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It starts, Space X launches 1st 60 of its 12,000 satellite fleet

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#226 hiMike

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 03:24 PM

Hi All,

 

I was actually able to get out and see the pass, and wow was it one of the most surreal things I've seen in the night sky. I highly recommend getting out after the next launch.

 

Found this website that helped to track the satellites:

https://www.heavens-...ay&alt=0&tz=PST

You'll need to click the top right corner to enter your specific GPS coordinates. Also, the train will be much dimmer by now, so for the full experience you'll want to pay attention for the next launch.

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#227 Starman1

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 04:35 PM

Ah, the end of astrophotography.

I wonder what professionals have to say about this?


Edited by Starman1, 12 November 2019 - 04:35 PM.


#228 Augustus

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 05:48 PM

One of my friends has been monitoring the new sats... they are a couple magnitudes fainter than the first generation ones. Seeing as the first-gen satellites now hover at around 7-8 magnitude these new ones should be at least 10th mag if not dimmer, and the vast majority are only visible in twilight or shortly before/after anyways. I think SpaceX will be able to improve this to get them to even more negligible brightness levels.



#229 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 08:52 PM

Ah, the end of astrophotography.

I wonder what professionals have to say about this?

There's a brief mention on that in this Nature article of November 11. 

 

https://www.nature.c...586-019-03446-y



#230 t_image

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 10:23 PM

One of my friends has been monitoring the new sats... they are a couple magnitudes fainter than the first generation ones. Seeing as the first-gen satellites now hover at around 7-8 magnitude these new ones should be at least 10th mag if not dimmer, and the vast majority are only visible in twilight or shortly before/after anyways. I think SpaceX will be able to improve this to get them to even more negligible brightness levels.

Feel free to support your speculations with demonstrable reasoning and data.

The brightness levels observed are all dependent on timing and location of observers...

 

Are they a couple of magnitudes different as spotted by an observer at the same location with a similar pass from both first 60 and 2nd 60 at the same time of year????

 

Feel free to check heavens-above and calsky's magnitude calculations and then write them and tell them they don't know what they are doing since you think the first gen's "hover at around 7-8 magnitude."

 

I've demonstrated in previous posts with simulations why this thinking is full of ignorance.

Due to the orbital inclination of the first bunch certain lat/longs are more prone,

AND as more orbital planes will be populated this will become more leveled thus covering EVERY range of permutation.

Also the recent train was deployed at an entirely different altitude which doesn't even provide a good standard of comparison yet,

so lots of speculation filled with fluff isn't helpful to anyone.

As well, one fails to consider the orientation v. Nadir of the satellites as the begin to climb to check-out altitude......

Hope that they will all be at 10th magnitude all the time and only visible near twilight/dawn has also been explained as not application in a constellation of Starlinks.

The current launch will continue to climb and will gain in altitude which will extend their sunlit time and the deep nights of winter are very different than summer,

of course the seasons depend on what part of the Earth an observer is on......

 

I only wish that we use sound reasoning with astronomical principles if we are going to opine on how things are going to affect "astronomy."

I don't understand why science goes out the window when amateur obesevers talk about spotting satellites?????



#231 BFaucett

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 01:59 PM

I found this interesting (and a little depressing).

 

‘This Is Not Cool!’ - Astronomers Despair As SpaceX Starlink Train Ruins Observation Of Nearby Galaxies

Nov 18, 2019

FORBES

Jonathan O'Callaghan, Contributor | Science

https://www.forbes.c...earby-galaxies/

 

Bob F. undecided.gif

 



#232 dustyc

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 02:21 PM

So one of these things starts a "Kessler Syndrome" and takes out a lot other satellites, would Space X be on the hook for this? All that orbiting hardware would cost billions to replace.



#233 Klape

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Posted 25 April 2020 - 08:03 AM

Hi, it's been quite a while since the first launchs and I was wondering if some of you are having/had issue with Starlink once they are in there final orbit ? 

Thank you


Edited by Klape, 25 April 2020 - 08:03 AM.


#234 spereira

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Posted 25 April 2020 - 10:41 AM

All you have to do is take a look a these posts:

 

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry10139741

 

https://www.cloudyni...inutes-tonight/

 

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry10125283

 

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry10088324

 

smp



#235 Achernar

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Posted 01 May 2020 - 04:24 AM

Does anyone know how bright they will appear? Irridium flares were cool, but 12,000 shiny things in orbit could get old quick.

I saw at least 20 pass Mobile single file, and all of the were as bright as Polaris. It was startling to say the least.

 

Taras



#236 jrbarnett

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Posted 01 May 2020 - 10:14 PM

The satellites are not very big and do not have large solar panels. Probably invisible.

I think you're right.  A lot less reflective that much of the non-satellite space junk up there even, and small.

 

Best,

 

Jim



#237 jrbarnett

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Posted 01 May 2020 - 10:18 PM

This is end of the photography astronomy.

Extremely doubtful.  The next generation camera chip technology will be as good as the current military grade US night vision technology in terms of light capture and much sharper and more detailed in its presentation.  Images that would take stacking and hours of capture using a high end SBIG camera, for example, will be captured in tens of seconds by the next wave of DSLR imaging chips.  If anything, the rapidity of capture will massively increase the popularity of astronomy over the next 20 years.  Telescopes and eyepieces, though, are likely doomed.  Younger generations associate recreation with electronic and digital devices.  They'll take to easy astro-imaging like ducks to water.  Analog telescopes, though, not so much.

 

Best,

 

Jim



#238 t_image

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Posted 01 May 2020 - 11:05 PM

The satellites are not very big and do not have large solar panels. Probably invisible.

 

 

 

I think you're right.  A lot less reflective that much of the non-satellite space junk up there even, and small.

 

Best,

 

Jim

?????

Just for clarity and precision,

Satellite passes of the same object are more variable in brightness than variable stars.

 

'Reflective' and 'small' don't really apply as many arm chair 'satellite brightness experts' here suppose.. Rescue planes have been signaled by credit card sized objects miles away.

Your thought gilliangin's island needs a football field sized sign for a low flying plane is Hollywood thinking.

 

No need for speculation,

could actually make effort to view same object for a month's worth of passes..

 

 

 

 



#239 gwilson001

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Posted 07 May 2020 - 12:10 AM

Sure, let's add a whole bunch of floating 500lb 'bullets' up there. It's not crowded yet.

No worries of the Kessler cascading domino effect collision syndrome. /sarcasm

We can't even figure out how to clean up all the dead junk we've already sent up there.

 

Can't wait for OneWeb,Telesat, and Amazon to add their thousands up there as well.

All so more people can stare at their phones some more...

 

https://www.space.co...satellites.html

I understand the reasons for creating these intersat-nets, there's huge benefits on a global scale.  But I can't help but see this as a version of dumping trash in the ocean.

When I first heard about the launch of this network I thought, here we go, every country is going to be launching these networks - it will get so dangerous we won't be

willing to risk launching someone up through all of that.  It is possible they don't know the exact location of every piece of space junk that might come into contact with a string of these things and 

send them off on their own. 



#240 earlyriser

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Posted 08 May 2020 - 03:29 PM

Extremely doubtful.  The next generation camera chip technology will be as good as the current military grade US night vision technology in terms of light capture and much sharper and more detailed in its presentation.  Images that would take stacking and hours of capture using a high end SBIG camera, for example, will be captured in tens of seconds by the next wave of DSLR imaging chips.  If anything, the rapidity of capture will massively increase the popularity of astronomy over the next 20 years.  Telescopes and eyepieces, though, are likely doomed.  Younger generations associate recreation with electronic and digital devices.  They'll take to easy astro-imaging like ducks to water.  Analog telescopes, though, not so much.

 

Best,

 

Jim

Then, a decade after they were declared dead, there will be a resurgence of analog telescopes among a new generation of amateur astronomers, much like vinyl records are enjoying today. 



#241 Miranda2525

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Posted 08 May 2020 - 06:19 PM

Some good news here.  praying.gif

https://www.nytimes....-astronomy.html



#242 BigC

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Posted 08 May 2020 - 08:28 PM

Just remember that most people in the world ,including the U.S., couldn't care less about your hobby of astronomy, ham radio, spelunking.....but they do spend Billions of dollars and hours of time watching professional sports which have in common a bunch of highly paid professionals playing  games with a ball.



#243 ensign

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Posted 08 May 2020 - 09:44 PM

Found this in my inbox today:

 

https://skyandtelesc...rlink-visorsat/



#244 Miranda2525

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Posted 12 May 2020 - 06:21 AM

Just remember that most people in the world ,including the U.S., couldn't care less about your hobby of astronomy, ham radio, spelunking.....but they do spend Billions of dollars and hours of time watching professional sports which have in common a bunch of highly paid professionals playing  games with a ball.

Do you really believe they are only for internet? lol.gif
 




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