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A Schoolchild's Delight...

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#1 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 04:10 PM

https://i.imgur.com/USDhYhX.jpg

 

box1.jpg

 

Double-boxed, as expected...

 

box2.jpg

 

box3.jpg



#2 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 04:38 PM

tripod box.jpg

 

tripod.jpg

 

The security-knob for the mount-head isn't captive, and was loose within the box.

 

mount-head box.jpg

 

mount head.jpg

 

...a "Twilight Nano" alt-azimuth.

 

It was only a few weeks ago when I was poring over listings for that mount, just the mount, and as a quick grab-and-go for my smaller telescopes.  When I say "smaller", I mean just that, small, as my largest operational telescope is only 6" in aperture.

 

An empty box...

 

empty box.jpg

 

Would that it had held these within... https://i.imgur.com/NyhZpOT.jpg

 

However, I did receive something else in their stead.


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#3 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 05:06 PM

accessory box.jpg

 

accessories.jpg

 

There's that "something else", at lower-right, and boy is it something else.  Not the usual fare I've encountered within past kits.


Edited by Sky Muse, 24 May 2019 - 05:45 PM.


#4 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 05:49 PM

Maksutov box2.jpg

 

Maksutov.jpg

 

Maksutov2.jpg



#5 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 06:06 PM

I've written many times in the past...

 

"I plan on getting one in future."

"I want one of those, but not one of the other."

"Among the varying apertures of the design, the 127mm Maksutov is the 'sweet spot'; not too small, not too large, just right."

 

...and now the day has arrived...

 

Maksutov3.jpg

 

But before I rip the tissue asunder, let's look more closely at what came with it...


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#6 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 06:56 PM

The threaded end of the mount-head's guiding-rod was a bit wonky upon arrival.  I "warmed" it up with a mini-torch and straightened it...

 

guiding rod.jpg

 

I will not be able to make practical use of this mount until I renovate it with Super Lube and bronze washers.  The motions should be stiff, but requiring little effort to effect.

 

Beware of soft, overseas steel.



#7 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:05 PM

The mount will be treated alone, and within the Mounts forum at a later time.

 

The star-mirror diagonal...

 

star-mirror diagonal2.jpg

 

What little metal there is consists of the back-plate, and the screw for securing an eyepiece.

 

star-mirror diagonal.jpg

 

Given the wall-thickness of that chromed nosepiece, I have to wonder if it will slightly narrow the light-path; perhaps, perhaps not.

 

In any event, I now have a mirrored diagonal with which to experiment, and play.  I won't have to pull out the card and get this exact same one...

 

https://telescope-wa...e-star-diagonal

 

...nor the GSO; for the time being at least.

 

If I had a nickel for every 25mm eyepiece I've received within a kit; granted, I'd still be poor.  I don't use them, as I prefer a 20mm, but this one is a Plossl, allegedly fully multi-coated, and it even comes with its own star clusters...

 

25mm Plossl.jpg

 

...then, if I didn't know better, a vampire-star to boot, there near the center.

 

The red-dot-finder; the battery's good...

 

red-dot finder.jpg

 

Of all the accessories, I've saved what is, arguably, the best for last: the "dumbphone" holder.  I have one of those phones, albeit against my will, and it has a camera(of course), but I don't think it's very good.  In any event, I'll give it a whirl in future; why not...

 

'dumbphone' holder.jpg

 

It is stated somewhere within the accompanying literature not to leave the phone attached too long, as the suction-cups will eventually fail to hold on to the phone.

 

Next up, the telescope itself...


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#8 Jaimo!

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 10:38 PM

applause.gif Happy New Scope Day, Alan!


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#9 jks2000

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 12:23 AM

Just like Christmas! Congrats on the shiny new acquisition, can't wait to hear about first light!
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#10 Sky Muse

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 04:13 AM

Just like Christmas! Congrats on the shiny new acquisition, can't wait to hear about first light!

 

applause.gif Happy New Scope Day, Alan!

Thanks to you both!  It's been a long time coming.  

 

And now for the main course, the Maksutov itself...

 

OTA.jpg

 

Hmm... https://cdn.shopify....pg?v=1526392591

 

Funny thing, or perhaps not, but that's the only information on the OTA: "Explore® FirstLight"; no specs label, nothing else.  The one-sheet, double-sided "manual" isn't specific either...

 

manual sheet.jpg

 

This is the only instance that identifies it, and on the outer box...

 

specs.jpg

 

...and on the receipt as well.  The link to the vendor will eventually expire, so instead I'll state that the kit was purchased for $299 from B&H Photo of New York, plus state-tax, yet with free 2-day shipping via FedEx.

 

The telescope is manufactured by Jinghua Optics & Electronics Co., Ltd. of China, who have been in business since 1997.  It seems that Synta started out at around that time as well.

 

In any event, back to show-and-tell...<grumble grumble grumble>...

 

The telescope has a plastic, locking dust-cap...

 

dust cap.jpg

 

The coatings seem nice and uniform...

 

coatings.jpg

 

OTA4.jpg

 

OTA2.jpg

 

OTA3.jpg


Edited by Sky Muse, 25 May 2019 - 04:18 AM.

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#11 Sky Muse

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 04:53 AM

The rear of the Maksutov, and where one day I may need to...<gulp>...collimate it...

 

OTA5.jpg

 

I took the plug out, and snapped a shot directly through...

 

collimation - 052419.jpg

 

That appears collimated to me, and nigh perfect.  An eventual star-test will verify that.

 

The infamous, flared secondary-baffle I've been reading about...

 

secondary baffle.jpg

 

If I understood correctly, the telescope is somewhat optimised for daytime/terrestrial observations, instead of that of night.  I'll be looking into that further.  After all, I feel a blackening and flocking coming on. evillaugh.gif

 

The primary-baffle...

 

primary baffle.jpg

 

It appears ribbed, strange, and straight out of a sci-fi flick.

 

The base for the red-dot finder...

 

finder base.jpg

 

I understand that that can be easily replaced with a Vixen-style.

 

This is rather interesting.  I inserted my Celestron star-prism diagonal into the 1.25" visual-back, for a sense of scale.  Incidentally, the diagonal barely went in; very tight.  Usually it's the other way around, and with 1.26" fittings.  I have some of those.  But the thing that really struck me, and full of hope and promise, is that the telescope seems to be equipped with a 2" male-thread...

 

visual back.jpg

 

visual back2.jpg  

 

Yes, very interesting.

 

First-light will be when it will be.  I will not take it out until I have a dew-shield for it; home-made if necessary, but it's not going be made with this stuff...

 

dew shield3.jpg

 

...and that that I had made for the Celestron C90.


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#12 Sky Muse

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 03:50 AM

Jupiter's up at this hour, and the Maksutov is ready to set sail on its maiden light...

 

Maksutov5.jpg

 

Only what came with the telescope is attached, including the mirrored diagonal.  But that diagonal will eventually be forbidden, taboo, to interact with the telescope, and a star-prism to be utilised from there on out, in its stead.

 

There's one problem however.  I don't have an in-a-pinch dew-shield, and the telescope is not going outside without one. 

 

I have these sheets of matte-black art-paper...

 

art paper.jpg


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#13 Sky Muse

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 04:14 AM

How's that...

 

dew shield.jpg

 

...not bad, eh?


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#14 Sky Muse

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 08:53 AM

The Maksutov's first-light is completed...

 

First light - 052619c.jpg

 

It may be difficult to tell within those two images, but the telescope is mounted upside-down, and upon my Astro-Tech Voyager I alt-azimuth.  I'll need to reverse the arm and eyepiece-tray, and exercise my spatial-ability to determine whether or not to remove the pier in addition.  I will also be giving it a whirl one day upon my EQ-2.  We'll see how that goes.

 

The very first thing I saw with the bundled 25mm was Jupiter out-of-focus.  The pattern revealed a SPOT-ON collimation.  I saw no deviation of the black spot from the center of the white spot whatsoever.  I will be taking a photo of that pattern when I train the telescope onto Polaris, which doesn't move.  Polaris is one of my most favourite of stars; not because it's stationary, but because it is at least a double- if not a triple-star system.

 

I brought out my 2002 Minolta DiMAGE F100(a whopping 4 megapixels) point-and-shoot.  For seventeen years I've had that camera, yet just within the last few days I finally found out how to adjust the speed of the shutter.  As a result, I was able to take this not-too-shoddy portrait of Jove...

 

Jupiter - 052619c.jpg

 

You can barely make out just one moon there at the planet's upper-left.  Jupiter was in motion, which is why it's not that sharp, but that is, by leaps and by bounds, the best afocal shot I've ever taken of a planet.  I have always taken photographs through my telescopes by holding  a small point-and-shoot camera up to an eyepiece with my hands and snapping a shot, on the fly, and this morning's session was no exception.

 

Here, I've taken that same image and brightened it to reveal two moons this time; still a bit faint however...

 

Jupiter - 052619ca.jpg

 

Of course, during the live view I saw all four.

 

I then took the telescope inside, moved the mount to another area, brought the telescope back outside, and...

 

Moon - 052619.jpg

 

The Moon was that colour in the sky at the time; organic in appearance, as though it were breathing in and out, and digesting its breakfast...

 

Moon - 052619b.jpg

 

Moon - 052619c.jpg

 

I used several eyepieces, zoomed in and out with the camera, for observing and taking the shots.  I did see some ghosting and glaring at times, but I don't exactly know what's causing it.  Probably this...

 

star-mirror diagonal2.jpg

 

The next outing, I'll bring out the Celestron star-prism, which I had blackened and flocked, and make comparisons.  If the difference between the diagonals is noticeable, I'll take photos to illustrate that very thing.  The Maksutov itself will be enhanced in future, absolutely, but I just don't know at this point how urgently it requires it.  I do know that the two baffles are going to be a lot of fun.


Edited by Sky Muse, 26 May 2019 - 09:28 AM.

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#15 Sky Muse

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 08:43 PM

It's show-and-tell again...<grumble grumble grumble>...

 

The mounting-arm and eyepiece-tray of the Astro-Tech Voyager I alt-azimuth have been reversed; configured to the Maksutov's orientation, as that will be its digs for the time being...

 

ATVI mount18 - reversed2.jpg

 

The eyepiece-tray is upside-down now, which I prefer less, but it is what it is, and how it will have to be.  

 

The shaky, wiggly, red-dot finder is now right-side up, albeit at an angle.  I need one of those 8x or 9x, 50mm, right-angle finderscopes...

 

Maksutov7.jpg

 

I read somewhere where adding springs might stiffen it up some.  I may look into that.

 

Oh no, even in the daytime I can't lay the meniscus bare to the micro flora and fauna whizzing round...

 

Maksutov8.jpg

 

I attempted a comparison between the bundled star-mirror and the Celestron star-prism, but it was a bit breezy out, off and on, so I gave up on that.  I'll need Polaris, or a stationary man-made target for that.  I then took this out of a plastic toolbox I got at Wal-Mart: my 10mm 70° Astro-Tech "Titan"...

 

A-T 10mm 70° Titan4.jpg

 

It's still around, and unto this day... https://agenaastro.c...a-eyepiece.html

 

By that time, I was only interested in testing the optics, and with the Celestron star-prism.  My only subjects were distant tree leaves, lots of them, some sunlit, some not.  At 190x, I took this afocal shot through the 10mm after a breeze had subsided, but not to a perfect stillness, nor that of my hands grasping the camera.  You know how temperamental cameras are about those sorts of things...

 

10mm 70° - 190x.jpg

 

The image was reduced in size, and sharpened to attempt to match that of the live view; no brightening or contrasting was performed. 

 

Of course, as always, during the live view it appeared even better than that, sharper, as the eye and mind may follow a moving subject far more easily.

 

Still, today's performance warrants a check on the collimation, for being that this is a reflector all the more so.

 

Incidentally, the 1.25" visual-back is just that, ever so slightly tighter even, and definitely not one of those sloppy 1.26" ones.  I have some of those.  


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#16 Sky Muse

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 06:55 AM

This early morning, the Moon was rising, but as it ascended it appeared as though it had fallen into a bowl of chicken broth, and floating just beneath the surface, so I didn't bother with it.  Later, by the time the Sun amply lit up the sky, I could still see the Moon well enough, but I knew that it wouldn't be able to outrun the Sun before it became invisible, and before reaching the southern point of its trajectory.

 

Weather-wise, a tattered sheet of hazy clouds wafted over my digs the entire time I was out, but I managed to get an afocal shot of Polaris, at 190x, and with the 10mm 70° ocular...the "Titan"...

 

Polaris - 052719.jpg

 

It could've been brighter, if not for the haze; or, its smaller companion was partially eclipsing it.

 

I then threw the star out-of-focus, and a lovely pattern appeared, yet quite dim.  I took ten hand-held snapshots through the eyepiece in an effort to capture the pattern.  All but one were duds.  The one...

 

Polaris - 052719c.jpg

 

You can barely see it, but it is there.  Here, I've brightened and contrasted the same image...

 

Polaris - 052719b.jpg

 

Now, that's with my roulette-wheel star-prism in place.  I've yet to do a straight-through shot, which will be forthcoming.  Afterwards, I didn't have anything better else to do, so I subjected the image to various effects within my paint programme...

 

"Texture"...

 

Polaris - Texture.jpg

 

"Sculpture"...

 

Polaris - Sculpture.jpg

 

"Kaleidoscope"...

 

Polaris - Kaleidoscope.jpg

 

"Colorise"...

 

Polaris - Colorise.jpg

 

By the way, it appears that I have a loose focussing knob as well.  It hasn't fallen off, and I was able to tighten its set-screw, but only slightly, and with a 1.5mm hex-key.  As I understand, it takes a 1.3mm instead.  I don't want to wait on a specialised Wiha set.  I may even replace the knob outright, in future.  I could take a diamond-wheel to the 1.5mm...  

 

 


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#17 Sky Muse

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 02:44 AM

Acclimation...

 

acclimation.jpg

 

If there's one thing above all that a Maksutov teaches, it's patience.



#18 Sky Muse

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 07:23 AM

This time round I did not use the Celestron star-prism, observing in straight-through fashion instead.  The intra-focal and extra-focal patterns of Polaris, at 95x with a 20mm, did not appear any different from those of the night before with the star-prism in place, appearing perfectly concentric as before.  Therefore, I don't dare touch the collimation.  Also, I now know that the roulette-wheel star-prism landed on at least a modest jackpot as it left the factory.

 

In focus, at 190x with the 10mm, on both mornings, I could see the Airy disc of Polaris sharply, and at least two diffraction-rings encircling it, but the seeing, at Pickering 6, from fair to good, mucked the view up a bit, with annoying rays dancing within and about the rings.  By that time there were a number of cloudlets rolling across the sky.

 

I then picked up the mount, with the telescope still attached, and moved it northward about ten paces, set it down, spun the telescope round towards the south and, "By Jove!"  I saw only three of the the planet's moons this time.  Jupiter itself, at 190x, was rather illuminated, like a 40-watt bulb, but all I could see were the two usual features, equatorial bands, and nothing else.  I felt that the planet was bright enough to introduce the variable-polariser, and in the hopes of seeing greater detail.  I'll have to test that one night. 

 

Overall, whilst observing, I saw no flares jutting out from the planet's surface, and from these...

 

Synta grey.jpg

 

...those being of my 6" f/5 Newtonian.  I think I'm going to enjoy this Maksutov a lot as a result, and for several other reasons besides. 

 

Until this acquisition, all I had experienced were designs of telescopes from the 1600s.  But this is one is new-fangled, from the 1940s, and a most welcome addition.



#19 Sky Muse

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 06:19 AM

To this day, there is not a single image online of this kit in toto; only from the mount-head of the "Twilight Nano" up.  For perspective, I wanted to do a photo-shoot of the kit as it came, as I had not taken a single OEM shot before, until now.  The Explore Scientific 127mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain upon its bundled "Twilight Nano" alt-azimuth...

 

kit3.jpg

 

It's within that shot that the telescope seems to overwhelm the mount.

 

kit2.jpg

 

The telescope and mount appear better-matched, there, and here...

 

kit4.jpg

 

The "cockpit"...

 

kit5.jpg

 

I did swap out the original finder-base for a Vixen-type, as shown, as I plan on using a finder-scope instead.  The red-dot finder that came with the kit is a travesty, but I think I can fix it, and then to be used with other telescopes.

 


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#20 Sky Muse

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 06:44 AM

I've yet to conduct a second-light with this telescope, and due to my taking my sweet time in deciding upon a dew-shield, which is an absolute must.

 

This is Farpoint's dew-shield for the Celestron C5 Schmidt...

 

 https://farpointastr...tron-5-5se-sct/

 

...$20, and with free shipping; can't beat that.  Who needs Astrozap?  This one is every bit as good, and it fits this Maksutov to a "T"...

 

dew shield4.jpg

 

dew shield2.jpg

 

dew shield3.jpg

 

I suspect that it will also fit the Meade 125mm f/15 Maksutovs, as long as the outer diameter there at the front is 5.75" or so.  The diameter of this Maksutov is 5 and 13/16" in diameter; 1/16" over 5.75".

 

It seems to be constructed well...

 

dew shield5.jpg

 

If anyone else has this same telescope, or the Meade version perhaps, then you've a great and economical option for a dew-shield.

 

I don't when the second-light will occur.  It rained a little yesterday, and right after my having finished the renovation of the bundled alt-azimuth.  I don't want to take it out into the humidity, even with the new dew-shield, so stay tuned...


Edited by Sky Muse, 14 August 2019 - 06:55 AM.

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#21 Chris Y

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 01:04 PM

@Sky Muse

 

Thanks for posting this info on the ES 127 Mak.  Since I'm a total newb to astronomy, it's very reassuring to have someone with your obvious level of experience have positive things to say about it.  I have the 152 Mak on the Twilight I and I love it.  I thought maybe I was just happy with mine because it's my first scope, but the pictures and narratives you've posted verify the things I've found with mine; good collimation and bright views.

 

It was extremely reassuring when you mentioned thinking about using your variable polarizer to dim Jupiter a bit, because I had the same experience with the intensity of Saturn's brightness a few weeks ago and thought about using my variable polarizer to dim it a bit.  So that tells me that I'm not totally daft after all!

 

One difference I noticed is that the RDF base on your 127 is different than the one that came on my 152.  The 152 has the ES “T” base.

 

Cheers, and thanks again for posting this!

 

Chris


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#22 Sky Muse

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 11:55 PM

@Sky Muse

 

Thanks for posting this info on the ES 127 Mak.  Since I'm a total newb to astronomy, it's very reassuring to have someone with your obvious level of experience have positive things to say about it.  I have the 152 Mak on the Twilight I and I love it.  I thought maybe I was just happy with mine because it's my first scope, but the pictures and narratives you've posted verify the things I've found with mine; good collimation and bright views.

 

It was extremely reassuring when you mentioned thinking about using your variable polarizer to dim Jupiter a bit, because I had the same experience with the intensity of Saturn's brightness a few weeks ago and thought about using my variable polarizer to dim it a bit.  So that tells me that I'm not totally daft after all!

 

One difference I noticed is that the RDF base on your 127 is different than the one that came on my 152.  The 152 has the ES “T” base.

 

Cheers, and thanks again for posting this!

 

Chris

Thanks.  I removed the ES finder-base, and installed a more versatile Vixen-style in its place, but I need to strengthen the connection before I call it done.  The back cover is of plastic, and with threaded holes into same for the finder-base.  It will need a thin aluminum plate over the other side and nuts installed, although I haven't taken the cover off yet to explore the possibilities.  With the new finder-base I can attach any finder, whether a red-dot or a finder-scope.  To remove the cover, the focussing-knob and the visual-back will need to be removed; no problem.

 

It's interesting that you chose a Maksutov for your first, as the focal-length is rather long, and upon a manual mount to boot.  My 127mm has the same focal-length as yours.  Still, I'm able to find things easily enough with it on a manual mount, and without a finder even, but only the brightest objects of course.  Simply scanning the sky within the perimeter of a constellation is another option.  The surprises are part of the fun.

 

I don't expect to need my polariser for dimming, I don't think.  I'll find that out after I observed with it regularly; although I haven't even begun to, as I just received a proper dew-shield for it a few days ago.

 

Why, I haven't even snapped an afocal shot of the Moon yet with it. smile.gif

 

But then, I do hope it proves to be more that just another telescope for viewing the Moon. lol.gif   

 

The one thing that struck me almost immediately was the fluid ease by which I was able to scale ever upwards in magnification, even as if the telescope was compelling me to do so.  In that, this one suits me best.


Edited by Sky Muse, 15 August 2019 - 12:00 AM.


#23 Sky Muse

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 10:06 AM

The second-light was conducted early this morning.  First, the Moon, as I had yet to take a shot of fair Luna...

 

081519 - Moon.jpg

 

The Moon appears full here, at 63x with the Vixen 30mm NPL Plossl, but it's actually a waxing-gibbous, and perhaps the last night or two for the phase...

 

Moon - 081519-30mm Vixen.jpg

 

Happily, I saw no false-colour whatsoever.  The Moon practically fills the eyepiece at near the lowest power possible with this telescope; definitely no wide-field views out of this one, and to my delight.  Through the Tani 20mm Erfle, and at 95x...

 

Moon - 081519-20mm Erfle.jpg

 

Through the Astro-Tech 10mm "Titan", and at 190x...

 

Moon - 081519-10mm Titan.jpg

 

At one point, I inserted my Tani 4mm orthoscopic, and for "475x Power!", just like a Tasco, or a Barska, telescope.  I did see what very few people have ever seen at that power: a distinct sliver or two of black shadowing within the craters along the rim, yet swimmingly so.  So much for that.    

 

Incidentally, the seeing was at about Pickering 6 to 7, and the telescope upon the bundled "Twilight Nano" alt-azimuth was shake-city, particularly at the higher powers.  Now I know why the factory binds and thickly-greases up the axes of these mounts before shipping them out.  In renovating the mount, I re-greased and adjusted the tension for the axes, but they're not loose and sloppy, falling apart, not at all.  It's simply that the mount is not suitable for this size and weight of a telescope.  Of course, I think we all know that already, and simply by viewing an image of the combination.  But no matter in my case, as I have other mounts, and smaller telescopes to make use of this mount; win-win.

 

Next up on the celestial menu, an old favourite, Polaris, and at 95x...

 

Polaris - 081519-20mm Erfle.jpg

 

Now, that image is nowhere near the detail I saw live.  I could see the star's diffraction-rings, blade-like, and its Airy disc somewhat.  Also, to the NW of the star, per the view through the telescope, Polaris B.  I've not seen B with any of my telescopes for quite some time, but there it was, a sharp dot of light.  I like Polaris' slightly creamy, yellowish shade; and the fact that it doesn't move. lol.gif

 

Lastly, I turned the telescope to the south-southwest...

 

081519 - Saturn.jpg

 

...and there, about 20° or less above the horizon, in descent towards the west, Saturn, and at 190x...

 

Saturn - 081519-6mm Vixen.jpg

 

You can see the globe, and rings, albeit smeared somewhat.

 

It was sharper of course during the live view, but no discerning Cassini's Division, not with it that low in the sky.  I'll have to try again as the planet ascends upwards out of the east rather.

 

I did see "Titan", and to the north-northeast of the planet, and it didn't disappear when I stared directly at it.  That was nice. 

 

I then popped in the Vixen 6mm NPL Plossl, and observed Saturn at a whopping 317x.  I could make out the planet well enough.  I could see what I call the "Double Ds", but with the shaky mount I couldn't keep it in view long enough to study it.  I did want to keep it OEM during this light, but never again with the bundled mount.  I need to finalise the renovation of my Meade "Large Equatorial", an EQ-2, and tack on the Celestron 9V-battery motor-drive that I've yet to use.  Then we'll see what this puppy can do, and at...

 

..."500x!", perhaps. 

 

In addition, I feel a blackening and flocking coming on for this telescope, along with a modification of its secondary-baffle.

 

By the way, when focussing at the higher powers, I noticed no flop nor shift.  Perhaps JOC fixed that prior to receiving my sampling.  Still, I'll be checking for that issue further in future, as there's little I like to do more than to break these mechanical aspects down and "fix" them.


Edited by Sky Muse, 15 August 2019 - 12:04 PM.

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#24 CeeKay

CeeKay

    Vostok 1

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  • Joined: 03 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Vancouver, WA

Posted 15 August 2019 - 07:00 PM

Sky Muse - I have the Bresser version of the same scope and saw that you replaced the RDF that came with it with a vixen-style base.  Which one did you get and what type of finderscope are you planning to use?   Got to agree with you that the RDF that came with it leave quite a bit to be desired.

 

Chris


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#25 Chris Y

Chris Y

    Sputnik

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  • Joined: 05 Nov 2018
  • Loc: Bortle 7 - Wichita, Kansas, USA

Posted 15 August 2019 - 07:51 PM

 

It's interesting that you chose a Maksutov for your first, as the focal-length is rather long, and upon a manual mount to boot.  My 127mm has the same focal-length as yours.  Still, I'm able to find things easily enough with it on a manual mount, and without a finder even, but only the brightest objects of course.  Simply scanning the sky within the perimeter of a constellation is another option.  The surprises are part of the fun.

 

I needed a short OTA with an aft focuser, and the rings/bracket on the 152 was a definite plus for me.  I use to work with avionics and I've seen enough electronic malfunctions that I wanted my first mount to be completely mechanical for reliability.

 

My 35MM Bresser 70° gives me a TFOV of 1.29°, and that has worked out so far.  However, my GSO 8x50 RACI hasn't seen first light yet, and with 5.4° FOV, I will probably feel like I'm jumping into the ocean rather than a local watering hole.

 

Edit:  I made the mistake of trying to use the RDF twice.  The problem was that once I got down to look through a straight through finder, I almost couldn't get back up onto my observing seat, which is my mobility scooter.

 

Chris


Edited by Chris Y, 16 August 2019 - 09:17 AM.

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