Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Favourite Summer DSOs?

observing dso astrophotography
  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Naraya

Naraya

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 124
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2018
  • Loc: Jakarta, Indonesia

Posted 26 May 2019 - 09:08 AM

Hey guys!

 

So next month i'm planning to go on an astronomy trip (with a buddy) to a good level 3 sky (Grey on the light pollution map) in the southern edges of Sumatra, Indonesia

 

 

Screen Shot 2019 05 26 At 20.58.19
I will bring the following equipment there:

5" Skywatcher dob

Orion 80mm Refractor

Vortex 8x42 Binoculars

Nikon Camera(s)

 

 

This'll be the first time I will bring the dob and refractor to a really dark sky

 

So I thought i needed to maximise that time by compiling the best summer DSOs i can observe! (with my equipment of course)

 

What do you guys think we should observe first? A tier list would be pretty cool but I will write all the great ones down in preparation for the trip

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clear skies!


Edited by Naraya, 26 May 2019 - 09:15 AM.

  • Procyon and azfar72 like this

#2 Keith Rivich

Keith Rivich

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1518
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2011
  • Loc: Cypress, Tx

Posted 26 May 2019 - 04:11 PM

If you haven't done them yet knock out the Messier's. Can't go wrong with the Messier's...


  • Procyon likes this

#3 Inkswitch

Inkswitch

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 256
  • Joined: 09 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Walhonding, OH USA

Posted 26 May 2019 - 06:30 PM

NGC 7000, aka North America Nebula.  Also, NGC 6960 and the other named parts of the Veil Nebula.  When you come back, in your observing report, give us your impression on the difference between the globulars M13 and M22.



#4 chrysalis

chrysalis

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 19265
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2013
  • Loc: North Central NC

Posted 27 May 2019 - 05:11 AM

Knowing which constellations will be accessible to you, use this website to generate lists of objects:

 

http://www.virtualcolony.com/sac/

 

If you are not sure what constellations are available, use this website:

 

http://tonightssky.com/MainPage.php


  • Procyon likes this

#5 Ernest_SPB

Ernest_SPB

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1295
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2010
  • Loc: St.-Petersburg, Russia

Posted 27 May 2019 - 06:53 AM

It can be great trip for you!

 

The most reach with DSO will be for your location the following south constellations: Carina, Vela, Centaurus, Lupus, Virgo, Scorpius, Sagittarius - select targets from them in first priority  


  • Procyon, Vondragonnoggin and Tyson M like this

#6 Ken Watts

Ken Watts

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 132
  • Joined: 19 Sep 2016
  • Loc: Sun City, Az

Posted 27 May 2019 - 09:02 AM

Last summer I traveled to a dark area, saw the Milky Way.... I spent a LOT of time just naked eye observing.  Don't forget to take in the wide view! There is so much to see, spend some time with low power just sweeping.


  • zleonis likes this

#7 WyattDavis

WyattDavis

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 963
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Rye, NH

Posted 28 May 2019 - 04:58 AM

Sounds fun! The advice on the Messier catalog is good, and I am envious of your 0 degrees of latitude and access to the Southern skies. I'm not sure exactly when you are going but the full moon is up almost all night on June 15, so hopefully you are timing this trip for when you can get some true darkness. For example, things look much better circa June 7.

 

Anyway, from up here in Winterfell, the idea of having Scorpius and Sagittarius transiting at 70 degrees of altitude is mighty tempting. I would be heading there for sure around 1am for transits of all of the amazing - Messier and non-Messier - nebulae, globs, star clusters, and broad swaths of Milky Way. That part of the sky is binocular and ST80 Nirvana. Be sure and take along a zero-gravity recliner a UHC filter for the many bodacious bright nebulae there.

 

For non-Messier, all of the star clusters around Zeta 1 & 2 Scorpii are good and will look great in wide fields in your instruments. The entire region around M24 over Sagittarius is wonderful - look for NGC 6603 embedded in M24. In Centaurus, two easy recommendations would be NGC5139 - the Mighty Omega Centauri - and Centaurus A (NGC 5128). At moonset on June 7, Omega Centauri will be at 41 degrees of altitude in the South - not to be missed!

 

Let us know what you end up tracking down.



#8 Naraya

Naraya

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 124
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2018
  • Loc: Jakarta, Indonesia

Posted 28 May 2019 - 10:02 AM

dang, I feel bad for you northerners, you can't experience the beauty of the milky way right above your head in a dark sky!

 

Anyways, here is what I compiled

 

Planetary Nebulae:

1)Dumbell

2)Ring

 

Nebulae:

1)Veil nebula

2)North america nebula

3)Lagoon nebula

4)eagle nebula

5)Omega nebula

6)Trifid nebula

7)Blue horsehead nebula

 

Globulars:

1)Omega Centauri

2)M13

3)m22

4)m5

5)m92

6)m71

Clusters:

1)wild duck cluster

2)Ptolemy's cluster

3)small sagitarius star cloud

4)black swan cluster

5)butterfly cluster

 

Galaxies:

Dont know too much about them, any suggestions?


Edited by Naraya, 28 May 2019 - 10:02 AM.


#9 Steve Cox

Steve Cox

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1403
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2017

Posted 28 May 2019 - 05:22 PM

I have many, but when they're up, these three it seems I have to look at each night I'm out.

 

M6 - Butterfly Cluster

M7 - Ptolemy's Cluster

M11 - Wild Duck Cluster

 

After those three, then it's mostly M13 and about anything in Cygnus.



#10 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16853
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 28 May 2019 - 08:24 PM

dang, I feel bad for you northerners, you can't experience the beauty of the milky way right above your head in a dark sky!

 

Anyways, here is what I compiled

 

Planetary Nebulae:

1)Dumbell

2)Ring

 

Nebulae:

1)Veil nebula

2)North america nebula

3)Lagoon nebula

4)eagle nebula

5)Omega nebula

6)Trifid nebula

7)Blue horsehead nebula

 

Globulars:

1)Omega Centauri

2)M13

3)m22

4)m5

5)m92

6)m71

Clusters:

1)wild duck cluster

2)Ptolemy's cluster

3)small sagitarius star cloud

4)black swan cluster

5)butterfly cluster

 

Galaxies:

Dont know too much about them, any suggestions?

July isn't a great time of year for galaxies, because the Milky Way blocks them from view. Probably better to concentrate on star clusters and nebulae.



#11 kfiscus

kfiscus

    Baltic Birch Dob Bases

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 6518
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Albert Lea, MN, USA

Posted 28 May 2019 - 10:30 PM

All of the following are great with nebula filters and dark adaption:

Helix

Crescent

Eagle

Trifid

Lagoon

Swan/Omega



#12 Redbetter

Redbetter

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7428
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Central Valley, CA

Posted 28 May 2019 - 11:42 PM

This is from the perspective of a northern hemisphere observer looking for objects that are (mostly) not already on the list, but will be visible there:

 

Since you will be a few degrees south of the equator, you might be able to catch the Small Magellanic Cloud in the pre-dawn hours, along with 47 Tucanae.  They should reach about 20+ degrees.  Pavo globular NGC 6752 will be at about 35 degrees in the middle of the night.  There are quite a few globulars that should be bright but are below the horizon here.

 

There are likely some southern galaxies worth catching in the early morning hours.  One that comes to mind is IC 5152 in Indus.   While it isn't overly bright, it is a Local Group member that is too far south to see from up here--it will just barely clear the horizon where I am now.  It should reach 40+ degrees down there.  It might be a bit of a challenge to see much of it with the 5" since it is just brighter than 11 mag. 

 

In the early evening there will be Centaurus A galaxy which should be spectacular.  There is also the near edge on NGC 4945 in Centaurus and NGC 5102 (iota's Ghost).  NGC 6744, an 8+ mag spiral galaxy in Pavo, will also reach over 30 degrees around midnight. 

 

Sculptor has some fine galaxies for the pre-dawn hours, NGC 300, NGC 55, NGC 7793 and of course, NGC 253 (the Silver Dollar galaxy).    There is also the impressive globular NGC 288 near NGC 253.  These objects are pretty low up here. 

 

And of course, you should catch Eta Carina early because it will be getting low.


  • Dave Mitsky, WyattDavis and Tyson M like this

#13 Naraya

Naraya

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 124
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2018
  • Loc: Jakarta, Indonesia

Posted 29 May 2019 - 01:37 AM

Updated:

 

Planetary Nebulae:

1)Dumbell

2)Ring

3)helix nebula

 

Nebulae:

1)Veil nebula

2)North america nebula

3)Lagoon nebula

4)eagle nebula

5)Omega nebula

6)Trifid nebula

7)Blue horsehead nebula

 

Globulars:

1)Omega Centauri

2)M13

3)m22

4)m5

5)m92

6)m71

 

Clusters:

1)wild duck cluster

2)Ptolemy's cluster

3)Butterfly cluster

4)black swan cluster

5)small sagittarius star cloud

 

Galaxies:

1)ngc 6744

2)


  • WyattDavis and Steve Cox like this

#14 WyattDavis

WyattDavis

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 963
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Rye, NH

Posted 29 May 2019 - 02:46 AM

That's a great list. My only caveat is that I think the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud (M24, right?) should earn a category of its own:  Star Cloud! 



#15 Araguaia

Araguaia

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1432
  • Joined: 31 Aug 2018
  • Loc: deepest, darkest Brazil

Posted 30 May 2019 - 08:48 AM

Galaxies:

 

Centaurus A - it will peak right above Omega Centauri

M83 - should be mind-blowing

NGC 4945 - a bright edge-on with a dark lane

 

Planetaries:

 

Bug nebula in the hook of the Scorpion's tail

NGC 6440, which forms a pretty pair with the glob NGC 6445

 

And don't miss the Carina Nebula!  It won't be too high in the sky, but should still look amazing.  While you are there check out the lovely clusters to port and starboard of it, Wishing Well and Gem.  The Jewel Box cluster in Crux is also worth a look if it is clear near the southern horizon.  


  • Tyson M, Redbetter and Naraya like this

#16 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 78438
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 01 June 2019 - 01:08 PM

 

Galaxies:

Dont know too much about them, any suggestions?

NGC 6822 (Barnard's Galaxy) in northeastern Sagittarius comes to mind.  The planetary nebula NGC 6818 (the Little Gem Nebula) lies nearby.

 

NGC 5189 (the Spiral Planetary Nebula) in Musca might be doable.

 

Dave Mitsky


  • Redbetter likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: observing, dso, astrophotography



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics