its possible there would be nothing of interest on the plate if a comet wasn't found.

 

Apparently the plate library at the Allegheny Observatory has a ton of multiple exposed plates that they used to subject graduate students to figuring out what is what on them.



#16 MikeMiller

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 02:49 PM

Nice, have you tried solving thru http://nova.astrometry.net/?

With 3 sets of stars, I think this would make the platesolver cry.




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