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Meade nebular filter

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#1 shadowpdiggity

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 10:00 AM

I was given this filter as a gift and i am not to sure how to use it. I am just getting started in astrophotography and i have seen where filters are used for different types of results. Any advise would be appreciated.

#2 shadowpdiggity

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 12:06 PM

I should add i have an 8"sct from meade that i use on my avx mount. I just purchased a zwo asi224mc camera and the asiair to run everything. My main question is does this filter help with lp and will it help in getting better detail in any images i try to capture.

#3 sg6

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 12:24 PM

You want this: https://www.meade.co...lar_filters.htm

 

The filter passes OIII and Hb area then block longer wavelengths until Ha which it passes.

The light pollution bit should get blocked, the page above shows the LP sources as blocked - High and Low Pressure Sodium and Mercury vapour wavelengths.

 

How well they actually block I do not know. The filter is a fairly standard nebula filter

 

What you will find is that images will obviously only get the passed wavelengths, so blue/green and some red (Ha). Greens, Yellows, Oranges and shorter Reds will not get to the sensor.

 

So unsure how to define "greater detail".

What it should do is block the general background and leave the main emission lines and so you get better contrast.

 

One aspect is that a filter removes stuff, the resultant image is therefore dimmer and the scope you have is slow and the long focal length therefore creates a larger but dimmer image and the filter reduces any image further. For imaging you will need to apply greater care/thought.



#4 shadowpdiggity

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 02:33 PM

So what i am hearing you say is if i use this for photography i will need longer / more exposures to achieve good results.


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