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Tuesday Night's Jovian Events

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#1 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:41 PM

A number of Galilean satellite events will take place tonight beginning about 2:22 UT (10:22 p.m. EDT).

 

02:22 UT, Io begins transit of Jupiter.

02:24 UT, Io's shadow begins to cross Jupiter.

03:24 UT, Ganymede begins transit of Jupiter.

03:30 UT, Ganymede's shadow begins to cross Jupiter.

03:30 UT, ** A multi-shadow transit event begins. **

04:34 UT, Io ends transit of Jupiter.

04:38 UT, Io's shadow leaves Jupiter's disk.

04:38 UT, ** The multi-shadow transit event ends. **

05:44 UT, Ganymede ends transit of Jupiter.

05:56 UT, Ganymede's shadow leaves Jupiter's disk.

 

https://www.skyandte...cript-utility/#

 

I : Tra start: 12 Jun 2019 2:21

I : Sha start: 12 Jun 2019 2:23

III: Tra start: 12 Jun 2019 3:27

III: Sha start: 12 Jun 2019 3:32

I : Tra end : 12 Jun 2019 4:33

I : Sha end : 12 Jun 2019 4:35

III: Tra end : 12 Jun 2019 5:39

III: Sha end : 12 Jun 2019 5:53

 

https://www.projectp.../jevent.htm#jun

 

The GRS will transit Jupiter's central meridian at either 3:03 or 3:35 a.m.

 

12 Jun 2019 7:03 UT

 

https://www.projectp...eve_grs.htm#jun

 

6/12/2019 @ 03:35 am

 

https://www.skyandte...great-red-spot/

 

Dave Mitsky


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#2 Cpk133

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:49 PM

If SkyPortal is correct, io will partially occlude its shadow.  Always wanted to catch that.  Too bad I have to work tomorrow!


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#3 Astroscrub

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:57 PM

Thanks!



#4 pgs/sdg

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 08:26 PM

Thank you Dave!



#5 Cpk133

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 09:05 PM

Just had a quick look with the 9.25 and binos, if it was at a good elevation, sundown would have been spectacular this eve.  I was using a 4mm on the moon and there were times when it was very steady.  Even at 10 degrees, Jupiter is revealing a fair amount of detail awash in atmospheric dispersion.  Hope the approaching clouds hold off till shadow Ingres.



#6 Qwizatzhaderach

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:16 PM

Thanks so much, using this now and it’s very helpful to reference.

#7 chuckles

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:24 PM

Its pouring here... Last night I had pretty meh seeing for around here, but still stayed out late enough to get in trouble with the lady :-) I love Jupiter season.



#8 naramsin

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 12:15 AM

I was lucky, stumbled on this tonight. Using Skysafari on my phone, I saw that the moons and shadows would transit. It was awesome seeing Io go in, then come out the other side, with Ganymede's shadow chasing behind. All this with a ~$80 Celestron 80mm F11.25 achro and a Meade 6.7mm UWA smoothie.


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#9 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 01:45 AM

After a beautifully clear day, things went downhill fast when night fell. By the time I arrived at the Naylor Observatory, the sky was filled with high clouds. While the transparency was poor, the seeing wasn't too bad and I was able to observe the start of Io's transit, Io's shadow transit, the start of Ganymede's transit, Ganymede's shadow transit, the end of Io's transit, and the end of Ganymede's transit using the ASH 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Astrola Newtonian.
 

During the Jovian events, I used magnifications of 103, 138, 159, 206, and 258x, which proved to be too much power. I saw the double shadow transit a few times while it was underway. Io's shadow traveled along the NEB and was quite difficult to detect. Ganymede's shadow was near Jupiter's north pole and was easy to see. I had the most success seeing the shadows at 138 and 159x. At times, Jupiter was embedded in clouds and was very difficult to discern.
 

I also observed the waxing gibbous Moon with the 12.5" f/6.5 Cave at 69 and 138x and an 8" f/6 Hardin Dob at 40, 60, 80, and 120x.
 

So it was a completely shallow sky night for me. I would have added 1 Ceres and Saturn to the list but the sky was just too cloudy and bright from moonlight.

 

Dave Mitsky


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#10 Miranda2525

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 02:08 AM

Thanks Dave!

 

I watched this event for three hours. It is THE BEST event I have ever saw on Jupiter !!!  Here are my liner notes...

 

I sent this as an email to a few friends...

 

I don't know if any of you saw this, but I did !!!!  It was a double shadow transit of two moons over the face of Jupiter tonight. I set up in my yard for the heck of it as the moon was fairly bright and doing DSO's while the moon was out at my regular dark spot was out.

So, I had a glimpse at Jupiter around 10:30-11pm and I saw a single shadow transit on the bottom right of Jupiter. (I use a reflector, so it will be a different view in a refractor or SCT).

Anyways, I had no clue about this, and I just randomly set up.....so I saw the first one and I could just barely see the second one on the middle, left below an EQ belt. This was at 200x using my William Optics Binoviewers,   :^)

So I then jacked up the power to 265x and I could def see the second transit !!!  I am betting it was from the smaller of the four bright moons of Jupiter, (Europa?)....because it looked very small. This one was really neat because the moon and shadow were almost touching each other.

So I watched the show from about 11pm until 2am right until I saw a HUGE festoon on the bottom EQ belt and the GRS emerging from right to left. The EQ belt where the GRS is seemed to have split into THREE separate parts !!!!  (Or maybe TWO ???)...Very hard to see because they are super thin now.

I then watched both moons and shadows slowly move over Jupiter for the next three hours until they both eventually were seen as just moons over the dark night sky.

 

https://astronomynow...events-in-2019/

 

Anyhow....I hope some of you witnessed this as it was incredibly awesome !!!!

I also had a peek at Saturn for about 15 minutes using 200x / 265x with the BV'ers. Amazing clarity !!!   :O

PS: Binoviewing planets is the only way I will look at them ever again. It's just 1000x times better with more detail to be seen using both eyes.  :^)  Same goes for the moon too.

 

What an event !!!!!  bow.gif


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#11 Qwizatzhaderach

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 06:39 AM

Quick question if anyone is still looking at this thread... I had a great time seeing Io and Ganymede transit. Transparency was good, seeing “meh”. I was using an 8” dob at 171x. When there were moments of good seeing Jupiter looked incredible (pretty impressive detail at that magnification, I thought). I could barely detect Io, and I definitely couldn’t see both Io and a shadow. I must’ve seen only one. I’m just curious if I was supposed to see both of them or if during opposition, because the angle of the sun is pretty much head on, you really only see one? I think I started to see Ganymede and a shadow during the start of its transit but then I got pretty tired and had to call it!
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#12 Gamewarden

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 08:39 AM

I have a 6SE and saw all 4 moons before transect. Then saw the 2 disappear  never to be seen again, no shadow nothing. I assume they just blended into Jupiters reflection. Do I need a bigger scope to see this?



#13 Slartibartfast

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 10:08 AM

I stumbled onto this event quite by accident!  I setup my Lightbridge 16 with the intention of trying out some stupidly high powers on the waxing gibbous Moon just for fun.  I was using a Nagler T6 3.5 and 2.5mm eyepieces (429x and 600x) and the views were actually not bad for lunar (during times of steady seeing).  The views weren't the best as there was some high haze, but I did it anyway.  Indeed I had quite a lot of fun doing this as I felt like I was orbiting the Moon at times watching craters and mountains slide beneath me.  It was sunrise over Copernicus and I noticed the secondary crater chains for the first time!  Anyway, I decided to leave the scope setup and stay up late to take a look at Jupiter and Saturn for the first time this apparition.  I came back out around 12:30pm EDT and took a look at Jupiter through a 9mm Nagler T6 (203x).  There were clouds around in the sky but fate was with me: Jupiter was in the clear part of the sky!  Initially, the view was very fuzzy due to bad seeing and Jupiter low on the southern horizon, but, during moments of clarity, I noticed the black dot near the northern polar region of Jupiter's disc.  "No way!  It's a shadow transit!"  As I watched for about 15 to 20 min. I began to notice a little "bud" poking out of Jupiter's western limb just in line with the Northern Equatorial belt.  I watched this for another 30 min. until Io became free of the limb.  During the steady moments, I could just make out a little detail in the cloud belts.  What an amazing thing to watch!  Afterwards, I took a break and came back out around 2:30am to look at Saturn.  The sky was still clear and Saturn looked so much paler and calmer than Jupiter.  During moments of clarity, the Cassini division showed crisp and clear as well as the subtle cloud bands.  I watched until about 3am, then I packed it in.  I haven't had an observing session this good in a long time.  I am paying for it and muddling through the day today with only 4 hours of sleep, but it was well worth it!  laugh.gif   Coffee is my friend today!  Bring on the caffeine!  imawake.gif


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#14 Slartibartfast

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 10:24 AM

Quick question if anyone is still looking at this thread... I had a great time seeing Io and Ganymede transit. Transparency was good, seeing “meh”. I was using an 8” dob at 171x. When there were moments of good seeing Jupiter looked incredible (pretty impressive detail at that magnification, I thought). I could barely detect Io, and I definitely couldn’t see both Io and a shadow. I must’ve seen only one. I’m just curious if I was supposed to see both of them or if during opposition, because the angle of the sun is pretty much head on, you really only see one? I think I started to see Ganymede and a shadow during the start of its transit but then I got pretty tired and had to call it!

Good question!  I could only see 1 shadow as well, but when I began observing, Io was very close to the limb and I did not notice it or its shadow until it began to "bud" off the limb.  As I watched the shadow (Ganymede's), I was trying to make out which moon was casting it, and when I saw Io start to cross out of Jupiter's disc, I thought it was Io's shadow that I was seeing.  But then I thought the angles were all wrong.  It wasn't until later when I went inside and looked it up that I learned that there was a double transit and that I was seeing Ganymede's shadow.  Judging by Sky and Telescope website's "Jupiter's Moons" app, it looks as if the moon and shadow are at the same position.  So, I think you are right.  Because Jupiter is at opposition, the Sun is head-on and the and the moon and its shadow are virtually co-located, aside, presumably, from some elevation difference above or below the ecliptic plane with respect to Earth.  Otherwise, if the Earth and Jupiter were exactly in a line with the Sun, then Jupiter's moon would hide its own shadow, I would think (probably a pretty rare event).



#15 Special Ed

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 12:17 PM

Take a look at Mr. Ferret's images and your questions might be answered. 

 

Good rule of thumb: before opposition the moon's shadows precede the moon; after opposition they follow the moon.  It's two days after opposition.


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#16 Slartibartfast

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 12:40 PM

Take a look at Mr. Ferret's images and your questions might be answered. 

 

Good rule of thumb: before opposition the moon's shadows precede the moon; after opposition they follow the moon.  It's two days after opposition.

That's good to know!  In his first image, it looks like Io is blocking the view of its own shadow.  Maybe that's why it was hard to see.



#17 Miranda2525

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 01:27 PM

Quick question if anyone is still looking at this thread... I had a great time seeing Io and Ganymede transit. Transparency was good, seeing “meh”. I was using an 8” dob at 171x. When there were moments of good seeing Jupiter looked incredible (pretty impressive detail at that magnification, I thought). I could barely detect Io, and I definitely couldn’t see both Io and a shadow. I must’ve seen only one. I’m just curious if I was supposed to see both of them or if during opposition, because the angle of the sun is pretty much head on, you really only see one? I think I started to see Ganymede and a shadow during the start of its transit but then I got pretty tired and had to call it!

Same thing happened to me at first and I was at 155x. I then tried 200x, and then had to go up to 265x to confirm it.

 

Once I saw the second smaller moon shadow transit, I knew exactly where to look and I went back to 200x.


Edited by Miranda2525, 12 June 2019 - 01:27 PM.


#18 naramsin

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 03:52 PM

I have a 6SE and saw all 4 moons before transect. Then saw the 2 disappear  never to be seen again, no shadow nothing. I assume they just blended into Jupiters reflection. Do I need a bigger scope to see this?

As I mentioned above, I used a 3 inch achro to see almost everything described (obviously without the detail of a bigger scope). Removing the diagonal and using both yellow and light blue filters helped, but I was able to see the two moons and the shadows without them.

 

By comparison, at about the same time, I looked at Saturn (lower on the horizon, so more atmospheric turbulence/false color) and could not really see the Cassini division clearly (though I saw some bands on the planet itself). Plus I'm only 30 minutes out of NYC, so Bortle Inferno skies. grin.gif

 

I'm sure using the Skysafari simulation helped me see things better. I probably wouldn't have noticed everything on my own.



#19 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 04:20 PM

If SkyPortal is correct, io will partially occlude its shadow.  Always wanted to catch that.  Too bad I have to work tomorrow!

The first image at https://www.cloudyni...orth/?p=9427148 shows exactly that.  Io's shadow can be hard to see sometimes and the fact that it was partially hidden during the transit made it even harder to detect.
 

Dave Mitsky

 


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#20 Cpk133

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 08:29 PM

The first image at https://www.cloudyni...orth/?p=9427148 shows exactly that.  Io's shadow can be hard to see sometimes and the fact that it was partially hidden during the transit made it even harder to detect.
 

Dave Mitsky

 

Yea that shadow was tiny!  Thought I was able to resolve io, but only because of the way it was obscuring its shadow.  Seeing was good for brief moments, just enough to keep me at the eyepiece.



#21 Miranda2525

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 12:19 AM

I stumbled onto this event quite by accident!  I setup my Lightbridge 16 with the intention of trying out some stupidly high powers on the waxing gibbous Moon just for fun.  I was using a Nagler T6 3.5 and 2.5mm eyepieces (429x and 600x) and the views were actually not bad for lunar (during times of steady seeing).  The views weren't the best as there was some high haze, but I did it anyway.  Indeed I had quite a lot of fun doing this as I felt like I was orbiting the Moon at times watching craters and mountains slide beneath me.  It was sunrise over Copernicus and I noticed the secondary crater chains for the first time!  Anyway, I decided to leave the scope setup and stay up late to take a look at Jupiter and Saturn for the first time this apparition.  I came back out around 12:30pm EDT and took a look at Jupiter through a 9mm Nagler T6 (203x).  There were clouds around in the sky but fate was with me: Jupiter was in the clear part of the sky!  Initially, the view was very fuzzy due to bad seeing and Jupiter low on the southern horizon, but, during moments of clarity, I noticed the black dot near the northern polar region of Jupiter's disc.  "No way!  It's a shadow transit!"  As I watched for about 15 to 20 min. I began to notice a little "bud" poking out of Jupiter's western limb just in line with the Northern Equatorial belt.  I watched this for another 30 min. until Io became free of the limb.  During the steady moments, I could just make out a little detail in the cloud belts.  What an amazing thing to watch!  Afterwards, I took a break and came back out around 2:30am to look at Saturn.  The sky was still clear and Saturn looked so much paler and calmer than Jupiter.  During moments of clarity, the Cassini division showed crisp and clear as well as the subtle cloud bands.  I watched until about 3am, then I packed it in.  I haven't had an observing session this good in a long time.  I am paying for it and muddling through the day today with only 4 hours of sleep, but it was well worth it!  laugh.gif   Coffee is my friend today!  Bring on the caffeine!  imawake.gif

This is the exact scenario for me as well !!!  I went outside to fiddle a bit and once I saw Jupiter, the same thing happened to me in the same order, lol. The seeing was in & out for me, but once it stabilized for quick moments, it was very sharp.



#22 SabiaJD

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Posted 15 June 2019 - 09:59 AM

Thanks Dave,  did see the events.




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